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Lanolin

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Researchers report they have found traces of cancer-causing pesticides in lanolin, an ointment base derived from sheep wool and used in cosmetics, pharmaceuticals and body creams. In a letter to the Journal of the American Medical Assn., the researchers said they are particularly concerned about the finding because lanolin-based ointments are "frequently used to treat sore, cracked nipples in breast-feeding mothers," and nursing babies may swallow the toxins.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Researchers report they have found traces of cancer-causing pesticides in lanolin, an ointment base derived from sheep wool and used in cosmetics, pharmaceuticals and body creams. In a letter to the Journal of the American Medical Assn., the researchers said they are particularly concerned about the finding because lanolin-based ointments are "frequently used to treat sore, cracked nipples in breast-feeding mothers," and nursing babies may swallow the toxins.
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SPORTS
February 22, 2012 | Chris Erskine
Welcome to this rite and ritual of an American spring, breaking in a new glove. As with anything in baseball, there are 100 views on the proper way to do this, all argued passionately. Glove gurus, some more guru than others, recommend treating a stiff new glove as either your best friend or roadkill. You can drown a glove, you can bake it, you can run it over with the car. Breaking in a baseball glove isn't science so much as a form of testosterone-fueled witchcraft. Tony Pena, former major league backstop and current New York Yankees bench coach, reportedly goes ape on a new catcher's glove, turning it inside out, outside in, punching, prodding, mugging it into submission — it's almost hard to watch.
NEWS
October 26, 2004
Forrest Nelson of Eagle Rock dived into the water off Arrow Point on Catalina Island at 11:30 p.m. Oct. 4 and swam 20.5 miles until he reached Point Vicente on the Palos Verdes Peninsula. During his 10-hour swim fest, he braved wind-swept waves and blew past sea lions, jellyfish and dolphins. "It was me, a Speedo, and lanolin (sheep wool grease) for an extra layer of fatty insulation," Nelson says.
BUSINESS
July 7, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Food and Drug Administration said today it is banning the sale of non-prescription creams and lotions whose manufacturers claim they grow hair or prevent baldness, because none has proven effective. The FDA said in today's Federal Register that no manufacturer has been able to show that such a product works. The ban applies to products available without a prescription that are used externally. These products are usually sold by mail or through barbers or beauticians.
MAGAZINE
August 11, 1991 | MAUREEN SAJBEL
Women who use hoof creams and mane conditioners aren't just horsing around: Many equestrian grooming products reportedly mend dry nails and revive human hair in the same way they repair cracked hooves and horse hair. "You get your hands right in the hoof cream when you're putting it on the horse's hooves," says Lisa Helfrich of West Hollywood, a TV production coordinator who noticed that her nails were less brittle after grooming her quarterhorse, Wyls.
HEALTH
January 2, 2006 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
What foods are high in selenium? I've been told this mineral may help prevent arthritis. Research presented in November at the annual meeting of the American College of Rheumatology showed that people with low selenium levels were more prone to osteoarthritis. Brazil nuts are the richest food source of this mineral, with 544 micrograms an ounce. Don't overdo, though. More than 400 micrograms of selenium daily may be excessive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2006 | Trevor Jensen, Chicago Tribune
Gerald Gidwitz, who with a partner helped start the Helene Curtis cosmetics company with clay dug out of the Arkansas River that they put in jars and sold as "Peach Bloom Facial Mask," died Tuesday of congestive heart failure. He was 99, just six days short of his long-held goal of 100. Gidwitz was chairman of Helene Curtis when the publicly traded business was sold to Unilever for $915 million in 1996.
NEWS
March 16, 1990 | THE FASHION STAFF
When six former Miss Americas joined Debbye Turner, Miss America 1990, at the May Co. this past Tuesday for a "Made in U.S.A." fashion show and to announce a May Co. $10,000 scholarship program for young women, the talk naturally turned to the beauty secrets of the tiara wearers. Jean Bartel, Miss America 1943, said she relies on lanolin for her skin. "You can buy it in a big jar at Rexall, and it only costs about eight bucks."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1997 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a city better known for strip malls and concrete, dozens of children sat down amid rolling green hills to watch a lamb lose its coat at the Pierce College farm Wednesday morning. With a flock of children looking on, Bill Lander flipped a fleecy sheep on its back, held it in a headlock and peeled off its wool with electric shears. The sheep's protesting "baaaa" impelled one little girl, thinking more about the animal's welfare than the sweater on her back, to ask: "Does that hurt?"
NEWS
April 13, 1995
T his pantyhose yarn starts in Austria, where textile businessman James Casty stumbled upon a brand that seemed to have a life of its own. They were Wolford hose, a virtual secret here but famous in Europe for never wearing out, something that can't be said for their American cousins. In 1991, he brought some back to the United States and opened Wolford Boutiques in five cities, including Costa Mesa.
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