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BUSINESS
October 9, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Largo Entertainment Expands Slate: Producer Lawrence Gordon's Largo Entertainment is expected to double its output to at least six pictures a year under a new agreement with its Japanese backers, JVC/Victor Co. of Japan. Sources valued the funding package at more than $100 million. "This is a hit- driven business . . . and we want to have as many opportunities as possible to achieve a breakout picture," Gordon said.
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BUSINESS
January 13, 1994 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Film producer Lawrence Gordon resigned Wednesday as chief executive of Largo Entertainment--the first major Hollywood venture backed by Japanese money during the free-spending 1980s--for an exclusive production deal at Universal Pictures. The move had been expected for weeks, as rumors circulated in Hollywood that Largo was running out of cash due to a dearth of hits and a financial drain from overhead costs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON, Times Staff Writer
The electronics firm JVC/Victor Co. of Japan today will disclose plans for the largest Japanese investment in Hollywood to date--an injection of more than $100 million in a new film company to be run by former 20th Century Fox president Lawrence Gordon. Gordon, who has produced such films as "Field of Dreams," "Die Hard" and "48 Hours," said JVC's investment in the new company, Largo Entertainment, was worth "well in excess of $100 million, with plenty more capital to expand."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1992 | Terry Pristin
Spike Lee's movies have never excited a lot of interest abroad, which is probably why Warner Bros. happily pre-sold foreign rights to "Malcolm X" to Largo International. Last spring, after screening the film biography of the slain black leader, Warners executives tried in vain to get those rights back. Largo officials now believe they have a major sensation on their hands. Several weeks before the film's Nov.
NEWS
April 19, 1990 | MICHAEL CIEPLY
How does a million-dollar script get written? For Brian Helgeland and Manny Coto, it began with a phone conversation last fall. "I said, 'Let's not hang up until we come up with an idea we can sell for a million dollars,' " Helgeland recalled. Helgeland had previously written "Nightmare on Elm Street, Part IV" and other scripts, and the pair had collaborated in 1988 on a horror-comedy called "Freuds" that didn't sell. During the phone conversation, Coto asked, "What if a missile became sentient?"
BUSINESS
January 13, 1994 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Film producer Lawrence Gordon resigned Wednesday as chief executive of Largo Entertainment--the first major Hollywood venture backed by Japanese money during the free-spending 1980s--for an exclusive production deal at Universal Pictures. The move had been expected for weeks, as rumors circulated in Hollywood that Largo was running out of cash due to a dearth of hits and a financial drain from overhead costs.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON
When JVC/Victor Co. of Japan last year reduced prices on the American videos it distributes in Japan, Japanese customers lined up to buy "Roman Holiday," the Gregory Peck-Audrey Hepburn romance that first appeared in theaters 36 years ago. The Paramount video outsold "Flashdance," "Raiders of the Lost Ark," even "Back to the Future." If the forward-looking Japanese needed any more reason to invest in American movie production, this was it: Quality Hollywood films hold their value for decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1992 | Terry Pristin
Spike Lee's movies have never excited a lot of interest abroad, which is probably why Warner Bros. happily pre-sold foreign rights to "Malcolm X" to Largo International. Last spring, after screening the film biography of the slain black leader, Warners executives tried in vain to get those rights back. Largo officials now believe they have a major sensation on their hands. Several weeks before the film's Nov.
BUSINESS
October 9, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Largo Entertainment Expands Slate: Producer Lawrence Gordon's Largo Entertainment is expected to double its output to at least six pictures a year under a new agreement with its Japanese backers, JVC/Victor Co. of Japan. Sources valued the funding package at more than $100 million. "This is a hit- driven business . . . and we want to have as many opportunities as possible to achieve a breakout picture," Gordon said.
NEWS
April 19, 1990 | MICHAEL CIEPLY
How does a million-dollar script get written? For Brian Helgeland and Manny Coto, it began with a phone conversation last fall. "I said, 'Let's not hang up until we come up with an idea we can sell for a million dollars,' " Helgeland recalled. Helgeland had previously written "Nightmare on Elm Street, Part IV" and other scripts, and the pair had collaborated in 1988 on a horror-comedy called "Freuds" that didn't sell. During the phone conversation, Coto asked, "What if a missile became sentient?"
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON
When JVC/Victor Co. of Japan last year reduced prices on the American videos it distributes in Japan, Japanese customers lined up to buy "Roman Holiday," the Gregory Peck-Audrey Hepburn romance that first appeared in theaters 36 years ago. The Paramount video outsold "Flashdance," "Raiders of the Lost Ark," even "Back to the Future." If the forward-looking Japanese needed any more reason to invest in American movie production, this was it: Quality Hollywood films hold their value for decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON, Times Staff Writer
The electronics firm JVC/Victor Co. of Japan today will disclose plans for the largest Japanese investment in Hollywood to date--an injection of more than $100 million in a new film company to be run by former 20th Century Fox president Lawrence Gordon. Gordon, who has produced such films as "Field of Dreams," "Die Hard" and "48 Hours," said JVC's investment in the new company, Largo Entertainment, was worth "well in excess of $100 million, with plenty more capital to expand."
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