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Landslides Los Angeles

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1999 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From their two-bedroom bungalow nestled high in the Hollywood Hills, Michael and Erin White have a commanding view of the San Fernando Valley as it stretches out beyond the Hollywood Freeway and Universal City. But since last year's El Nino rains chewed away a portion of the hillside surrounding their Pacific View Drive property, the couple have had little time to enjoy the rarefied air or the scenic vistas.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2000 | JESSICA GARRISON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Thrifty golfers take note: Thanks to a landslide, a discount is coming. That is, if you are willing to give up three holes. Ocean Trails Golf Course in Rancho Palos Verdes has issued an unusual "Fore!" Instead of the traditional 18 holes, the course with spectacular ocean views plans to open as soon as August with 15 holes. While still under construction, the cliff-top course became famous last June when half of its 18th hole plunged into the Pacific as a result of a slide.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1991 | CAROL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two months ago, Allen White was comfortably ensconced in his million-dollar mansion in the hills above Sherman Oaks. But that was before the lot that holds the two-story, streamlined structure--complete with a Japanese meditation garden--began sliding down the steep grade behind it. Worried city officials banished White from his home of 15 years, afraid the house might suddenly tumble down the hillside. The woes of a man who had considered himself an "insulated CEO type" were just beginning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1999
In another setback for a luxury golf course that lost half its 18th hole to a landslide into the ocean, the California Coastal Commission has rejected a key repair plan. The commission, which had previously approved two other phases in the repair plan for the Ocean Trails golf course, said Tuesday that a proposal to insert sheer pins into the slide area might provide only a temporary solution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1999
In another setback for a luxury golf course that lost half its 18th hole to a landslide into the ocean, the California Coastal Commission has rejected a key repair plan. The commission, which had previously approved two other phases in the repair plan for the Ocean Trails golf course, said Tuesday that a proposal to insert sheer pins into the slide area might provide only a temporary solution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1999
The owners of Ocean Trails Golf Club, where the 18th hole slid into the ocean in June, just weeks before the new luxury course was scheduled to open, have received permission to rebuild from the California Coastal Commission. "We see this as a vote of confidence for what we are doing at Ocean Trails," said Ken Zuckerman, co-chief executive of the controversial development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2000 | JESSICA GARRISON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Thrifty golfers take note: Thanks to a landslide, a discount is coming. That is, if you are willing to give up three holes. Ocean Trails Golf Course in Rancho Palos Verdes has issued an unusual "Fore!" Instead of the traditional 18 holes, the course with spectacular ocean views plans to open as soon as August with 15 holes. While still under construction, the cliff-top course became famous last June when half of its 18th hole plunged into the Pacific as a result of a slide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1994
The Los Angeles City Council voted this week to pay $900,000 to a Pacific Palisades woman whose hillside home suffered severe damage during a 1993 landslide. More than a dozen homeowners have filed claims against the city and Caltrans, accusing them of weakening the bluffs during construction of Pacific Coast Highway and other roads. Last month, two couples received $2.5 million from the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1991 | CAROL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two months ago, Allen White was comfortably ensconced in his million-dollar mansion in the rolling hills above Sherman Oaks. But that was before the lot that holds the two-story, streamlined structure--complete with a Japanese meditation garden--began sliding down the steep grade behind it. Worried city officials banished White from his home of 15 years, afraid the house might suddenly tumble down the hillside.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1995
A minor rock slide closed both lanes of the Santa Susana Pass on Thursday, authorities said. The slide occurred a mile west of Topanga Canyon Boulevard at about 4:30 p.m., and drivers were diverted to the Simi Valley Freeway, according to Lt. Mike Florio of the Los Angeles Police Department. The two-lane highway is expected to be reopened early today after Caltrans crews remove the rocks, Florio said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1999
The owners of Ocean Trails Golf Club, where the 18th hole slid into the ocean in June, just weeks before the new luxury course was scheduled to open, have received permission to rebuild from the California Coastal Commission. "We see this as a vote of confidence for what we are doing at Ocean Trails," said Ken Zuckerman, co-chief executive of the controversial development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1999 | MONTE MORIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Developers of the Ocean Trails Golf Club on the Palos Verdes Peninsula unveiled plans Tuesday for reconstruction of the landslide-damaged 18th hole and announced that their geologists blame the June collapse on runoff from a county sewer line. Although officials at the Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County deny the allegation, a report commissioned by the developers states that the leaky sewer line soaked and weakened surrounding earth with 2 million gallons of water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1999 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From their two-bedroom bungalow nestled high in the Hollywood Hills, Michael and Erin White have a commanding view of the San Fernando Valley as it stretches out beyond the Hollywood Freeway and Universal City. But since last year's El Nino rains chewed away a portion of the hillside surrounding their Pacific View Drive property, the couple have had little time to enjoy the rarefied air or the scenic vistas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1998 | SUE McALLISTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Traffic on a stretch of Pacific Coast Highway through Malibu will be limited to one lane in each direction for three more months, but officials are hopeful that commuters and beach-goers this summer will not experience crippling traffic jams. Workers at the site of last month's rockslide at Las Flores Canyon Road began a daily 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1998
February storms caused $3 million in damage locally, according to a status report submitted to the City Council this week. About $2 million of the repairs are expected to be covered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency; the rest will come from the city's general fund, said public works Director John Clement. Most of the damage has been from landslides, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1998 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A waterlogged hillside collapsed late Saturday, crushing a house into an 8-foot pile of twisted metal and shattered wood. The house in the 3900 block of Eureka Drive was empty. It had been deemed too dangerous to inhabit last week as the hillside above became saturated by the unrelenting rain. The family "moved out, thank God," said David Keim, public information officer for the Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety. "They would be dead right now."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1998 | SUE McALLISTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Traffic on a stretch of Pacific Coast Highway through Malibu will be limited to one lane in each direction for three more months, but officials are hopeful that commuters and beach-goers this summer will not experience crippling traffic jams. Workers at the site of last month's rockslide at Las Flores Canyon Road began a daily 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1996
The Los Angeles City Council voted Wednesday to spend nearly $4.5 million to settle a series of lawsuits over a 1993 landslide that still threatens homes in the Santa Monica Mountains. The landslide took place after the March 1993 rains in the hillside above North Beverly Drive, west of the Lower Franklin Reservoir. Although the slide did not severely damage the homes, the residents were forced to evacuate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1998 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A waterlogged Studio City hillside that collapsed over the weekend crushed the house below. All that remained Sunday was an 8-foot pile of twisted metal and shattered wood. The house, in the 3900 block of Eureka Drive, was empty. It had been deemed too dangerous to inhabit last week as the hillside above became saturated by unrelenting rain. The family "moved out. Thank God," said David Keim, public information officer for the Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1996
The Los Angeles City Council voted Wednesday to spend nearly $4.5 million to settle a series of lawsuits over a 1993 landslide that still threatens homes in the Santa Monica Mountains. The landslide took place after the March 1993 rains in the hillside above North Beverly Drive, west of the Lower Franklin Reservoir. Although the slide did not severely damage the homes, the residents were forced to evacuate.
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