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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The Fresno County Sheriff's Department apologized to Laotian farmers for a written statement warning property owners who rent land to them to watch for illegally grown marijuana plants. Capt. Tom Gattie said the statement inappropriately singled out a certain ethnic group. Immigrants from Laos were among those held for marijuana cultivation in a series of raids, but members of other ethnic groups also were arrested.
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FOOD
October 28, 2010 | By Miles Clements, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Thatched baskets of sticky rice arrive alongside tart pork sausages still sputtering from the pan. Papaya salad follows, the strands of green, unripened fruit stained a murky brown from fermented blue crab paste. At Tom Yum Koong in Westminster, among the offal-laden boat noodles and coconut-rich curries of Thailand are the flavors of Laos. Traffic flows past Tom Yum Koong in a stream of steel and rubber, pouring off the nearby freeway into the concrete delta of strip malls and suburban churches.
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NEWS
August 7, 1991 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A decade ago, many people considered Jack Bailey the best of men. He was praised as a humanitarian who had aided thousands of Southeast Asian refugees, hailed as a hero who had given desperate people a chance to live. One missionary called him "the most genuinely compassionate man I ever met." Then that Jack Bailey seemed to all but vanish, sinking into the murky realm where Americans haunted by Vietnam try to raise the dead--the presumed dead, that is.
NEWS
September 10, 2010
Asian Americans are known to have disproportionate numbers of liver cancers because of the high incidence of hepatitis B in that population, but new data indicate that Laotian Americans and Hmong Americans have even higher numbers and are more than twice as likely as other Asian Americans to die of it. Moreover, the disease tends to be diagnosed in those two groups at a late stage when it has already spread and they are less likely to receive treatment, UC...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1985 | From Reuters
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev held talks Tuesday with Laotian Premier Kaysone Phomvihan, the official Tass news agency reported without providing details.
NEWS
March 25, 1987 | United Press International
Laotian Deputy Foreign Minister Soubanh Srithirath arrived in Bangkok on Tuesday for a four-day visit and talks aimed at improving relations.
NEWS
May 24, 2000 | From Associated Press
Capping a 10-year effort, the House gave final approval Tuesday to legislation that would make it easier for Laotians who fought with America during the Vietnam War to become U.S. citizens. President Clinton is expected to sign it. The bill, which passed without objection, waives the English-language requirement for Laotians recruited by the CIA for covert military actions during the war. Most of the Laotians are Hmong, an ethnic group.
NEWS
November 30, 1986 | United Press International
Thailand and Laos completed two days of high-level talks Saturday aimed at reducing tension and improving bilateral relations. Thai news reports on the talks in the Laotian capital said the two countries agreed to reduce trade barriers and to guarantee peaceful use of the Mekong River that forms most of their common border.
NEWS
March 26, 1989 | From United Press International
The first legislative elections in Laos since the Communist Party seized power in 1975, scheduled for today, are being seen as a reluctant response to the trend toward democracy in the Soviet Union and Vietnam, the country's main allies. "We feel the election is necessary to consolidate state power and further develop democracy," said Somsavat Lengsavath, deputy prime minister.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1988 | DAVID HALDANE, Times Staff Writer
The first rehearsal began in silence. Separated by a chasm of language and culture, the two groups of musicians clustered shyly at opposite sides of the room to unpack their instruments. The musical collection at one end included a clarinet, saxophone, flute, drums, cello and electric keyboard.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2009 | Tom Roston
It is tempting to form an opinion about director of photography Ellen Kuras by the company she keeps. Martin Scorsese has employed her on a couple of films (including his Rolling Stones documentary, "Shine a Light"), she's been a regular hire for directors Spike Lee and Michel Gondry for years, and she recently shot Sam Mendes' upcoming film "Away We Go."
NEWS
August 19, 2007 | Rungrawee C. Pinyorat, Associated Press
It was the fear of persecution that drove Yang Pahua to flee her native Laos -- twice. Yang, 17, is one of 21 girls and five boys whose stories have drawn new attention to the plight of the Hmong, an ethnic minority. Their families first fled Laos in 2004 for an informal refugee settlement in the Thai province of Phetchabun. The youths were sent back to Laos in December 2005. In June this year, it emerged that a dozen of them had run away again. They have now made it back to Phetchabun.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Former Laotian Gen. Vang Pao, accused of being the ringleader in a plot to overthrow the communist government of Laos, was freed on bail Friday. U.S. Magistrate Judge Dale A. Drozd ordered the 77-year-old leader of the Hmong community in the U.S. released on a $1.5-million bond after relatives agreed to post four properties in Sacramento, Fresno and Westminster as collateral.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2007 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge Thursday ordered the release under house arrest of Gen. Vang Pao and half a dozen other aging expatriates accused of plotting a violent coup against the communist government of Laos. Magistrate Judge Dale A. Drozd concluded that Vang Pao, 77, who fought in the Royal Lao Army alongside U.S. troops during the Vietnam War and appeared in court stooped in a wheelchair, did not pose a danger or flight risk and approved his release on $1.5-million bail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2007 | Tony Barboza and Ashley Powers, Times Staff Writers
Vang Pao, a key figure among those arrested Monday on suspicion of plotting the overthrow of the communist Laotian government, is so well-known in the local Hmong community that his family always keeps fruit, soda and water on the living room coffee table to greet the constant stream of visitors who drop by his Westminster home.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2005 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
The History Channel's new series, "Heroes Under Fire," makes its debut tonight with a gem, "Jungle Ambush," about a U.S. Special Forces mission into Laos during the Vietnam War that turned into a savage fight for survival. Seen from the safe distance of time, what happened that day in October 1968 in the A Shau Valley probably had little military significance. "Jungle Ambush" makes no claims otherwise.
NEWS
April 4, 1991 | United Press International
U.S. and Laotian experts began the first joint search Wednesday for evidence of the fates of Americans believed captured by Communist Laotian forces during the Indochina War, the U.S. Embassy said. Since 1985, the government of Laos has helped search for the remains of men killed in air crashes but has never agreed to help look into the cases of men believed to have been captured. Now a five-man U.S. team will conduct a nine-day investigation.
NEWS
April 19, 1985 | Associated Press
The Laotian deputy defense minister and the army chief of staff were killed in northwestern Laos last month when rebels hit their helicopter with artillery fire, the Bangkok World newspaper reported Thursday. The English-language daily, quoting an unidentified military source, said the helicopter carrying Brig. Gen. Ai Souryaseng, the deputy defense minister, and Brig. Gen. Sithone Manolar, the army chief of staff, struck a mountain during the attack.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2004 | Teresa Watanabe and Nancy Wride, Times Staff Writers
Indian Americans have surged forward as the most successful Asian minority in the United States, reporting top levels of income, education, professional job status and English-language ability, even though three-fourths were foreign-born, according to U.S. census data released Wednesday. The striking success of Asian Americans who trace their heritage to India contrasted with data showing struggles among Cambodian, Laotian and Hmong immigrants.
FOOD
August 25, 2004 | Russ Parsons, Times Staff Writer
Green beans that grow a yard long and also come in purple; melons that look like spiny cucumbers and when ripe turn bright orange, with huge pomegranate-red seeds; squash that can be eaten like zucchini when it's young or used as a bath sponge later -- can this really be a farm in Fresno? That is where we are, and yard-long beans, bitter melon and loofah are growing in profusion, along with gai lan, daikon, eggplants of every color and shape, and exotic mints, basils and other herbs.
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