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Larry Blamire

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2004 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
"The Lost Skeleton of Cadavra" may not be for everyone, but those who appreciate spot-on spoofs of the cheesiest '50s sci-fi monster movies may find it an inspired delight. What's more, the film's writer-director-star, Larry Blamire, has a sharp ear for the cliches of old serials, radio shows and B-movies and their motifs that reaches back at least to "King Kong," from which it makes a direct steal.
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NEWS
June 24, 2004 | Susan King
Bad Santa Billy Bob Thornton, Tony Cox Dimension, $30 Though it's crude, rude and offensive, "Bad Santa" boasts a deliciously twisted performance from Billy Bob Thornton as a boozy, womanizing safecracker who works as Santa at a different department store every year so he can case the place with his little-person partner (Tony Cox). But even this "bad" Santa learns the meaning of Christmas from a chubby, lonely little boy (Brett Kelly). Bernie Mac and the late John Ritter also star.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2009 | Susan King
Though Hollywood cinema is best known for producing some of the greatest dark, dank and atmospheric examples of film noir, the French have never been far behind. The new Los Angeles County Museum of Art retrospective "French Crime Wave," which begins Friday and continues weekends through June 20, will highlight just that fact.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2004 | Susan King
For his first feature, "The Lost Skeleton of Cadavra," writer-director-actor Larry Blamire didn't draw inspiration from the likes of Howard Hawks or John Ford or even Steven Spielberg. His role model was Ed Wood, the endearingly inept cross-dressing director of such dreadfully wonderful films as "Plan 9 from Outer Space" and "Bride of the Monster."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2008 | Susan King, King is a Times staff writer.
It's a bit of a monster bash this weekend as the American Cinematheque presents the Attack of the Giant Screen festival at the Aero Theatre. The fun starts this evening with 1954's Los Angeles-centric "Them!" and 1957's "The Giant Claw." On tap for Friday is Don Siegel's seminal 1956 thriller, "Invasion of the Body Snatchers," and "Earth vs. the Flying Saucers," also from 1956, which features the cutting-edge special effects of Ray Harryhausen.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1990 | JANICE ARKATOV, Arkatov writes regularly about theater for Calendar.
There's a fine winter season on the horizon, offering comedy, drama, dance, mystery, nostalgia, satire--something for everyone. What follows is a theater-by-theater guide to what's on now, and what's coming up. At Sherman Oaks' Actors Alley, two pre-holiday entries are back on the boards: George Abbott's "Broadway" (1929), a comic saga done entirely in black and white about Prohibition, gangsters and chorus girls, playing through Feb. 24.
NEWS
September 20, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
YOU'D have to clone yourself to catch all the movies screening tonight: two classics, a cult comedy in the making and a glimpse at the underbelly of life in Lisbon from one of Portugal's leading filmmakers. Richard Gladstein, producer of the Oscar-nominated best films "The Cider House Rules" and "Finding Neverland," presents David Lean's multi-Academy Award-winning 1957 epic "The Bridge on the River Kwai" as part of the Skirball's Cinema Legacy series.
NEWS
January 24, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American Cinematheque's Alternative Screen showcase presents tonight at 7:30 Larry Blamire's "The Lost Skeleton of Cadavra," one of the funniest and most accurate spoofs of Z-grade sci-fi horror pictures of the '50s and early '60s. Blamire, who also stars as scientist Dr. Paul Armstrong, has the cornball dialogue down so perfectly that it's hard to resist quoting swaths of it. He and his admirably professional cast manage to keep straight faces, even in the most deliriously silly moments.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2009 | BETSY SHARKEY, FILM CRITIC
Swedish filmmaker Jan Troell is a remarkable visualist. His latest, "Everlasting Moments," came out this spring, and like most foreign films, was briefly in a handful of local theaters. This film was meant for the big screen with its audience immersed in darkness, where the images, so beautifully framed, come to life in the darkness. Here's how I saw it: at home watching on a 35-inch Sony at 8:30 on a foggy Saturday morning that soon turned sun-soaked, reflecting off the screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1990 | ROBERT KOEHLER
What is it now? Burn a flag, go to jail? To some, that sounds reasonable. To others, that sounds like latent totalitarianism. It's also a little bit funny, as most things are when you think about them long enough. Mime artist William Fisher has thought about flag burning, and the result is an amusing piece, "Ready? Begin!," the better half of the Zeta Collective's "Half Life Bis" at the Zeta Theatre.
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