Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLanterman Petris Short Act
IN THE NEWS

Lanterman Petris Short Act

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1990
The Southern California Psychiatric Society has become aware of the tragic circumstances that have involved the Jacobs family. Los Angeles County has undergone a shocking decrease in funding for public psychiatric care. The number of public beds in psychiatric hospitals is abysmal. Our governor has vetoed the appropriation of funds for treatment of the mentally ill. The results of this ill-conceived cost-cutting can be seen daily as more mentally ill people take to the streets, the shelters for the homeless and, alas, the jails.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2013 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
Nicholas C. Petris, who was a leading liberal voice for nearly four decades as a California state senator and assemblyman representing his hometown of Oakland and other East Bay cities, has died. He was 90. Petris, who retired in 1996 because of term limits, died Wednesday at the Oakland retirement facility where he had lived in recent years, his former chief of staff, Felice Zensius, said. The cause was old age, she said. A Greek American known for his eloquence from the floor of the state Senate, Petris championed a host of liberal causes during his career, offering legislation on behalf of the poor, the sick and the elderly.
Advertisement
OPINION
September 15, 2002
Re "A Few Good Measures," editorial, Sept. 10: Your call to the governor to sign "Laura's law" demonstrates ignorance of the law and perpetuates stigma and discrimination against individuals with psychiatric disabilities. It is false and irresponsible to state that all individuals who could be caught in the net of AB 1421 are unable to make "rational" decisions about their mental health care. Nothing in existing law prevents courts from offering or even ordering outpatient services, including medication, for individuals who cannot provide for their basic needs for food, shelter and clothing because of a lack of understanding of their diagnosis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2012 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - A homeless man plagued by schizophrenia is beaten to death by police in Fullerton. A man from Fort Bragg fixates on aliens for years while denying he is ill, then kills two men before dying in a gunfight with law enforcement. A Nevada County mental health client who had refused additional care storms into a clinic and kills three workers. Those headline grabbers, according to a task force pressing to change the California law that governs involuntary civil commitment to psychiatric hospitals, were merely the most visible signs of a broken system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2012 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - A homeless man plagued by schizophrenia is beaten to death by police in Fullerton. A man from Fort Bragg fixates on aliens for years while denying he is ill, then kills two men before dying in a gunfight with law enforcement. A Nevada County mental health client who had refused additional care storms into a clinic and kills three workers. Those headline grabbers, according to a task force pressing to change the California law that governs involuntary civil commitment to psychiatric hospitals, were merely the most visible signs of a broken system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1989
The carnage created by military-style assault weapons in city streets may yet shock California's state government into a rational regulation of firearms. One of the most welcome signs of this incipient sanity was the Assembly Public Safety Committee's recent unanimous approval of a measure, AB 497, that would help keep guns out of the hands of children, criminals and the deranged. That the endorsement of this self-evidently sensible goal by eight responsible adults can be termed historic is testimony to the effectiveness of the National Rifle Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1987
During his last 10 years in the Legislature, I served as Assemblyman Frank Lanterman's administrative assistant. We had many discussions about the Lanterman-Petris-Short Act. Lanterman had visited mental health hospitals and was appalled at what he saw. He knew of specific cases of families "putting away" Uncle Charley so they could get his money; husbands committing wives to eliminate the expenses of divorces. The commitment procedures had to be tightened. The plan for the community health centers that would dispense the necessary medication for former patients was "a consummation devoutly to be wished."
NEWS
December 17, 1987 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
In a decision that could affect thousands of the mentally ill, a state Court of Appeal ruled Wednesday that mental patients committed involuntarily to health facilities may legally refuse to take anti-psychotic drugs. The three-member panel held unanimously that patients cannot be forced to undergo such treatment except in emergencies or when a judge--not just a physician--finds they are incapable of making an informed choice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2013 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
Nicholas C. Petris, who was a leading liberal voice for nearly four decades as a California state senator and assemblyman representing his hometown of Oakland and other East Bay cities, has died. He was 90. Petris, who retired in 1996 because of term limits, died Wednesday at the Oakland retirement facility where he had lived in recent years, his former chief of staff, Felice Zensius, said. The cause was old age, she said. A Greek American known for his eloquence from the floor of the state Senate, Petris championed a host of liberal causes during his career, offering legislation on behalf of the poor, the sick and the elderly.
OPINION
May 7, 1989 | RICHARD POLANCO, Richard Polanco (D-Los Angeles) is chairman of the state Assembly's subcommittee on mental health and developmental disabilities
Less-than-subtle, pervasive radio and TV advertising regularly tries to convince parents who have "troublesome teens" that hospitalization is necessary. The ads reflect a disturbing trend in California--an increase in the admission of minors to private psychiatric facilities. As of 1988, more than 35,000 adolescents nationwide were in psychiatric treatment in the private sector. This figure has doubled since 1980, and the numbers are growing. While few would doubt that hospitalization is necessary for minors suffering from severe or acute mental disorders, what were once considered "growing pains" have today become a malady requiring hospitalization.
OPINION
September 15, 2002
Re "A Few Good Measures," editorial, Sept. 10: Your call to the governor to sign "Laura's law" demonstrates ignorance of the law and perpetuates stigma and discrimination against individuals with psychiatric disabilities. It is false and irresponsible to state that all individuals who could be caught in the net of AB 1421 are unable to make "rational" decisions about their mental health care. Nothing in existing law prevents courts from offering or even ordering outpatient services, including medication, for individuals who cannot provide for their basic needs for food, shelter and clothing because of a lack of understanding of their diagnosis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2000 | NORAH SCHUMACHER, Norah Schumacher is a resident of Granada Hills
For 32 years, the mentally ill and their families have suffered innumerable hardships because of the Lanternam-Petris-Short Act, the landmark state law that granted broad civil rights to the mentally ill. I know firsthand because I have a younger sister who developed schizophrenia in her late teens. She's 44 now. She was combative from the beginning and has been incapable of sustaining a healthy relationship even within her peer group. My sister has been lonely and angry for 25 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1990
The Southern California Psychiatric Society has become aware of the tragic circumstances that have involved the Jacobs family. Los Angeles County has undergone a shocking decrease in funding for public psychiatric care. The number of public beds in psychiatric hospitals is abysmal. Our governor has vetoed the appropriation of funds for treatment of the mentally ill. The results of this ill-conceived cost-cutting can be seen daily as more mentally ill people take to the streets, the shelters for the homeless and, alas, the jails.
OPINION
May 7, 1989 | RICHARD POLANCO, Richard Polanco (D-Los Angeles) is chairman of the state Assembly's subcommittee on mental health and developmental disabilities
Less-than-subtle, pervasive radio and TV advertising regularly tries to convince parents who have "troublesome teens" that hospitalization is necessary. The ads reflect a disturbing trend in California--an increase in the admission of minors to private psychiatric facilities. As of 1988, more than 35,000 adolescents nationwide were in psychiatric treatment in the private sector. This figure has doubled since 1980, and the numbers are growing. While few would doubt that hospitalization is necessary for minors suffering from severe or acute mental disorders, what were once considered "growing pains" have today become a malady requiring hospitalization.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1989
The carnage created by military-style assault weapons in city streets may yet shock California's state government into a rational regulation of firearms. One of the most welcome signs of this incipient sanity was the Assembly Public Safety Committee's recent unanimous approval of a measure, AB 497, that would help keep guns out of the hands of children, criminals and the deranged. That the endorsement of this self-evidently sensible goal by eight responsible adults can be termed historic is testimony to the effectiveness of the National Rifle Assn.
NEWS
December 17, 1987 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
In a decision that could affect thousands of the mentally ill, a state Court of Appeal ruled Wednesday that mental patients committed involuntarily to health facilities may legally refuse to take anti-psychotic drugs. The three-member panel held unanimously that patients cannot be forced to undergo such treatment except in emergencies or when a judge--not just a physician--finds they are incapable of making an informed choice.
OPINION
March 22, 1987 | Sherry Bebitch Jeffe, Sherry Bebitch Jeffe is director of the Study of State Legislative Leadership at the Institute of Politics and Government at USC.
Many of the people living on Los Angeles' streets lack health as well as homes. They were put there by social policy, legacies of the mid-1960s when California was a laboratory for reform--and they sit there as another reminder of reform gone awry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2000 | NORAH SCHUMACHER, Norah Schumacher is a resident of Granada Hills
For 32 years, the mentally ill and their families have suffered innumerable hardships because of the Lanternam-Petris-Short Act, the landmark state law that granted broad civil rights to the mentally ill. I know firsthand because I have a younger sister who developed schizophrenia in her late teens. She's 44 now. She was combative from the beginning and has been incapable of sustaining a healthy relationship even within her peer group. My sister has been lonely and angry for 25 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1987
During his last 10 years in the Legislature, I served as Assemblyman Frank Lanterman's administrative assistant. We had many discussions about the Lanterman-Petris-Short Act. Lanterman had visited mental health hospitals and was appalled at what he saw. He knew of specific cases of families "putting away" Uncle Charley so they could get his money; husbands committing wives to eliminate the expenses of divorces. The commitment procedures had to be tightened. The plan for the community health centers that would dispense the necessary medication for former patients was "a consummation devoutly to be wished."
OPINION
March 22, 1987 | Sherry Bebitch Jeffe, Sherry Bebitch Jeffe is director of the Study of State Legislative Leadership at the Institute of Politics and Government at USC.
Many of the people living on Los Angeles' streets lack health as well as homes. They were put there by social policy, legacies of the mid-1960s when California was a laboratory for reform--and they sit there as another reminder of reform gone awry.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|