Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLapis Press
IN THE NEWS

Lapis Press

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1991 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic writes about art for The Times
"I'm a spender. I spend myself," Sam Francis says in a moment of self-assessment. Those who know him best agree. The 67-year-old artist travels too extensively, reads too widely, inquires too deeply, supports too many cultural and charitable projects, cultivates friendships too carefully, marries too often and--until a recent illness forced him into a diet and exercise regimen--eats and drinks too much to be a model of moderation.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Robert Shapazian, a scholarly art dealer who started importing art at age 13 and went on to become the founding director of the Gagosian Gallery in Beverly Hills, has died. He was 67. Shapazian died of lung cancer Saturday at his Los Angeles home, said Robert Dean, a friend. "Robert just kind of sailed under the radar a bit," said Dean, who also was a colleague at the Gagosian. "He's more like a poet's poet, if the poets were collectors. He both influenced and inspired a lot of people."
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Robert Shapazian, a scholarly art dealer who started importing art at age 13 and went on to become the founding director of the Gagosian Gallery in Beverly Hills, has died. He was 67. Shapazian died of lung cancer Saturday at his Los Angeles home, said Robert Dean, a friend. "Robert just kind of sailed under the radar a bit," said Dean, who also was a colleague at the Gagosian. "He's more like a poet's poet, if the poets were collectors. He both influenced and inspired a lot of people."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1991 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic writes about art for The Times
"I'm a spender. I spend myself," Sam Francis says in a moment of self-assessment. Those who know him best agree. The 67-year-old artist travels too extensively, reads too widely, inquires too deeply, supports too many cultural and charitable projects, cultivates friendships too carefully, marries too often and--until a recent illness forced him into a diet and exercise regimen--eats and drinks too much to be a model of moderation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2000
Jan Butterfield, 63, an art writer, critic and former executive director of the Lapis Press. Born in Santa Monica, Butterfield graduated from UCLA, where she majored in theater arts. After working at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art for a number of years, she moved to Fort Worth in the 1970s to become an art critic for the Fort Worth Star Telegram. As a contributor to Art News and Art in America, she helped bring national attention to a young Texas art scene.
BOOKS
January 31, 1988
From "Divisions on a Ground" (The Lapis Press, 2058 Broadway, Santa Monica 90404: $18; 50 pp.). Edith Jenkins, a fourth-generation San Franciscan, has four children and six grandchildren and "has been active in progressive causes throughout her life." She has published poetry before in magazines. This is her first book. Your fingers are pink succulents. When your mother opens them they curl around her long, pale finger. Your nails are luminous, ancestral.
BOOKS
February 9, 1992 | MICHAEL HARRIS
A WITCH by August Strindberg, translated from the Swedish by Mary Sandbach (Lapis Press: $45; 117 pp.) . The playwright August Strindberg (1849-1912) also wrote much fiction, including this little-known novella that appeared in 1890. According to the publisher's notes for this first English translation of "A Witch," Strindberg had written it three years earlier (shortly before his play "Miss Julie"), in turmoil over whether to divorce his unfaithful wife.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1987 | KRISTINE McKENNA
As a young woman who'd migrated from her home in Illinois to New York City, Dorothea Tanning was mightily impressed by the Museum of Modern Art's landmark exhibition of 1936, "Fantastic Art, Dada, Surrealism." "It was like lightning striking," recalls the artist, now 76. Lightning obviously struck Tanning a second time in 1942 when she met modernist master Max Ernst, whom she subsequently married.
NEWS
September 12, 1993 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Shapazian runs his hands lovingly over the dust jacket of "Albucius," a recent title from the Venice-based Lapis Press. Written in the voice of a perverse patrician in ancient Rome, the text is illustrated with strange, erotic photos, including the dust-jacket photo of a nude woman lashed to the back of a horse. The result is a book that Shapazian proudly describes as "visually odd and voluptuous." In Shapazian's enthusiastically unorthodox view, odd is devoutly to be wished.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1996 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Sam Francis died two years ago, ending a painting career that spanned half a century and brought him international renown, but he still has a vital presence. In the first commercial exhibition of artworks drawn from the artist's estate, the Gagosian Gallery in Beverly Hills is presenting large abstractions from 1965-83 that might have been designed for the gallery's soaring, light-filled space. Francis is also a player in this week's contemporary art auctions in New York.
MAGAZINE
November 16, 2003 | Susan Heeger
For Tony and Mona Nicholas, house, garden and children arrived in that order. In 1992, they bought a 1950s Benedict Canyon ranch-style house. Architect Michael Maltzan was hired to pare it down and lighten it up, editing out walls, adding windows and glass doors, and updating bathrooms and the kitchen. Two years later, with help from landscape designer Melinda Taylor, the Nicholases broke ground on the garden, and once plants were in their beds, Mona went into labor with daughter Oona, now 8.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1994 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
The San Diego Museum of Art will join the digital age on Wednesday with a public unveiling of its Interactive Multimedia Art Gallery Explorer (IMAGE) Gallery. Visitors to the new first-floor installation will find a series of information systems equipped with Macintosh Power PCs that offer easy access to 300 works in the museum's collection.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|