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Landfill Capacity

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1996
Re: "Recycling Is Not Enough to Stem a Surging Tide of Waste," May 19. In your editorial on landfill capacity, you stated that the huge landfill in Puente Hills has been leaking a "chemical soup" into the ground water for years. No surprise there. But when you point out that this has led to the suggestion of putting another huge landfill in Elsmere Canyon, this is a surprise! Have we learned nothing from Puente Hills? Elsmere Canyon directly feeds the Santa Clarita aquifer and is a wetland in the national forest.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
September 2, 2001
As a general rule, a politician's stand on any landfill depends on its proximity. Is it in his or her district? Heated opposition. Close by? Polite objections. Far away? Hey, we've got to put our garbage somewhere. State Sen. Gloria Romero (D-Los Angeles) has the giant Puente Hills landfill in her district. She even used it as a prop last month in announcing the creation of the state Select Committee on Urban Landfills.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1991 | JOANNA M. MILLER
The county's regional waste district will seek permission to double the trash capacity at the Toland Road Landfill between Santa Paula and Fillmore, board directors decided Thursday. Ventura Regional Sanitation District directors also decided to abandon the search for a site to build a publicly owned and operated landfill, a decision that followed by two months the completion of a $160,000 study that evaluated 35 potential landfill sites.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1999
Re "Sunshine Canyon Extension Is a Clean, Safe Alternative," April 25. Dan Tempelis states that recycling programs have diverted more than 47% of materials from landfills but then segues into a discussion of the need for more space in Sunshine Canyon Landfill. What he doesn't mention is that Browning-Ferris Industries has already destroyed acres of oak forest on the operating county-side landfill--degraded land that can hold 70 million tons of garbage, enough space to last 35 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1996
What would happen in Los Angeles County if every potential or actual landfill neighbor actually got one of his favorite wishes: no new dumps, and no expansions for existing dumps between now and the year 2010? Well, according to statistics from the county's Department of Public Works, the results would be disastrous. It is difficult to quantify the county's enormous waste generation rate, but we'll try. Last year, it was 50,129 tons per day, six days a week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1993
Gerald Simmons' article "Trashing Common Sense" (Valley Commentary, Nov. 14) ascribed to me the statement "There is enough (landfill) capacity (in L.A. County) to meet a state legal mandate that every county have 15 years' disposal capacity." I never did, and do not now, make any such claim. Mr. Simmons' only source of information from me is a report prepared by my staff, dated Aug. 11, 1993, that lists the present permitted and actual waste tonnages for 20 landfills in the county, as well as the remaining life expectancies for eight major landfills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD
Consultants Monday unveiled a lengthy report on the future of the county's landfill system, but some Waste Management Commission members are already expressing strong reservations about one option: selling the dumps to a private operator. The 2-inch-thick report, prepared over the last two months by A.G. Edwards & Sons Inc. and Alex, Brown & Sons Inc., does not recommend specific action. But it does offer an exhaustive analysis of the landfill operations and examines several possible scenarios.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1990
The Los Angeles County Planning Commission on Thursday sent its final recommendation on Sunshine Canyon Landfill expansion plans to the Board of Supervisors, which will make the final decisions in late November or December. The commission voted 3 to 0 to allow dump owners, Browning-Ferris Industries, to expand the landfill capacity by 17 million tons, rather than the 70 million tons the company requested.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1999
Re "Sunshine Canyon Extension Is a Clean, Safe Alternative," April 25. Dan Tempelis states that recycling programs have diverted more than 47% of materials from landfills but then segues into a discussion of the need for more space in Sunshine Canyon Landfill. What he doesn't mention is that Browning-Ferris Industries has already destroyed acres of oak forest on the operating county-side landfill--degraded land that can hold 70 million tons of garbage, enough space to last 35 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD
Consultants Monday unveiled a lengthy report on the future of the county's landfill system, but some Waste Management Commission members are already expressing strong reservations about one option: selling the dumps to a private operator. The 2-inch-thick report, prepared over the last two months by A.G. Edwards & Sons Inc. and Alex, Brown & Sons Inc., does not recommend specific action. But it does offer an exhaustive analysis of the landfill operations and examines several possible scenarios.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1996
Re: "Recycling Is Not Enough to Stem a Surging Tide of Waste," May 19. In your editorial on landfill capacity, you stated that the huge landfill in Puente Hills has been leaking a "chemical soup" into the ground water for years. No surprise there. But when you point out that this has led to the suggestion of putting another huge landfill in Elsmere Canyon, this is a surprise! Have we learned nothing from Puente Hills? Elsmere Canyon directly feeds the Santa Clarita aquifer and is a wetland in the national forest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1996
What would happen in Los Angeles County if every potential or actual landfill neighbor actually got one of his favorite wishes: no new dumps, and no expansions for existing dumps between now and the year 2010? Well, according to statistics from the county's Department of Public Works, the results would be disastrous. It is difficult to quantify the county's enormous waste generation rate, but we'll try. Last year, it was 50,129 tons per day, six days a week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1995
The truth is we will still need the Lopez Canyon Landfill until we can come up with an inexpensive and viable way to recycle our waste. I work at the landfill and my job for more than three years was as a spotter on trash. Every day I saw tons of paper, plastic of all kinds, cardboard, tin cans and aluminum being dumped at the site. This has got to stop. Our recycling program is not working. The earthquake debris did not affect the landfill capacity, as most of the debris was sent elsewhere.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1993
Gerald Simmons' article "Trashing Common Sense" (Valley Commentary, Nov. 14) ascribed to me the statement "There is enough (landfill) capacity (in L.A. County) to meet a state legal mandate that every county have 15 years' disposal capacity." I never did, and do not now, make any such claim. Mr. Simmons' only source of information from me is a report prepared by my staff, dated Aug. 11, 1993, that lists the present permitted and actual waste tonnages for 20 landfills in the county, as well as the remaining life expectancies for eight major landfills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1993 | GERALD SIMMONS, Gerald Simmons is a dentist who lives in Granada Hills. and
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors is scheduled to make a decision this week on the proposed expansion and reopening of Sunshine Canyon Landfill, located 1 1/2 miles from Sylmar, Granada Hills and Porter Ranch. Here, Browning-Ferris Industries plans to gut 542 acres of a designated significant ecological area, destroying 20,000 mature trees to build a giant landfill. A mile downwind and downstream lies the uncovered Los Angeles Reservoir.
NEWS
September 18, 1986
Starting in October, residents will pay $7.14 for monthly curbside rubbish disposal, a 30% hike from the current $5.50 rate. The City Council approved the increase at its Sept. 9 meeting. The new rate reflects a 14.9% annual rate hike plus an 82-cent surcharge, according to Deputy City Manager Jesse Duff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1993 | GERALD SIMMONS, Gerald Simmons is a dentist who lives in Granada Hills. and
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors is scheduled to make a decision this week on the proposed expansion and reopening of Sunshine Canyon Landfill, located 1 1/2 miles from Sylmar, Granada Hills and Porter Ranch. Here, Browning-Ferris Industries plans to gut 542 acres of a designated significant ecological area, destroying 20,000 mature trees to build a giant landfill. A mile downwind and downstream lies the uncovered Los Angeles Reservoir.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1993 | CHIP JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A controversial plan to expand Sunshine Canyon Landfill was approved for the second time Wednesday by the Los Angeles County Regional Planning Commission. The landfill, located in the Santa Susana Mountains above Granada Hills, has been a battleground pitting Los Angeles city and county officials against each other as well as environmentalists versus Browning-Ferris Industries Inc., one of the nation's largest waste-management concerns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1991 | JOANNA M. MILLER
The county's regional waste district will seek permission to double the trash capacity at the Toland Road Landfill between Santa Paula and Fillmore, board directors decided Thursday. Ventura Regional Sanitation District directors also decided to abandon the search for a site to build a publicly owned and operated landfill, a decision that followed by two months the completion of a $160,000 study that evaluated 35 potential landfill sites.
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