Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLarry Andersen
IN THE NEWS

Larry Andersen

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
December 21, 1990 | From Times Wire Service
Moving to fill a void in right-handed relief, the San Diego Padres today signed free-agent pitcher Larry Andersen to a two-year contract. The deal includes a club option for the 1993 season. Terms were not released but the two sides had discussed a yearly salary of about $2 million. Andersen, 37, spent most of the 1990 season with Houston, where he was 5-2 with six saves and a 1.95 ERA in 50 relief appearances.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
August 17, 1992 | BOB NIGHTENGALE
Padre reliever Larry Andersen is ready for the news. After the season ends, Padre General Manager Joe McIlvaine will inform Andersen that his $2 million option for 1993 will not be picked up. They instead will pay him his buyout of $350,000. But Andersen also has some news for the Padres: He wants to stay. He knows he'll have to take a whopping pay cut. In fact, Andersen knows he might even have to play for the minimum $109,000.
Advertisement
SPORTS
May 21, 1989
Larry Andersen, the Houston Astros' relief pitcher, throws a fastball and talks a screwball. He wonders about things most of us probably don't ever consider: --"What do they call a coffee break at the Lipton Tea Co.?" --"What do they package Styrofoam in when they ship it?" --"How do you explain counter-clockwise to someone with a digital watch?" --"When you see a fly on the ceiling, was it flying upside down all the time, or was it flying right-side up and flipped over at the last possible second?"
SPORTS
June 29, 1992 | SCOTT MILLER
Your average day at the ballpark? They played Jerry Lee Lewis' "Whole Lotta Shakin' Going On" over the public address system between the first and second innings at San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium. And the Padres had a stadium evacuation plan ready to go. The worst United States earthquake in 40 years shook things up at the stadium on Sunday before the Padres' 7-3 victory over San Francisco. "It shook me," Padre pitcher Bruce Hurst said.
SPORTS
August 6, 1991 | BOB NIGHTENGALE
Padre reliever Larry Andersen, who gave up the game-winning hit to Craig Biggio, blamed his emotions for his poor performance in the Padres' 2-1 defeat Monday to the Astros. "There was no question I was trying to do too much, coming back here for the first time," said Andersen, who spent his past five seasons with the Astros. "You'd think after 21 years in this game, you'd know better. This just proves that pitchers aren't the smartest people in the world. I had a giant brain cramp.
SPORTS
August 21, 1991 | BOB NIGHTENGALE
Padre reliever Larry Andersen, still aggravated about Dodger Manager Tom Lasorda's antics the previous night, went sightseeing Tuesday afternoon at Universal Studios. He stepped into a few gift shops, looked around, but never could find the item he really wanted. "I really wanted to buy pompons for Lasorda," Andersen said. "That's what I really wanted to do." Why didn't he? "They don't sell any."
SPORTS
June 29, 1992 | SCOTT MILLER
Your average day at the ballpark? They played Jerry Lee Lewis' "Whole Lotta Shakin' Going On" over the public address system between the first and second innings at San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium. And the Padres had a stadium evacuation plan ready to go. The worst United States earthquake in 40 years shook things up at the stadium on Sunday before the Padres' 7-3 victory over San Francisco. "It shook me," Padre pitcher Bruce Hurst said.
SPORTS
August 29, 1991 | BOB NIGHTENGALE
Padre reliever Larry Andersen, who feared surgery would be necessary to heal his ailing neck, instead learned Wednesday that no surgery will be required. He will be allowed to pitch again within a week. Andersen was diagnosed as having two-level cervical disk disease. He underwent two days of extensive testing when the diagnosis was made by Dr. Arthur White and Dr. Jeffery Saul of the Spine Care Center.
SPORTS
March 12, 1991 | DON PATTERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The subject is the duration of his burp. And Padre reliever Larry Andersen is serious. He isn't snickering or even smiling. His voice is matter of fact, as though he were discussing the art of pitching to a .300 hitter. So, how long is this burp? Fifteen seconds? "I could probably do it 15 seconds," Andersen says. "It wouldn't be loud at 15. I could mute it a little bit and go longer but if I just let out a big thunder spray or something it's short and quick. But it's loud.
SPORTS
March 8, 1992 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nolan Ryan may have pitched seven no-hitters in his career, but his fondest moment in baseball was listening to Larry Andersen belch the entire tune of the national anthem. Dennis Eckersley may be the finest reliever in baseball, but there was no better time in life than when he and Andersen were roommates--in the back of an El Camino.
SPORTS
May 16, 1992
It makes me mad to read about Larry Andersen. The fans boo him. What kind of fans do we have who keep on booing their own players? First it was John Kruk, then Benito Santiago and Andersen. The fans are a bunch of crybabies. They don't deserve a baseball team. They seem to forget the ballplayers are just people doing their best. Sure, I get mad when they don't play good. But I would never boo my own players. They feel bad enough without us booing them. Boo the Dodgers or the Reds, but give our players a break.
SPORTS
May 8, 1992 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He walks sheepishly into the clubhouse these days, rarely initiating conversation, much less cracking jokes. He dresses quietly, heads to the trainer's room and usually doesn't emerge until the Padres are about to take the field for stretching exercises. He remains quiet on the bench during games, and afterward he no longer is the life of the party. Padre reliever Larry Andersen, take away a few aches and pains, certainly looks the same to the casual observer.
SPORTS
March 13, 1992 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nolan Ryan has pitched seven no-hitters in his career, but his fondest memory in baseball is of hearing Larry Andersen belch the entire national anthem. Dennis Eckersley may be the finest relief pitcher in baseball, but there was no better time in his life than when he and Andersen were roommates--in the back of a pickup truck.
SPORTS
March 8, 1992 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nolan Ryan may have pitched seven no-hitters in his career, but his fondest moment in baseball was listening to Larry Andersen belch the entire tune of the national anthem. Dennis Eckersley may be the finest reliever in baseball, but there was no better time in life than when he and Andersen were roommates--in the back of an El Camino.
SPORTS
September 17, 1991 | ALAN DROOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even as the Padres got a glimpse of what might have been, they got a taste of reality Monday. While Greg Harris pitched another fine game, Thomas Howard drove in five runs and Larry Andersen earned his 10th save in a 6-1 victory over the Houston Astros, Tony Gwynn was facing the inevitable. He is scheduled for surgery Wednesday on his aching left knee.
SPORTS
August 29, 1991 | BOB NIGHTENGALE
Padre reliever Larry Andersen, who feared surgery would be necessary to heal his ailing neck, instead learned Wednesday that no surgery will be required. He will be allowed to pitch again within a week. Andersen was diagnosed as having two-level cervical disk disease. He underwent two days of extensive testing when the diagnosis was made by Dr. Arthur White and Dr. Jeffery Saul of the Spine Care Center.
SPORTS
September 1, 1990 | From Associated Press
Pennant contenders went on their annual shopping sprees Friday, making last-minute deals to beat the deadline for eligibility for postseason play, while non-contenders swapped veterans for prospects. The Houston Astros were a major dealer, sending reliever Larry Andersen to Boston for minor league third baseman Jeff Bagwell, 22, who is leading the double-A Eastern League in hitting.
SPORTS
May 8, 1992 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He walks sheepishly into the clubhouse these days, rarely initiating conversation, much less cracking jokes. He dresses quietly, heads to the trainer's room and usually doesn't emerge until the Padres are about to take the field for stretching exercises. He remains quiet on the bench during games, and afterward he no longer is the life of the party. Padre reliever Larry Andersen, take away a few aches and pains, certainly looks the same to the casual observer.
SPORTS
August 24, 1991 | BOB NIGHTENGALE
Padre reliever Larry Andersen, who was unable to pitch Friday for the first time in three months because of a stiff neck, said he now is considering the possibility of off-season surgery. "I don't want to ever go through another season like this again," said Andersen, who signed a two-year, $4.35-million contract last winter. "I'm going to talk to some specialists, get some other opinions, have another MRI, and see what happens. This has been miserable."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|