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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2001 | KIMI YOSHINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Landlord Sam Menlo got a reprieve Tuesday when a judge denied Anaheim officials' request to order the landlord back to the run-down apartment complex where he had been sentenced to spend 60 days of home confinement. Menlo served less than half of that sentence before suffering two strokes in November. Orange County Superior Court Judge W.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2001 | KIMI YOSHINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Landlord Sam Menlo got a reprieve Tuesday when a judge denied Anaheim officials' request to order the landlord back to the run-down apartment complex where he had been sentenced to spend 60 days of home confinement. Menlo served less than half of that sentence before suffering two strokes in November. Orange County Superior Court Judge W.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2000 | KIMI YOSHINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Landlord Sam Menlo won't be returning to his run-down Anaheim apartment complex any time soon--at least not until a judge reviews more medical records to determine whether Menlo is healthy enough to serve the rest of his house-arrest sentence. Menlo served less than half of his 60-day sentence at the Ridgewood Garden apartments before he apparently suffered a stroke on Nov. 25. He was admitted to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles but has been released.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2000 | KIMI YOSHINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Landlord Sam Menlo won't be returning to his run-down Anaheim apartment complex any time soon--at least not until a judge reviews more medical records to determine whether Menlo is healthy enough to serve the rest of his house-arrest sentence. Menlo served less than half of his 60-day sentence at the Ridgewood Garden apartments before he apparently suffered a stroke on Nov. 25. He was admitted to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles but has been released.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes and Martha Groves
From the balcony of her Crescent Drive apartment, Shari Able takes in the luxurious view - a picture-postcard panorama of the homes of Beverly Hills. Her home sits above a Whole Foods stocked with organic kabocha squash and Dungeness crabs. Rodeo Drive's boutiques are a brisk walk away. But the 74-year-old is quick to warn elderly suitors who think her 90210 ZIP Code means a cushy bank account. Her federally subsidized apartment costs her roughly $200 a month, she said. "I told one guy from Long Beach, 'I live in Beverly Hills, but it's the only HUD building in Beverly Hills,'" Able recalled one morning over coffee and madeleines.
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