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November 15, 1999 | ARMANDO ACUNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Of all the people to pick a fight with, a feisty, fledgling Latino magazine based in this progressive seaside town chose Goliath--one of Mexico's richest and most powerful families. El Andar, a bilingual quarterly with a circulation of 10,000, big dreams and a tiny staff, published a story in its fall issue accusing the wealthy Hank family of corruption on both sides of the border.
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NEWS
November 15, 1999 | ARMANDO ACUNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Of all the people to pick a fight with, a feisty, fledgling Latino magazine based in this progressive seaside town chose Goliath--one of Mexico's richest and most powerful families. El Andar, a bilingual quarterly with a circulation of 10,000, big dreams and a tiny staff, published a story in its fall issue accusing the wealthy Hank family of corruption on both sides of the border.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2001 | From Associated Press
Carlos Hank Gonzalez, a flamboyant millionaire and politician who helped shape Mexico's once-dominant PRI party, has died. He was 73. Hank Gonzalez died of cancer Saturday at his ranch in the Mexico City suburb of Santiago Tianguistenco, his family announced. Further details were not immediately available.
NEWS
July 1, 1991 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the John H. Sununu travel flap clearly demonstrates, American corporations seeking influence in Washington increasingly are using a currency even more valuable than campaign contributions: the corporate jet. Like White House Chief of Staff Sununu, a number of high-ranking Bush Administration officials and members of Congress often rely on corporate aircraft to ferry them around the country for personal, political or official purposes. They include Commerce Secretary Robert A.
BUSINESS
October 15, 2000 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
WASHINGTON There was scoffing at first, but the proposal by Mexico's president-elect, Vicente Fox, to open the borders and adopt the U.S. dollar throughout North America is getting increasingly serious attention. Fox's ideas have sparked new thought among many in the United States--from economists and demographers to local government officials and business executives--about concepts that had been considered largely unthinkable.
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