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Landmark Decision

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NEWS
March 12, 1992
The Los Angeles Cultural Heritage Commission has agreed to consider making the soon-to-close Woman's Christian Temperance Union Home for Women in Eagle Rock a city landmark, but WCTU directors fear it that it could complicate efforts to sell the site. Staff members said the panel will probably inspect the 65-year-old complex on Norwalk Avenue in April, then make its recommendation. The final decision will be up to the Los Angeles City Council.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
June 29, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court promises "equal justice under law" - the words carved into stone on its facade - and last week, the justices set out a new definition of equal justice that they see as suited to this time. On the last day of their term, they struck down a 1990s-era federal law that denied all legal recognition to the tens of thousands of same-sex couples who have been legally married in the last decade - a ruling that set off gay rights celebrations from the court's steps to the West Coast.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1991 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
In 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court delivered a desegregation ruling in the Brown vs. Board of Education case that would dramatically alter the course of American life. But slowly and agonizingly. You get some of this enduring saga--mostly the judicial part--in "Separate but Equal," an interesting but labored two-part ABC drama airing at 9 p.m. Sunday and Monday on Channels 7, 3 and 10. As far as it goes, this is the "Rocky" of legal/civil rights stories.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2012 | Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
Robert R. Beezer, a federal judge on the nation's busiest court for the last 28 years and author of landmark decisions on judicial authority, digital media sharing and capital punishment, has died of lung cancer. He was 83. Beezer's death Friday at a Seattle hospital was the sixth among U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals judges in little more than a year, dealing yet another blow to the overwhelmed bench that hears cases from nine Western states and two Pacific territories. Four of the 9th Circuit's 29 authorized active judgeships are vacant due to partisan wrangling in the U.S. Senate over nominees of President Obama, and Beezer's death now drops to 18 the number of semi-retired senior judges who help shoulder caseloads twice that of the other 12 federal appeals courts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1998 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A security guard now patrols the wobbly Aliso Pier in South Laguna, where beach-goers run the risk of being hit by falling chunks of concrete. The storm-damaged pier is in such bad shape that the Orange County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday will decide whether to tear down the 27-year-old landmark. "It must be demolished," said Supervisor Tom Wilson, who added an emergency item on the pier to the board's agenda. "It's unsafe. It cannot be repaired. We've done all the analysis that can be done.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1987 | From Reuters
Citizens of a central Japanese city Saturday celebrated winning a two-year battle to oust an underworld organization from their neighborhood. But gang members said they will remain. In a landmark decision Friday, the district court in Hamamatsu, southwest of Tokyo, ordered the 110-member Ichiriki-ikka gang to stop using a central building as its office. It was the first time a Japanese citizens' group had succeeded in ousting an underworld gang.
WORLD
October 22, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Kuwait's highest court granted women the right to obtain a passport without their husband's approval, the case's lawyer said, in the latest stride for women's rights in this small, oil-rich emirate. Attorney Adel Qurban said the landmark decision "freed" Kuwaiti women from the 1962 law requiring a husband's signature to obtain a passport. His client, Fatima Baghli, is one of thousands of women who have been petitioning courts for the right. The court found the article in the decades-old law "unconstitutional" because it goes against the principle of equal rights for men and women.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1987
I was delighted to hear of the 3-0 decision by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco to return Vincent Chalk to the classroom. This indeed is a landmark decision that will positively affect the thousands of people living with AIDS in this country. The three appellate court judges are to be commended for being able to rise above the ignorance and fear surrounding this disease to render the only fair decision possible. How very fortunate we are to have someone like Chalk finally, publicly stand up and fight for his rights as a person with AIDS.
NEWS
July 13, 1985 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration, in an unusual move certain to fuel the controversy over legalized abortion, has decided to ask the Supreme Court to overturn its landmark 1973 decision that made abortion a constitutionally protected right, The Times learned Friday. Acting Solicitor General Charles Fried, in a brief to be filed Monday, will cite lower-court rulings from Pennsylvania and Illinois in arguing that the decision in the case, Roe vs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1996 | JEFF McDONALD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Word of the state Supreme Court decision allowing judges to reject lengthy jail terms for "three strikes" defendants rippled through the Ventura County courthouse Thursday faster than a guilty verdict in a high-profile murder case. Local judges, prosecutors and defense attorneys split sharply on the ruling, with some attorneys praising the landmark decision and others complaining that dangerous convicts could now be set free too soon. Superior Court Judge Steven Z.
OPINION
December 29, 2010 | By Andrew Cohen
Perhaps the simplest thing to say about the law in 2010 is this: Never in America were so many judged by so few with such inconclusive results. As our population rose, and Americans filed 100 million or so lawsuits, the role of the courts somehow shrank in our lives. Dozens of federal judgeships remained empty throughout the year, the victim of partisan bickering on Capitol Hill. State judicial systems were wracked by budget cuts, which forced furloughs and court closures. And our prisons overflowed even though, by some accounts, we are opening on average a new one weekly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2010 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
A 1920 Brentwood Park house considered to be an early example of Spanish Colonial Revival architecture in Los Angeles will not be designated a city landmark — a categorization that would have made it more difficult for owners to demolish the structure. City Councilman Bill Rosendahl, who represents the neighborhood, told the Los Angeles Cultural Heritage Commission on Thursday that he did not consider the two-story house historic and that the nomination for landmark status had unfairly caught the new owners by surprise.
WORLD
October 22, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Kuwait's highest court granted women the right to obtain a passport without their husband's approval, the case's lawyer said, in the latest stride for women's rights in this small, oil-rich emirate. Attorney Adel Qurban said the landmark decision "freed" Kuwaiti women from the 1962 law requiring a husband's signature to obtain a passport. His client, Fatima Baghli, is one of thousands of women who have been petitioning courts for the right. The court found the article in the decades-old law "unconstitutional" because it goes against the principle of equal rights for men and women.
NATIONAL
June 27, 2003 | Mitchell Landsberg and John M. Glionna, Times Staff Writers
The Supreme Court's decision Thursday to strike down Texas' criminal sodomy law electrified both sides in what Justice Antonin Scalia called "the culture war," with advocates for gay civil rights and religious fundamentalism agreeing that the ruling was a watershed that could ultimately knock down barriers to same-sex marriage.
NATIONAL
November 24, 2002 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
Maybe you don't have a right to remain silent after all. The Supreme Court in its landmark Miranda opinion ruled that police must respect the rights of people who are held for questioning. Officers must warn them of their right to remain silent, and, equally important, honor their refusal to talk further. But that widely known rule is about to be reconsidered in the high court in the case of a farm worker here who was shot five times after a brief encounter with police.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2001 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Instead of jars of cold cream, there are trays of cold cuts. Display cases of perfume, rouge and lipstick have given way to shelves of pinto beans, ravioli and lettuce. And where special windows once showcased mannequins dressed in poodle skirts and pillbox hats, television monitors now beam images of shoppers squeezing melons.
NEWS
July 5, 1985 | DAVID JOHNSTON, Times Staff Writer
One of the most significant trends in American charity--the rapid growth of competition in workplace fund raising--suffered a severe setback this week before the U.S. Supreme Court, nonprofit leaders nationwide say. The high court ruled, 4 to 3, that the Reagan Administration may exclude nonprofit political and legal advocacy groups from sharing in the Combined Federal Campaign, the U.S. government's annual drive for charitable donations that raises $120 million from federal employees .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2001 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Instead of jars of cold cream, there are trays of cold cuts. Display cases of perfume, rouge and lipstick have given way to shelves of pinto beans, ravioli and lettuce. And where special windows once showcased mannequins dressed in poodle skirts and pillbox hats, television monitors now beam images of shoppers squeezing melons.
NEWS
December 31, 1998 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israel's liberal Jewish movements Wednesday won a landmark court case in their long struggle for official recognition here but immediately braced for new battles in parliament. A Jerusalem District Court judge ruled that 23 petitioners converted to Judaism by Reform rabbis, in Israel and abroad, are entitled to be registered as Jews by the Interior Ministry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1998 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A security guard now patrols the wobbly Aliso Pier in South Laguna, where beach-goers run the risk of being hit by falling chunks of concrete. The storm-damaged pier is in such bad shape that the Orange County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday will decide whether to tear down the 27-year-old landmark. "It must be demolished," said Supervisor Tom Wilson, who added an emergency item on the pier to the board's agenda. "It's unsafe. It cannot be repaired. We've done all the analysis that can be done.
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