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Lanny Morgan

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1993 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Alto saxophonist Lanny Morgan made an impression even before his first set at Vinnie's Ristorante began. With just a few warm-up lines while he waited for his band mates to settle in, Morgan demonstrated a firm, commanding tone and an agile way of working through long, complex phrases that were impressive despite the lack of context.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1996 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like many jazz musicians, alto saxophonist Lanny Morgan doesn't work steadily as a leader, as he did when he fronted a quartet for six weeks last year in England, or even as a guest artist, as he will tonight through Saturday with Danny Pucillo's trio at Monty's Steakhouse in Woodland Hills. No, Morgan is usually a hired gun, a fine player who enlivens another's ensemble.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1996 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like many jazz musicians, alto saxophonist Lanny Morgan doesn't work steadily as a leader, as he did when he fronted a quartet for six weeks last year in England, or even as a guest artist, as he will tonight through Saturday with Danny Pucillo's trio at Monty's Steakhouse in Woodland Hills. No, Morgan is usually a hired gun, a fine player who enlivens another's ensemble.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1993 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Alto saxophonist Lanny Morgan made an impression even before his first set at Vinnie's Ristorante began. With just a few warm-up lines while he waited for his band mates to settle in, Morgan demonstrated a firm, commanding tone and an agile way of working through long, complex phrases that were impressive despite the lack of context.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1992 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lanny Morgan is a man who has come to terms with himself. Although the alto sax man has been highly visible jazz soloist for more than three decades, he feels he is now doing his finest playing. "I think I'm making better music than I ever have," Morgan says. "Sure, we all have good days and bad days. But a few days ago I listened back to some of the things I did with Maynard Ferguson back in the '60s, and I really didn't sound nearly as settled and together as I feel I am now."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1992 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The way Lanny Morgan plays the alto saxophone, you're inclined to say: "These are the good old days." Morgan, who performed Friday at Maxwell's, works mainly in the rich be-bop vein of the '40s, and his fluid approach reveals more than a smidgen of the style of Charlie Parker, that era's preeminent saxophonist, as well as such later masters as Phil Woods and Cannonball Adderley, who came along in the '50s.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1986 | LEONARD FEATHER
No question about it: Jazz is on the upswing in this city. From every point of view--quality and quantity of local and imported talent, availability of venues, coverage in the media--conditions are more encouraging than at any time in recent memory. When even the normally dour Ronnie Scott tells you he has had two good years, you know something must be going right.
NEWS
May 13, 1993 | ANNE KLARNER
In this space, it is the tradition to present noteworthy events that might otherwise be overlooked. It is not likely anyone is going to overlook this weekend's Glenfest '93. Anything that closes four city blocks in the heart of downtown Glendale from Friday to Sunday is going to stir a ripple or two.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1989 | LEONARD FEATHER
"Welcome to the world's biggest sardine can," said Bob Florence as his 17-man orchestra prepared to take on a bustling, wall-to-wall roomful of admirers at Alfonse's in North Hollywood. Any band this large must be as strong as its weakest link, Florence has no weak links, and the strongest of all is his own talent as a composer-arranger. He is a master leader who makes more of his charges than mere brass, sax and rhythm sections.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1990 | ZAN STEWART
Hey, forget Alexander's Ragtime, the band to come on and hear is Bill Holman's. If it's not the best band in the land, it shares that top spot with few others. The hirsute, sweater-clad Holman led his dynamic 17-man crew through mostly familiar territory during the first and second sets Wednesday at the Biltmore Hotel's Grand Avenue Bar--the new original "Sweet Spot" was the exception--but who cared?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1992 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The way Lanny Morgan plays the alto saxophone, you're inclined to say: "These are the good old days." Morgan, who performed Friday at Maxwell's, works mainly in the rich be-bop vein of the '40s, and his fluid approach reveals more than a smidgen of the style of Charlie Parker, that era's preeminent saxophonist, as well as such later masters as Phil Woods and Cannonball Adderley, who came along in the '50s.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1992 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lanny Morgan is a man who has come to terms with himself. Although the alto sax man has been highly visible jazz soloist for more than three decades, he feels he is now doing his finest playing. "I think I'm making better music than I ever have," Morgan says. "Sure, we all have good days and bad days. But a few days ago I listened back to some of the things I did with Maynard Ferguson back in the '60s, and I really didn't sound nearly as settled and together as I feel I am now."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1986 | LEONARD FEATHER
No question about it: Jazz is on the upswing in this city. From every point of view--quality and quantity of local and imported talent, availability of venues, coverage in the media--conditions are more encouraging than at any time in recent memory. When even the normally dour Ronnie Scott tells you he has had two good years, you know something must be going right.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
A large jazz orchestra is as viable as its library and as valid as the ability of the musicians to interpret it. As Bill Berry demonstrated Friday at Donte's, when these two requirements interact the results can make for some very healthy sounds. The cornetist's group reassembles only occasionally, with a slightly shifting dramatis personae, but the togetherness of these 16 men is positively inspiring.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
Shorty Rogers, one of the most recorded jazzmen of a generation ago, has been making a comeback in recent years. Friday, he brought a big band to Donte's; Tuesday, he led a quintet in the first of a series of live broadcasts on KKGO that will emanate weekly from the Biltmore Hotel, hosted by Chuck Niles. You could say the only thing missing Friday was Howard Rumsey on bass. Many of Rogers' and Rumsey's colleagues from the Lighthouse years were on hand: Bob Cooper, Bob Enevoldsen and Pete Jolly.
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