Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLangston Hughes
IN THE NEWS

Langston Hughes

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1998 | Don Shirley, Don Shirley is a Times staff writer
For the first time in nearly three years, all three of the larger stages at Los Angeles Theatre Center are coming to life at the same time. The event has been dubbed "Three Plays Running" by L.A.'s Cultural Affairs Department, which runs LATC. All three productions have a connection to the work of Langston Hughes, and all are billed as events marking African American Heritage Month.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2013 | By John Horn
Fox Searchlight Pictures has commenced production in New York on the musical “Black Nativity,” director Kasi Lemmons' adaptation of the Langston Hughes play. The cast of the all-black interpretation of the nativity story includes Forest Whitaker, Angela Bassett, Jennifer Hudson, Tyrese Gibson, Luke James and singers Jacob Latimore and Nas. Lemmons also wrote the screenplay with lyrics and arrangements by rhythm and blues singer-songwriter Raphael Saadiq (the band Tony! Toni!
Advertisement
BOOKS
February 21, 1993
Well, son, I'll tell you: Life for me ain't been no crystal stair. It's had tacks in it, And splinters, And boards torn up, And places with no carpet on the floor-- Bare. But all the time I's been a-climbin' on, And reachin' landin's, And turnin' corners, And sometimes goin' in the dark Where there ain't been no light. So boy, don't you turn back. Don't you set down on the steps 'Cause you find it's kinder hard.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2009 | Associated Press
The University of Massachusetts in Amherst said Friday it would scan, catalog, digitize and put online papers of civil rights movement pioneer W.E.B. Du Bois. The university's W.E.B. Du Bois Library has an estimated 100,000 diaries, letters, photographs and other items related to Du Bois, who helped found the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People. The collection includes correspondence with other influential African Americans, such as Booker T. Washington and Langston Hughes, as well as important public figures of his day, such as Albert Einstein and Mohandas Gandhi.
BOOKS
October 28, 1990
I've known rivers: I've known rivers ancient as the world and older than the flow of human blood in human veins. My soul has grown deep like the rivers. I bathed in the Euphrates when dawns were young. I built my hut near the Congo and it lulled me to sleep. I looked upon the Nile and raised the pyramids above it. I heard the singing of the Mississippi when Abe Lincoln went down to New Orleans, and I've seen its muddy bosom turn all golden in the sunset. I've known rivers: Ancient, dusky rivers.
BOOKS
September 4, 1988 | John A. Williams, Williams' most recent novel is "Jacob's Ladder" (Thunder's Mouth Press). He has poetry and plays to his credit and has written for several newspapers and magazines, as well as for television. and
Langston Hughes died--can it be?--21 years ago. He was 65. Hughes was, of all the American writers who are black, the most beloved. No other black writer ever said so clearly to his beleaguered people both here and abroad, repeated it consistently in each aspect of his work, "I love you."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1991 | JOHN GODFREY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
During Act II of Southeast Community Theatre's "Black Nativity," cast member Yolanda Kelker lets loose with a splendid exaltation: "This (church) may be leaking," she shouts, "but--Hallelujah!--it's still standing!" Kelker's celebratory emotional outburst captures the essence of Langston Hughes' gospel musical. So, too, does Southeast Community Theatre's production. "Black Nativity," directed by Floyd Gaffney, is a heartfelt, visceral and stunningly simple celebration of the Christmas story.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2002 | Renee Tawa, Times Staff Writer
For 30 years, Altadena resident Edward Miller, a 57-year-old retired court reporter, had tucked away his late father's files on a family friend, papers that included handwritten notes signed "Lang." Finally, at the suggestion of his wife, Miller pulled the old briefcase full of files from the closet and took it to the Huntington Library in San Marino. Sue Hodson, curator of literary manuscripts, took one look and got goose bumps.
BOOKS
February 26, 1995 | Thulani Davis, Thulani Davis is the author of opera librettos, several books of poetry, and the novel "1959" (Grove Weidenfeld))
Langston Hughes is probably the best known name among African-American poets. Lionized for his genial folk language and the wry, understated rage of his later work, he has been our poet laureate for more than 50 years. But reading "The Collected Poems of Langston Hughes" is a much more interesting journey than these frozen sentiments can capture: a journey through the landscape, language, rhythms, and feelings of black America through the better part of this century.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1991
It is not surprising that, as the game of cultural, ethnic and religious separatism grows and becomes more lucrative, it is increasingly dominated by elites who show no evidence of economic disadvantage as a result of their "victimhood." The flap between African-Americans and homosexuals over the inclusion of Langston Hughes in the library's Gay/Lesbian Pride Month is a perfect example. It is a gross insensitivity for the public library to sponsor the misappropriation by the homosexual community of Langston Hughes' "dream deferred" verse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2009 | Scott Gold
For as long as he can remember, Dario Serrano's life was all screeching tires and echoing gunshots, babies' cries and barking dogs, a symphony, as he puts it, of "hood rats and gangsters," of "vatos and payasos" -- dudes and numskulls, loosely translated. By high school, he'd pretty much given up on himself. He bounced around between three schools. He started selling pot, though he always seemed to smoke more than he sold. His GPA fell to 0.
OPINION
March 13, 2005 | Jervey Tervalon, Jervey Tervalon is a novelist and the editor of a book about Los Angeles' 1992 riots, "The Geography of Rage" (RGB Books), and "The Cocaine Chronicles" (Akashic Books).
Police shoot dead an unarmed 13-year-old, and those of us who lived through the riot/uprising that set the city ablaze 13 years ago wonder if Los Angeles isn't again about to explode. Me? I don't think we are back to that flash point of rage that poet Langston Hughes once pondered. Yet. But the conditions that helped some rioters justify throwing flaming bottles through store windows, engaging in gunfights with grocers and beating a trucker with bricks haven't changed much.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2002 | Renee Tawa, Times Staff Writer
For 30 years, Altadena resident Edward Miller, a 57-year-old retired court reporter, had tucked away his late father's files on a family friend, papers that included handwritten notes signed "Lang." Finally, at the suggestion of his wife, Miller pulled the old briefcase full of files from the closet and took it to the Huntington Library in San Marino. Sue Hodson, curator of literary manuscripts, took one look and got goose bumps.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1998 | Don Shirley, Don Shirley is a Times staff writer
For the first time in nearly three years, all three of the larger stages at Los Angeles Theatre Center are coming to life at the same time. The event has been dubbed "Three Plays Running" by L.A.'s Cultural Affairs Department, which runs LATC. All three productions have a connection to the work of Langston Hughes, and all are billed as events marking African American Heritage Month.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1996
Thomas Allen Harris' "Vintage: Families of Value," a documentary on gay siblings in African American families, and Isaac Julien's "Looking for Langston," a controversial study of African American writer-poet Langston Hughes as a gay man, will be presented beginning Saturday as films on video at the Margo Leavin Gallery, 812 N. Robertson Blvd. The showings are part of a photo exhibition, "Hotter Than July," which runs Saturday through Aug. 17.
BOOKS
February 18, 1996
diamonds are mined . . . oil is discovered gold is found . . . but thoughts are uncovered wool is sheared . . . silk is spun weaving is hard . . . but words are fun highways span . . . bridges connect country roads ramble . . . but I suspect if i took a rainbow ride i could be there by your side metaphor has its point of view allusion and illusion . . . too meter . . . verse . . . classical . . .
NEWS
June 22, 1990
One of the world's best-known centers of black culture, Harlem is a community of 400,000 in the northern part of Manhattan. It has nurtured such major literary figures as Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston and James Baldwin. In the 1930s, Harlem's Cotton Club was a mecca for such musicians as Cab Calloway, Duke Ellington and Count Basie. Its Apollo Theater was a showcase for Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald and Sarah Vaughan.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1996
Thomas Allen Harris' "Vintage: Families of Value," a documentary on gay siblings in African American families, and Isaac Julien's "Looking for Langston," a controversial study of African American writer-poet Langston Hughes as a gay man, will be presented beginning Saturday as films on video at the Margo Leavin Gallery, 812 N. Robertson Blvd. The showings are part of a photo exhibition, "Hotter Than July," which runs Saturday through Aug. 17.
NEWS
August 24, 1995
Shari Roan should be congratulated for her intelligent, pull-no-punches piece "The Invisible Men" (July 10), which addressed the issue of sexual abuse or coercion by adult men as a major factor in teen-age pregnancy. When Roan reminds us that it is easier to blame pregnant teen-age girls because they are "no one's political constituents," we should hang our heads in collective shame. The implied message that abused children quickly learn is that they don't matter. They are not worth fighting for. Our children are our future--our dreams for ourselves.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|