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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1998 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal and state officials Wednesday announced a $22 million program to buy up homes across California damaged beyond repair by landslides during last winter's El Nino storms, including 10 homes in the San Fernando Valley. The funding includes $2.4 million in grants to aid homeowners from West Hills, Northridge and Studio City. Another $860,000 has been set aside to help their counterparts in Topanga and Malibu.
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NEWS
March 7, 2001 | ERIC MALNIC and DAVID KELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A persistent Pacific storm continued to spin off Point Conception on Tuesday after dumping up to 22 inches of rain that triggered mudslides, damaged crops and cut Amtrak rail service between Los Angeles and San Luis Obispo. Forecasters said a second storm due later this week could drop more rain on hillsides that are already soaked to capacity. Precipitation from the first storm varied widely, with Santa Barbara and Ventura counties feeling the brunt of it.
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NEWS
June 10, 1999 | Associated Press
A hillside where several youngsters were playing gave way, killing an 11-year-old boy and leaving a friend buried up to his waist, deputies said. The accident occurred Tuesday evening as the boys dug a hole on the side of a 50-foot bluff, Sgt. George Miller of the Riverside County Sheriff's Department said Wednesday. Jose Ayala was killed; three friends, all between the ages of 9 and 11, were uninjured. One of the children was buried up to his waist, but his friends dug him out, Miller said.
NEWS
June 10, 1999 | Associated Press
A hillside where several youngsters were playing gave way, killing an 11-year-old boy and leaving a friend buried up to his waist, deputies said. The accident occurred Tuesday evening as the boys dug a hole on the side of a 50-foot bluff, Sgt. George Miller of the Riverside County Sheriff's Department said Wednesday. Jose Ayala was killed; three friends, all between the ages of 9 and 11, were uninjured. One of the children was buried up to his waist, but his friends dug him out, Miller said.
NEWS
May 22, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A huge boulder loosened by weekend rains careened onto a road in eastern Butte County and crushed a car, killing two people and seriously injuring two others, authorities said. The Ford Bronco was driving at 5 m.p.h. when a rockslide tumbled down the mountainside and hit the vehicle on a country road about 20 miles northeast of Oroville, California Highway Patrol Officer Bob Jordan said. "There was no way to avoid it," he said. The driver, Kenneth W. Dalling, 52, of Kittitas, Wash.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In a rare defeat for insurers, the California Supreme Court ruled Monday that homeowners who suffer damages in landslides or other events excluded from their policies can still collect insurance claims based on negligence by government officials, developers or others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1993 | BOB ELSTON
Buried under landslides for much of the last five months, part of Backbay Drive will remain closed until the end of June as workers repair portions of the road that were torn up by falling dirt and subsequent cleanup operations, officials said Friday. They had hoped to reopen before summer the northern half of the popular recreational trail around the Upper Newport Bay Ecological Preserve.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1998 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Confirming an on-again, off-again program that federal officials earlier said was only under study, U.S. officials announced Wednesday the government will spend $20 million to buy California homes made unlivable by El Nino-related mudslides. Under the program, the Federal Emergency Management Agency will pay up to $140 per square foot of indoor space for houses made uninhabitable by mudslides and in danger of further damage.
NEWS
February 14, 1998 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As damage mounted Friday in what a federal geologist warned may become the worst mudslide season in California history, the state insurance commissioner suggested that the state might have to provide mudslide insurance to hillside homeowners, as it does for earthquakes.
NEWS
March 7, 2001 | ERIC MALNIC and DAVID KELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A persistent Pacific storm continued to spin off Point Conception on Tuesday after dumping up to 22 inches of rain that triggered mudslides, damaged crops and cut Amtrak rail service between Los Angeles and San Luis Obispo. Forecasters said a second storm due later this week could drop more rain on hillsides that are already soaked to capacity. Precipitation from the first storm varied widely, with Santa Barbara and Ventura counties feeling the brunt of it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1998 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal and state officials Wednesday announced a $22 million program to buy up homes across California damaged beyond repair by landslides during last winter's El Nino storms, including 10 homes in the San Fernando Valley. The funding includes $2.4 million in grants to aid homeowners from West Hills, Northridge and Studio City. Another $860,000 has been set aside to help their counterparts in Topanga and Malibu.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1998 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Confirming an on-again, off-again program that federal officials earlier said was only under study, U.S. officials announced Wednesday the government will spend $20 million to buy California homes made unlivable by El Nino-related mudslides. Under the program, the Federal Emergency Management Agency will pay up to $140 per square foot of indoor space for houses made uninhabitable by mudslides and in danger of further damage.
NEWS
February 14, 1998 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As damage mounted Friday in what a federal geologist warned may become the worst mudslide season in California history, the state insurance commissioner suggested that the state might have to provide mudslide insurance to hillside homeowners, as it does for earthquakes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1993 | BOB ELSTON
Buried under landslides for much of the last five months, part of Backbay Drive will remain closed until the end of June as workers repair portions of the road that were torn up by falling dirt and subsequent cleanup operations, officials said Friday. They had hoped to reopen before summer the northern half of the popular recreational trail around the Upper Newport Bay Ecological Preserve.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In a rare defeat for insurers, the California Supreme Court ruled Monday that homeowners who suffer damages in landslides or other events excluded from their policies can still collect insurance claims based on negligence by government officials, developers or others.
NEWS
May 22, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A huge boulder loosened by weekend rains careened onto a road in eastern Butte County and crushed a car, killing two people and seriously injuring two others, authorities said. The Ford Bronco was driving at 5 m.p.h. when a rockslide tumbled down the mountainside and hit the vehicle on a country road about 20 miles northeast of Oroville, California Highway Patrol Officer Bob Jordan said. "There was no way to avoid it," he said. The driver, Kenneth W. Dalling, 52, of Kittitas, Wash.
NEWS
August 28, 1999 | From Reuters
U.S. forecasters said on Friday they did not foresee a return of the El Nino weather pattern, blamed for chaotic weather worldwide, for the next year. Meteorologists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said El Nino, a periodic warming of the central Pacific Ocean, will not return soon because its sister, La Nina, is still alive and well.
NEWS
February 6, 1998 | MILES CORWIN and MARIA L. LA GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An El Nino-spawned storm battered Northern California on Thursday, forcing the evacuation by helicopter of dozens of people, shutting down major tourist attractions and prompting the cancellation of more than 75 flights, but weather experts predicted that a new storm today will cause even more problems. "This will be a big one," said National Weather Service forecaster Michael Mercer. "And it's only the first in a series of storms."
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