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ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1990 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Pathfinder," which is playing at the Fine Arts in Beverly Hills, is a starkly beautiful retelling of a 1,000-year-old Lapp coming-of-age saga set above the Arctic Circle. The film won a 1988 Oscar nomination for writer-director Nils Gaup and producer John M. Jacobsen and now it has brought the pair from Oslo to California, where they are completing Gaup's second film for Walt Disney Studios.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2005 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Marc Alan Lappe, a toxicologist, author and medical ethicist who fought for public policies that promote a clean and healthy environment, died Saturday. He was 62. Lappe was diagnosed with brain cancer in August and died at his home in Gualala, Calif., said his son, Anthony.
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FOOD
May 10, 2000 | CHARLES PERRY
The remotest people in Europe are the Lapps of northern Scandinavia, who were still mostly nomads until the 20th century. The Lapps were so out of the loop they didn't even start using flour in their cookery until the 17th century, and for a long time after that, all they did with it was roll out a sort of tortilla and "bake" it on a plank set near the fire, the way American fishermen sometimes "plank" fish.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2004 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Ralph E. Lapp, who helped create atomic weapons from the early days of the Manhattan Project and then spent his life informing the public about the dangers of fallout but touting the relative safety of nuclear power, has died. He was 87. Lapp died Sept. 7 in Alexandria, Va., of pneumonia following surgery. A native of Buffalo, N.Y., Lapp was a graduate of the University of Chicago, where he also earned his PhD.
TRAVEL
July 22, 1990
I happened to catch the Times Shopper article on Sami crafts by Jennifer Merin in the June 24 Travel Section. By fortuitous coincidence, I discovered a Lapp (Sami) movie at the Laemmle Fine Arts Theatre: "Pathfinder." The movie recounts a 1,000-year-old Lapp legend of a young boy who saves his people from murderous invaders and features Lapp actors speaking the Lapp language. It's a fascinating view of another time and culture. Anyone who found your article on the Sami traditional techniques in craft-making interesting would enjoy "Pathfinder" as well.
NEWS
September 23, 1990 | EVA JANZON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lapps say their lot has changed in 30 years from open discrimination to a subtler atmosphere in which they are ignored or shunned. In the old days, Lapp children were punished if they spoke their native language at school. The sooner the better was the official attitude toward Lapps learning Swedish ways. Now, the arctic reindeer herders say, both officials and Swedes in general seem to be avoiding them. Lapps say they are not consulted about matters concerning their northern wilderness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2004 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Ralph E. Lapp, who helped create atomic weapons from the early days of the Manhattan Project and then spent his life informing the public about the dangers of fallout but touting the relative safety of nuclear power, has died. He was 87. Lapp died Sept. 7 in Alexandria, Va., of pneumonia following surgery. A native of Buffalo, N.Y., Lapp was a graduate of the University of Chicago, where he also earned his PhD.
NEWS
June 27, 1987 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
Outside the community center, in the Arctic summer sun, stood an array of vehicles that included pickup trucks, Volvo station wagons and an Audi with the antlers of a reindeer on the back seat. Inside, a group of Lapp villagers had met to talk about the invisible peril that descended on them and their reindeer herds just over a year ago: radiation from the April, 1986, nuclear disaster at Chernobyl, in the Soviet Union.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2005 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Marc Alan Lappe, a toxicologist, author and medical ethicist who fought for public policies that promote a clean and healthy environment, died Saturday. He was 62. Lappe was diagnosed with brain cancer in August and died at his home in Gualala, Calif., said his son, Anthony.
NEWS
February 1, 1987 | LARS FOYEN, Associated Press
Lapp herdsmen saw nothing out of the ordinary when snow began falling on their grazing reindeer in the northern Swedish wilderness last April 27. In the following days, however, they got the news that plunged them into despair they still feel today. The news was about the Chernobyl nuclear accident in the Soviet Ukraine, almost 1,300 miles away, and radiation in the snow could turn much of the meat of their 275,000 reindeer into radioactive waste for years to come.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2003 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
A film about three people stranded at the crossroads of life and death during wartime, the Russian film "The Cuckoo" opens with a group of World War II soldiers chaining a man to a rock. Without explanation, the Finnish regulars have sentenced the would-be Sisyphus, a sniper, to perish amid the wild beauty of Lapland.
FOOD
May 10, 2000 | CHARLES PERRY
The remotest people in Europe are the Lapps of northern Scandinavia, who were still mostly nomads until the 20th century. The Lapps were so out of the loop they didn't even start using flour in their cookery until the 17th century, and for a long time after that, all they did with it was roll out a sort of tortilla and "bake" it on a plank set near the fire, the way American fishermen sometimes "plank" fish.
NEWS
July 26, 1996 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The French, of course, have a phrase for it: Mal dans sa peau. To be, literally, bad in one's skin, a phrase that attributes more psychological and physiological importance to that organ than most of us care to acknowledge. It's bad enough when the obsession lacks depth, as in a silly superficial preoccupation with, say, beauty or aging (no one you or I know spends any time thinking about these things).
NEWS
July 24, 1996 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
It's the era of skin worship. Bare skin. Tanned skin. Pierced skin. Tattooed skin. Mutilated. Dermabraded. Shaved and decorated. What Americans are doing to their skin these days is no less than a cultural revolution, says the scientist and philosopher Marc Lappe. After two centuries honoring Puritan ideals and even purer skin, we're obsessed with painting a picture of our souls on our bodily palates. To some, this trend is cool. To others, merely fascinating. But is it healthy?
NEWS
December 20, 1992 | MATTI HUUHTANEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
To modern children, the image of reindeer flashing across the sky means all the good things of Christmas. To the ancient Lapps, it meant fear, awe, maybe even the end of the world. When Lapp wise men spoke of reindeer in the stars, it was not a tale of comfort and joy, or Santa the jolly elf, but of a race against doomsday.
NEWS
September 23, 1990 | EVA JANZON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lapps say their lot has changed in 30 years from open discrimination to a subtler atmosphere in which they are ignored or shunned. In the old days, Lapp children were punished if they spoke their native language at school. The sooner the better was the official attitude toward Lapps learning Swedish ways. Now, the arctic reindeer herders say, both officials and Swedes in general seem to be avoiding them. Lapps say they are not consulted about matters concerning their northern wilderness.
NEWS
June 5, 1989 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, Times Staff Writer
In 1971, Frances Moore Lappe turned her one-page handout on the causes of world hunger into a book that she figured "would appeal to maybe 500 people around the Bay Area," where she was then a graduate-school dropout. Rooted in the thesis that hunger exists in the world not because of overpopulation or insufficient food production but because of a wasteful fixation on meat production, "Diet for a Small Planet" was an odd mix of ethical, political and economic analysis, autobiographical details and recipes for mung beans, tofu, grains and legumes.
NEWS
August 5, 1990 | ALISTER DOYLE, REUTERS
Norway's Lapps, struggling to maintain their ancient Arctic traditions of fishing and reindeer herding, have an unexpected problem--a reindeer population boom. "We have too many reindeer," said Kjell Saether, mayor of Karasjok, a town set among amid stunted pine and birch trees where temperatures can plunge to 60 degrees below zero in the permanent winter darkness.
NEWS
August 5, 1990 | ALISTER DOYLE, REUTERS
Norway's Lapps, struggling to maintain their ancient Arctic traditions of fishing and reindeer herding, have an unexpected problem--a reindeer population boom. "We have too many reindeer," said Kjell Saether, mayor of Karasjok, a town set among amid stunted pine and birch trees where temperatures can plunge to 60 degrees below zero in the permanent winter darkness.
TRAVEL
July 22, 1990
I happened to catch the Times Shopper article on Sami crafts by Jennifer Merin in the June 24 Travel Section. By fortuitous coincidence, I discovered a Lapp (Sami) movie at the Laemmle Fine Arts Theatre: "Pathfinder." The movie recounts a 1,000-year-old Lapp legend of a young boy who saves his people from murderous invaders and features Lapp actors speaking the Lapp language. It's a fascinating view of another time and culture. Anyone who found your article on the Sami traditional techniques in craft-making interesting would enjoy "Pathfinder" as well.
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