Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLanguages
IN THE NEWS

Languages

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1990 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley on Tuesday proposed a pilot program that would provide callers with interpreters of 140 languages in an effort to open city government to an expanding immigrant population. "The 3.4 million residents of Los Angeles come here from all over the world," Bradley said. "Our rich cultural and ethnic diversity is one of our greatest strengths, but it requires us to ensure our services can adapt to the wide range of people who reside here. . . .
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1998 | SUE FOX
Soka University of America will offer five foreign language courses this fall at its Calabasas campus, including Japanese, Mandarin and Korean for beginners. For students who have already studied beginning Japanese, the university offers elementary and intermediate instruction in the language as well. The courses emphasize Asian culture, weaving discussion about current affairs, art and other topics into the study of the language.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1992 | From Associated Press
Apple Computer, Inc. went multilingual Monday with the introduction of software to let machines use dozens of languages, from complicated Arabic and Japanese to romantic French and Italian. Apple Chairman and Chief Executive John Sculley announced WorldScript at the company's annual Worldwide Developer Conference, a weeklong gathering of more than 4,000 high-tech engineers and executives from 30-plus countries. "It's the first global-ready release of software," Sculley told the developers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1995 | DEBORAH SULLIVAN
In a small classroom, students eagerly jot down words in their new language. "La fecha. La hora," the teacher writes on the board--Spanish for "the date" and "the hour." The group's members are Korean--merchants, business people, health-care professionals and others. They are studying Spanish to improve relations with their Latino clientele. "A lot of Koreans are in a small business and deal with Hispanic customers," said Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1990 | DENNIS HUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Home-video enthusiasts know that most movies currently playing in theaters will be available to them on cassette within five months to a year. Unless it's a foreign-language film they want to see. In the giant home-video business, foreign-language films are a small, specialized division.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1991 | MARY HELEN BERG
The Orange Unified School District will open a facility next week that will be one of the first stops for new students who speak a foreign language. The Language Assessment Center, which opens Wednesday, will test students in grades kindergarten through 12 for their level of fluency in English and for academic skills using their native language, as required by state law.
NEWS
April 3, 1993 | WILLIAM R. LONG and STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When Kuzakaru, a toothless, aged woman who liked to babble with children, died in 1988 on an Indian reservation along the Paraguay River in western Brazil, the Umutina language died with her--and so did the hopes of her people and linguists the world over. In a hunt to save the language, government linguist Nelmo Scher had found Kuzakaru only a year before on the reservation in Mato Grosso state. Kuzakaru, in her 70s, was the last Umutina Indian who could still speak the Umutina language.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1996
Renford Reese loves languages. He speaks about 15 of them--not perfectly, mind you, but well enough to break the ice with someone who speaks no English. Even greater than Reese's love of language, however, is his commitment to helping bridge the gaps between people who speak different languages. "Even if you don't say the statements phonetically right, trying to speak someone else's language still helps to break down barriers," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2001
Re "We Can't Squander Language Skills," Commentary, Nov. 5: My wife and I have adopted three older children from Russia. They are being offered the same choices of foreign languages as everyone else in school--French or Spanish. These children have a head start in their native language that would take years of intense work for most of us to overcome, yet the Culver City School District does nothing with this opportunity. As a returned Peace Corps volunteer, I have been unable to find resources in L.A. for maintaining proficiency in Nepali.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1993
Ethnic diversity of the San Fernando Valley is evident in the sheer number of languages spoken here. Although English is the language most often spoken at home, Spanish-speaking predominates in Sun Valley and Arleta-Pacoima. In the Los Angeles Unified School District, 87 languages and dialects are spoken by its students. The Glendale Unified School District counts 57 languages in its student population. The profusion of tongues has also lead to a flowering of language classes.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|