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Landslides Peru

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NEWS
February 21, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Heavy rains slowed the grisly task of pulling bodies from mud and rocks Thursday amid dwindling hopes of finding more survivors of an Andean mudslide that killed as many as 300 villagers. Rescuers used picks, spades and their hands until another slide forced them to stop working about midday. Civil Defense officials, who said 43 bodies had been recovered, said many of the dead were likely to remain entombed forever as the 30-foot-deep mud was expected to harden before they could be located.
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NEWS
January 16, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Fifteen people were killed in the south of the country after heavy rains triggered a mudslide that tore through towns and villages, leaving thousands of evacuated people stranded on nearby hilltops, authorities said. But President Alberto Fujimori eased fears of an even larger disaster after inspecting the area. He announced that Tuesday night's avalanche killed 13 people in the worst-hit towns of Yanatile and Santa Teresa, where a deluge of rocks and mud obliterated more than 340 homes.
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NEWS
February 28, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A wall of mud, water and debris swept through part of a jungle town, leaving at least 21 people dead and about 100 missing, authorities said. A natural dam, which had formed on the Cachiyacu River, broke and a torrent devastated a portion of San Miguel, a town 425 miles north of Lima. Some residents managed to swim to safety, and 300 were left homeless. At least 83 homes were swept away.
NEWS
February 21, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Heavy rains slowed the grisly task of pulling bodies from mud and rocks Thursday amid dwindling hopes of finding more survivors of an Andean mudslide that killed as many as 300 villagers. Rescuers used picks, spades and their hands until another slide forced them to stop working about midday. Civil Defense officials, who said 43 bodies had been recovered, said many of the dead were likely to remain entombed forever as the 30-foot-deep mud was expected to harden before they could be located.
NEWS
January 16, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Fifteen people were killed in the south of the country after heavy rains triggered a mudslide that tore through towns and villages, leaving thousands of evacuated people stranded on nearby hilltops, authorities said. But President Alberto Fujimori eased fears of an even larger disaster after inspecting the area. He announced that Tuesday night's avalanche killed 13 people in the worst-hit towns of Yanatile and Santa Teresa, where a deluge of rocks and mud obliterated more than 340 homes.
NEWS
February 20, 1997 | From Reuters
Rescuers using picks, shovels and their bare hands searched Wednesday for the bodies of as many as 300 peasants buried under a mudslide that swept away two remote Andean villages. "This is a disaster with very serious consequences. It has literally buried two communities where there were approximately 100 families," President Alberto Fujimori told a local radio station. "We calculate that there are between 250 and 300 people buried under this immense amount of mud that we are seeing here."
BUSINESS
June 14, 2007 | Marla Dickerson, Times Staff Writer
FOR the freight trains rolling through this Central American nation, every journey is a one-way trip to trouble. Scrap-metal pirates plunder the tracks. Purloined spikes cause derailments. Seasonal rains bring washouts. Squatters build homes in the right of way. The track supervisor packs a 9--millimeter pistol. Just in case. Engineers carry shovels to scoop garbage off the line in Sanarate, whose residents use it as a municipal dump.
NEWS
February 20, 1997 | From Reuters
Rescuers using picks, shovels and their bare hands searched Wednesday for the bodies of as many as 300 peasants buried under a mudslide that swept away two remote Andean villages. "This is a disaster with very serious consequences. It has literally buried two communities where there were approximately 100 families," President Alberto Fujimori told a local radio station. "We calculate that there are between 250 and 300 people buried under this immense amount of mud that we are seeing here."
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A wall of mud, water and debris swept through part of a jungle town, leaving at least 21 people dead and about 100 missing, authorities said. A natural dam, which had formed on the Cachiyacu River, broke and a torrent devastated a portion of San Miguel, a town 425 miles north of Lima. Some residents managed to swim to safety, and 300 were left homeless. At least 83 homes were swept away.
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