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NEWS
March 5, 1995 | LESLIE BERESTEIN
About 70 protesters from local Filipino groups, a labor union and other activists picketed last week in front of an Orange County nursing home that banned a union representative for speaking a foreign language at the facility.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2004 | Erika Hayasaki, Times Staff Writer
Eighteen-year-old Victor Soltero grew up speaking Spanish at home. He read books in Spanish by Pablo Neruda and Gabriel Garcia Marquez. But at school, he wanted to learn a different language, like Italian or French. But at North Hollywood High School last year, those languages weren't options. Spanish is the only foreign language offered to most teenagers at the 5,000-student campus, where 71% of students are Latino.
SCIENCE
August 12, 2002 | EMILY SINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Yupik language, once common among Inuit communities on the Alaskan coast, is now spoken solely by adults. Children learn only English, making it probable that Yupik will be lost in the next generation. Yupik is one of thousands of languages that are expected to die over the next century.
NEWS
June 2, 1998
I always enjoy Paul Dean's stories, and "For the Love of Latin" (May 18) is no exception. It brings back memories of high school Latin class in the late '30s. In those days, it was a required course and to us at the time seemed outdated and tedious. Today, however, I look back with gratitude for the patience of those dear nuns. Their foresight and insistence added another dimension to my life over the ensuing years, not only in the pursuit of other languages, but in the sheer pleasure of words and thought.
NATIONAL
May 11, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The Pentagon, faced with a critical shortage of foreign language expertise, said it would increase the money it pays troops who know a language other than English. Starting June 1, the Pentagon will more than triple the foreign language incentive pay for active-duty military personnel to a maximum of $12,000 per year above their normal pay.
NEWS
December 26, 1995 | DIANE SEO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To meet the needs of their fast-growing Asian populations and to prepare students for jobs in the Pacific Rim, many California schools are expanding their foreign language programs beyond the traditional European languages. Spanish is still the most popular language by far, accounting for more than a third of the state's total foreign language enrollment. But Japanese and Chinese are the state's fastest-growing foreign languages, and other Asian languages are gaining ground.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1990 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley on Tuesday proposed a pilot program that would provide callers with interpreters of 140 languages in an effort to open city government to an expanding immigrant population. "The 3.4 million residents of Los Angeles come here from all over the world," Bradley said. "Our rich cultural and ethnic diversity is one of our greatest strengths, but it requires us to ensure our services can adapt to the wide range of people who reside here. . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1998 | SUE FOX
Soka University of America will offer five foreign language courses this fall at its Calabasas campus, including Japanese, Mandarin and Korean for beginners. For students who have already studied beginning Japanese, the university offers elementary and intermediate instruction in the language as well. The courses emphasize Asian culture, weaving discussion about current affairs, art and other topics into the study of the language.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1992 | From Associated Press
Apple Computer, Inc. went multilingual Monday with the introduction of software to let machines use dozens of languages, from complicated Arabic and Japanese to romantic French and Italian. Apple Chairman and Chief Executive John Sculley announced WorldScript at the company's annual Worldwide Developer Conference, a weeklong gathering of more than 4,000 high-tech engineers and executives from 30-plus countries. "It's the first global-ready release of software," Sculley told the developers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1995 | DEBORAH SULLIVAN
In a small classroom, students eagerly jot down words in their new language. "La fecha. La hora," the teacher writes on the board--Spanish for "the date" and "the hour." The group's members are Korean--merchants, business people, health-care professionals and others. They are studying Spanish to improve relations with their Latino clientele. "A lot of Koreans are in a small business and deal with Hispanic customers," said Dr.
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