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Larry Clark

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2001 | HUGH HART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I saw confusion, and I saw a front that said, in his eyes, 'don't mess with me, I've been tampered with enough.' I can't call the kid innocent ... but I can tell you the boy got a bit more than he bargained for." That's Brad Renfro describing his reaction to a mug shot of Marty Puccio, whom he portrays in "Bully," a new film directed by Larry Clark that opens Friday in Los Angeles. In 1993, Puccio, then 16, stabbed and killed his best friend, Bobby Kent. Puccio is serving a life sentence.
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SPORTS
January 26, 2013 | By Ben Bolch
Brenda and Larry Clark didn't see as much of their son Earl as they might have liked while visiting the Lakers forward over New Year's. After polishing off some of his favorite dishes, including his mom's stuffing and potato salad, Earl would return to his team's practice facility late in the evening for a few hours of extra shooting. "Sometimes, man, you'd get there and the security guard would be sleeping," Earl said, "and sometimes they don't open the gate. " It was nothing new for Clark.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2006 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
What's up with Larry Clark and kids in peril? In his latest lurk into the world of teenagers on the loose, Clark uses first-time actors to enact a fictional version of their own experiences.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2006 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
What's up with Larry Clark and kids in peril? In his latest lurk into the world of teenagers on the loose, Clark uses first-time actors to enact a fictional version of their own experiences.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In "Bully," photographer-turned-filmmaker Larry Clark brings alive so compellingly the aimless, brutal existence of a group of Florida teenagers that it becomes too easy to accept the film's gratuitous and distracting nudity and fairly graphic sex as part of a telling-it-like-it-is honesty. Upon reflection, however, it becomes disturbingly clear that Clark is himself exploiting his young people, ogling their unblemished bodies.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1990 | KRISTINE McKENNA
In 1971 a 28-year-old photographer named Larry Clark published a book of photographs called "Tulsa." Comprised of 50 black-and-white photographs shot from 1963 through 1971, the book sold for just $5 a copy and was published in a small edition of 2,700 at a cost of $8,000. A lone wolf from Oklahoma, Clark had only the most tenuous ties to the world of fine art photography at the time--he had never exhibited his work, and this, his first book, was released with no fanfare or promotional push.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1995 | JAMES HOSNEY and JESSE ENGDAHL, James Hosney is chair and Jesse Engdahl is an instructor at the Crossroads School Film and Video Program in Santa Monica
Kenneth Turan's slamming of Larry Clark's "Kids" appeared below Turan's somewhat generous review of "Waterworld," leaving people to assume they would be better served seeing a mindless film than a challenging one, as long as they take the Hollywood action-epic on its own terms, which is exactly what Turan refuses to do with "Kids" ("Grossing Out the Old Squares," Calendar, July 28). Larry Clark's film attempts to take an honest look at kids.
SPORTS
January 26, 2013 | By Ben Bolch
Brenda and Larry Clark didn't see as much of their son Earl as they might have liked while visiting the Lakers forward over New Year's. After polishing off some of his favorite dishes, including his mom's stuffing and potato salad, Earl would return to his team's practice facility late in the evening for a few hours of extra shooting. "Sometimes, man, you'd get there and the security guard would be sleeping," Earl said, "and sometimes they don't open the gate. " It was nothing new for Clark.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1998 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The story behind the story on some movies is often as compelling and dramatic as what's on screen. That mirror reflection between life and art certainly applies to Larry Clark's "Another Day in Paradise," a candid, cautionary tale about drug abuse and petty thievery. The making of the movie, which opens Wednesday, was as edgy and fraught with potential disaster as the story it tells, according to those involved with the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1995 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To sidestep potential conflict with Miramax Films' family-oriented parent corporation, the Walt Disney Co., Miramax co-chairmen Harvey and Bob Weinstein have set up an independent releasing company to market and distribute the controversial "Kids"--Larry Clark's graphic portrayal of a day in the life of some amoral, sex-obsessed New York City teens. Because the new company, Excalibur Films, is not a signatory of the Motion Picture Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In "Bully," photographer-turned-filmmaker Larry Clark brings alive so compellingly the aimless, brutal existence of a group of Florida teenagers that it becomes too easy to accept the film's gratuitous and distracting nudity and fairly graphic sex as part of a telling-it-like-it-is honesty. Upon reflection, however, it becomes disturbingly clear that Clark is himself exploiting his young people, ogling their unblemished bodies.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2001 | HUGH HART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I saw confusion, and I saw a front that said, in his eyes, 'don't mess with me, I've been tampered with enough.' I can't call the kid innocent ... but I can tell you the boy got a bit more than he bargained for." That's Brad Renfro describing his reaction to a mug shot of Marty Puccio, whom he portrays in "Bully," a new film directed by Larry Clark that opens Friday in Los Angeles. In 1993, Puccio, then 16, stabbed and killed his best friend, Bobby Kent. Puccio is serving a life sentence.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1998 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The story behind the story on some movies is often as compelling and dramatic as what's on screen. That mirror reflection between life and art certainly applies to Larry Clark's "Another Day in Paradise," a candid, cautionary tale about drug abuse and petty thievery. The making of the movie, which opens Wednesday, was as edgy and fraught with potential disaster as the story it tells, according to those involved with the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1995 | JAMES HOSNEY and JESSE ENGDAHL, James Hosney is chair and Jesse Engdahl is an instructor at the Crossroads School Film and Video Program in Santa Monica
Kenneth Turan's slamming of Larry Clark's "Kids" appeared below Turan's somewhat generous review of "Waterworld," leaving people to assume they would be better served seeing a mindless film than a challenging one, as long as they take the Hollywood action-epic on its own terms, which is exactly what Turan refuses to do with "Kids" ("Grossing Out the Old Squares," Calendar, July 28). Larry Clark's film attempts to take an honest look at kids.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1990 | KRISTINE McKENNA
In 1971 a 28-year-old photographer named Larry Clark published a book of photographs called "Tulsa." Comprised of 50 black-and-white photographs shot from 1963 through 1971, the book sold for just $5 a copy and was published in a small edition of 2,700 at a cost of $8,000. A lone wolf from Oklahoma, Clark had only the most tenuous ties to the world of fine art photography at the time--he had never exhibited his work, and this, his first book, was released with no fanfare or promotional push.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2008
THE piece about Brad Renfro ["Death Spiral," Feb. 10] was heartbreaking. The saddest, most telling words were those of director Larry Clark, whose reaction to Renfro's visible needle tracks was: "I saw the whole movie going down the drain." How awful to look at a troubled young soul and see only a commodity. Joanne Wolf Venice
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1999
A woman who was shot to death by a robber had only $3 in her purse, authorities said. Lorena Gonzalez, 38, was shot Saturday night outside a 99 Cents Only store and was pronounced dead on arrival at a hospital. Gonzalez and her 2-year-old son were waiting in the family's van while her husband and two older children were shopping. A man approached, grabbed her purse and started to run. When Gonzalez got out of the van and screamed, the robber turned and shot her in the chest, Police Lt.
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