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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2013 | By Richard Winton, Andrew Blankstein and Joel Rubin, Los Angeles Times
On a day in early January, a man walked up to the front door of a South Bay home and knocked. The homeowner, a captain in the Los Angeles Police Department, looked outside. Although the two had met before, the captain didn't recognize the large black man standing in his walkway and waited behind the closed door until he left. Weeks passed, and the 23-year veteran of the LAPD thought nothing more of the encounter. About a month later, the face he had seen outside his home was everywhere - staring out from the front pages of newspapers, TV screens and wanted signs on billboards throughout the city.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2014 | By Kate Mather and Matt Stevens
LAPD Asst. Chief Michel Moore described Monday's Hollywood Hills shooting, in which one officer was injured, as a sudden and unprovoked attack. Moore, filling in for Chief Charlie Beck at Tuesday's Police Commission meeting, said investigators were still looking into the circumstances surrounding the incident, which occurred as o fficers were responding to a domestic violence call in the 8100 block of Gould Avenue about 8 a.m. ...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2008 | Hector Becerra
A taxi driver who picked up a fare Friday night was found shot to death in his cab moments later, police said. Andres Delamadrid, 37, crashed his cab in the 3400 block of Gleason Avenue in Boyle Heights after being shot in the chest, said LAPD officials. The motive for his killing is under investigation. LAPD Capt. Blake Chow said the car was an illegal, unlicensed taxi. -- Hector Beccera
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2013 | By Richard Winton, Kate Mather and Andrew Blankstein
The two suspects in the kidnapping and sexual assault of a 10-year-old girl have extensive criminal records. The prime suspect in last week's kidnapping and sexual assault of a 10-year-old Northridge girl may be in the San Diego area, authorities said Monday. A statement from the Los Angeles Police Department did not detail why authorities believe Tobias Dustin Summers , 30, could be in San Diego, saying only that investigators "have reason to believe" he might be. Summers "may also have changed his appearance by shaving his head," the statement said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2009 | Joel Rubin
A veteran Los Angeles police officer involved in a controversial shooting more than a decade ago opened fire last week on a group of robbery suspects after one allegedly brandished a gun, according to police. In the afternoon of Aug. 6, Det. Jeff Nolte and his partner, Det. Donald Walthers, who both have worked as LAPD officers for about 20 years, were tracking a group of people suspected in a series of recent robberies in South Los Angeles. The pair were assigned to the department's elite Special Investigation Section.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1998 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Police Commission on Tuesday approved a proposed $1.4-billion departmental budget for 1999-2000 that would add 231 police officers to the LAPD, nearly double the number of department psychologists and staff a new bureau in the San Fernando Valley. The proposed budget represents a nearly 20% increase in direct costs from this year, rather than the 2% cut Mayor Richard Riordan has directed city department heads to make.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1998 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After sorting through nine reports and hundreds of reform recommendations stretching back seven years, Los Angeles police officials have mapped out a strategy to implement about 115 proposals aimed at improving police operations. The effort by Chief Bernard C. Parks is intended to put to rest issues raised by the 1991 blue-ribbon Christopher Commission and other studies of the Los Angeles Police Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1999
The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department on Wednesday blamed the Los Angeles Police Department for the mistaken release of a suspected drug kingpin arrested in the largest cocaine seizure in Long Beach history. The Sheriff's Department said that Salvador Gomez was "identified for release by LAPD" last Thursday. As a result, sheriff's officials released Gomez from the Parker Center Video Arraignment Court, where he was being held along with five other suspects in the case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1998
A Superior Court judge on Tuesday barred the Los Angeles Police Department from posting the photographs of community liaison officers on its Internet site. Officials with the Los Angeles Police Protective League--the LAPD's main union--requested the preliminary injunction, arguing that posting the photographs could put those officers in jeopardy and infringe on their privacy rights.
NEWS
July 27, 2010 | By David Sarno, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
A City Council review of Google Inc.'s $7.25-million contract to take over the city's e-mail system has been pushed back by eight days to August 4. Council members were scheduled on Tuesday to review the status of the implementation, which was supposed to be finished by the end of June. The rollout of Google's Apps software to the city's 30,000 employees ran into delays as Google and the city negotiated over how to secure sensitive data from the Los Angeles Police Department and other city agencies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2013 | By Andrew Blankstein and Kate Mather, Los Angeles Times
LAPD's 'Southland' cameo is a different police shooting Los Angeles police Chief Charlie Beck took his place behind the lectern. Cameras flashed. Reporters stood at the ready. But Beck's news conference in front of Parker Center, the old LAPD headquarters, wasn't a typical meeting with the media. For one, it wasn't real. The chief and other officials with the Los Angeles Police Department filmed a cameo Friday for the season finale of TNT's L.A.-based police drama, "Southland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2013 | By Richard Winton, Andrew Blankstein and Joel Rubin, Los Angeles Times
On a day in early January, a man walked up to the front door of a South Bay home and knocked. The homeowner, a captain in the Los Angeles Police Department, looked outside. Although the two had met before, the captain didn't recognize the large black man standing in his walkway and waited behind the closed door until he left. Weeks passed, and the 23-year veteran of the LAPD thought nothing more of the encounter. About a month later, the face he had seen outside his home was everywhere - staring out from the front pages of newspapers, TV screens and wanted signs on billboards throughout the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2013 | By Andrew Blankstein and Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles police are recalibrating their response to some emergency calls in light of a series of prank "swatting" calls reporting violent incidents at the homes of celebrities such as Ashton Kutcher, Justin Bieber and now Chris Brown. Officers will continue to respond immediately, in large numbers and with force if needed, to reports of crime at the homes of such VIPs, top Los Angeles Police Department officials said. But they are trying to warn officers more quickly in cases where an emergency call appears to have the hallmarks of swatting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2012 | Joel Rubin, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles Police Department's news release on an Oct. 12 officer-involved shooting seemed fairly routine. Officers searching for several suspects who had fled after being stopped for questioning found one hiding under an SUV on Woodlawn Avenue in South L.A. The officers pulled the suspect out by his ankles, saw what looked like a metallic object in his hands and opened fire, critically wounding him. But one crucial piece of information was...
OPINION
September 17, 2012 | Jim Newton
Back in the early 1990s, when the Los Angeles Police Department was the source of much fear and brutality, about 1% of its arrests involved the use of some force, from a firm grip to a gunshot. Over the last two years, during a period when the LAPD has been justifiably lauded as a restrained and professional agency, about 1% of arrests involved the use of force. That remarkable constancy is true despite wide fluctuations in the number of people taken into custody - the department arrested almost 300,000 people in 1990, twice as many as last year - and reflects two aspects of the interaction between police and the public: Most officers do their jobs with good intentions, and most suspects know better than to resist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2012 | By Joel Rubin, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles Police Department on Tuesday made its case for why officers often are given warnings, instead of suspensions, for drunk driving, domestic disputes and other serious types of misconduct. Deputy Chief Mark Perez appeared before the civilian Police Commission, which oversees the LAPD and has raised concerns in recent months about the department's unconventional approach to disciplining officers. Perez presented preliminary discipline figures that, he said, showed officers who received the warnings recommitted the same type of misconduct far less often than those who were suspended.
NEWS
September 17, 1997
Gov. Pete Wilson, whose office recently helped the Los Angeles Police Department acquire 600 U.S. Army surplus M-16s, said Tuesday that the powerful assault rifles will give police a fighting chance against today's heavily armed criminals. "Never, ever again do I want to see officers from the Los Angeles Police Department outgunned," said Wilson, referring to the Feb. 28 North Hollywood shootout in which a pair of armor-clad bank robbers terrorized officers with assault rifles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1998 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Police Department is "sloppy" when it comes to storing and accounting for guns, drugs, jewelry, electronic equipment and other property seized by police, the city's controller said Wednesday. A 35-page audit released by Controller Rick Tuttle found that the LAPD's supervision of property has internal weaknesses that jeopardize the success of criminal prosecutions and create easy opportunities for abuse and theft.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2012 | By Kate Linthicum and David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
Setting the stage for a battle with city employees and fellow elected officials, Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa called Friday for the elimination of 669 city jobs - 231 through layoffs - even as he also sought to add police officers and restore some Fire Department services. The bulk of the job cuts proposed in the mayor's new $7.2-billion budget would affect civilian employees at the Los Angeles Police Department, where 159 clerks, secretaries and other administrators would be put out of work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2011 | By Andrew Blankstein and Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
Most of the surveillance cameras installed in downtown Los Angeles as part of an effort to help police crack down on crime have not been working for two years, according to interviews and records reviewed by The Times. The cameras were installed over the last few years in a highly publicized partnership between local business groups, which purchased them, and the Los Angeles Police Department, which was to monitor and maintain them. But officials said the majority of the cameras don't work.
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