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Larry D Thompson

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NEWS
February 12, 2001 | From the Washington Post
President Bush intends to appoint Larry D. Thompson, an Atlanta lawyer who is African American, to the high-profile post of deputy attorney general, a move designed in part to counter criticism that Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft is insensitive to race, administration sources said Sunday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
August 15, 2002 | From Bloomberg
Deputy Atty. Gen. Larry D. Thompson, head of a Bush administration task force on corporate crime, was accused in a lawsuit filed Wednesday of taking part in an alleged securities fraud while a director at Providian Financial Corp.
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NATIONAL
August 15, 2002 | From Bloomberg
Deputy Atty. Gen. Larry D. Thompson, head of a Bush administration task force on corporate crime, was accused in a lawsuit filed Wednesday of taking part in an alleged securities fraud while a director at Providian Financial Corp.
NEWS
February 12, 2001 | From the Washington Post
President Bush intends to appoint Larry D. Thompson, an Atlanta lawyer who is African American, to the high-profile post of deputy attorney general, a move designed in part to counter criticism that Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft is insensitive to race, administration sources said Sunday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1996 | MIMI KO CRUZ
City officials are considering naming the new baseball field at Esteli Park after Richard T. Gross, an attorney who coached several local youth sports teams until he died in 1991. According to a city report, Gross served on two school boards, coached Little League baseball, softball and basketball teams and was involved in a number of local schools and civic and youth organizations. Larry D. Thompson Jr.
NEWS
April 1, 1997 | From Associated Press
The Whitewater investigation racked up $5 million in expenses in the six-month period that ended last September, according to an audit of special prosecutors' probes that found one from Reagan-era wrongdoing was still going strong. The independent counsel investigation into influence peddling at the Department of Housing and Urban Development in the late 1980s spent $661,885 between April and September of last year, said a General Accounting Office report released Monday.
OPINION
November 10, 2004
With the resignations Tuesday of Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft and Commerce Secretary Don Evans, President Bush can begin to make good on his pledge to reach out to the half of the country that didn't vote for him. Relieved of the burden of running for reelection, Bush is now free to pick a more centrist attorney general who will depoliticize law enforcement. Moreover, if Bush's talk of bipartisanship is more than empty rhetoric, his needed overhaul of his Cabinet should not stop there.
NEWS
March 6, 1997 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Independent counsels are the Energizer bunnies of Washington. Almost nothing stops them. Soon, in response to congressional pressure, another independent counsel may be created to examine questions about the White House's role in political fund-raising during the 1996 campaign. If that happens, count on the probe to have an extended shelf life. And don't hold your breath waiting for dramatic indictments. Whitewater independent counsel Kenneth W.
NEWS
January 3, 1996 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sharp scaling down of the original charges, former Interior Secretary James G. Watt pleaded guilty Tuesday to a misdemeanor count of attempting to mislead a grand jury that was investigating influence peddling at the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Watt, 57, faces a maximum punishment of up to six months in jail and a $5,000 fine, which he agreed to pay in plea bargaining discussions with the government.
NATIONAL
November 4, 2004 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
President Bush has begun preparing a second-term Cabinet that will likely lose a few well-known faces but will retain many key players and continue to be dominated by its most conservative members, say administration aides and GOP insiders. The expected departure of Secretary of State Colin L. Powell, a relative moderate, will calm the internal debates that have raged between conservatives and moderates since the beginning of Bush's first term.
NEWS
April 6, 2001 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The lawyer tapped by President Bush for a prestigious Justice Department post came under fire Thursday for his sharp conservative rhetoric, but he vowed that his politics would not color his reading of the law on abortion, affirmative action and other sensitive issues. Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee, however, were openly skeptical as they considered the nomination of Theodore B. Olson, a superstar Republican lawyer from Los Angeles whom Bush nominated in February to be U.S.
NEWS
June 23, 2001 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a setback for Sen. Robert Torricelli's efforts to fend off an ongoing federal probe of his financial dealings, the Justice Department on Friday rejected the lawmaker's request to turn the investigation over to a special counsel. Torricelli, a New Jersey Democrat accused of taking tens of thousands of dollars in illegal gifts from a campaign contributor, had sought the appointment of a special counsel.
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