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Larry Donald

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August 4, 1990 | CHRISTINE BRENNAN, WASHINGTON POST
Larry Donald, the best amateur super heavyweight boxer in the United States, had a longer career as a shoe salesman than he has had as a boxer. Donald sold shoes in Cincinnati for four years. He has boxed for three. So, to say the United States is a little weak in this most glamorous of weight classes is to understate the case. Donald, however, understates nothing.
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SPORTS
December 4, 1994 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fight started in a lounge on Monday, moved to a ring on Saturday, spilled over into a press tent afterward and figures to end up in Superior Court sometime next week. The fight in the ring? Oh yeah, that . Once the two sides decided on a ring size, an issue that caused screaming-match acrimony, Riddick Bowe at last stalked his elusive opponent down and won a unanimous 12-round decision over Larry Donald before a crowd of 3,574 at the Caesars Palace Sports Pavilion.
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SPORTS
December 4, 1994 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fight started in a lounge on Monday, moved to a ring on Saturday, spilled over into a press tent afterward and figures to end up in Superior Court sometime next week. The fight in the ring? Oh yeah, that . Once the two sides decided on a ring size, an issue that caused screaming-match acrimony, Riddick Bowe at last stalked his elusive opponent down and won a unanimous 12-round decision over Larry Donald before a crowd of 3,574 at the Caesars Palace Sports Pavilion.
SPORTS
December 3, 1994 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five days after Round 1, Riddick Bowe and Larry Donald have crossed a state line to resume a nontitle fight that started Monday and transformed the Forum Club into a maelstrom of cocktail napkins and finger food. Tonight at 6:45, on HBO, Donald gets his chance to answer Bowe's news conference sucker punches when the two meet in a 12-round heavyweight bout at Caesars Palace Sports Pavilion. This time there will a referee, three judges and--perhaps--some semblance of decorum.
SPORTS
December 3, 1994 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five days after Round 1, Riddick Bowe and Larry Donald have crossed a state line to resume a nontitle fight that started Monday and transformed the Forum Club into a maelstrom of cocktail napkins and finger food. Tonight at 6:45, on HBO, Donald gets his chance to answer Bowe's news conference sucker punches when the two meet in a 12-round heavyweight bout at Caesars Palace Sports Pavilion. This time there will a referee, three judges and--perhaps--some semblance of decorum.
SPORTS
July 27, 1992 | MIKE DOWNEY, The Times
And now, another poem written by American super-heavyweight boxer Larry Donald, determined as ever to dethrone heavyweight boxing champion Evander Holyfield some day. A lot of people might think it's unfair / I will become the first fighter who's a billionaire. Some people might think it's a dream / But those same people will scream . Stop the fight! Stop the fight! Before he kills the former champ tonight!
SPORTS
September 20, 1989 | From Associated Press
Sharp-punching Tonga McClain advanced at the World Amateur Boxing Championships today, but two other Americans lost. Six members of the young 12-boxer U.S. team have seen action, and three have lost. McClain, 19, of Racine, Wis., bombarded Oshio Osawa of Japan with head blows and scored a 38-14 victory under the new computerized scoring system in a 132-pound bout. McClain tired in the third round but had the bout in hand by then. The U.S. losers were Paul Vaden, 21, of Puyallup, Wash.
SPORTS
July 22, 1992 | MIKE DOWNEY
A poet needs mood. A poet needs atmosphere. Even in darkness, a poet can have insight. Even in blindness, a John Milton can compose "Paradise Lost." And even with the blinds drawn, even wearing a patch over his left eye, a Larry Donald can take pen in hand and share his unique vision with the world. So, ladies and gentlemen. . . . From a dimly lit room overlooking the Mediterranean Sea . . . in this corner of the Olympic athletes' village here in BAR-ce-LO-na . . . weighing in at 205 pounds . .
SPORTS
November 29, 1994 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what was the best combination he has thrown in more than a year, former heavyweight champion Riddick Bowe rocked a Monday news conference at the Forum when he landed two solid punches to the face of Larry Donald, his opponent in Saturday night's non-title fight at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. The altercation broke out as the fighters were fielding questions from reporters.
SPORTS
December 2, 1994 | CHRIS DUFRESNE
In an amazing public display of foolishness, former heavyweight champion Riddick Bowe socked Larry Donald in the jaw Monday at a Forum news conference hyping their nontitle heavyweight fight Saturday at Caesars Palace. So, will Bowe get away with it? "Yes," said Marc Ratner, executive director of the Nevada State Athletic Commission.
SPORTS
December 2, 1994 | CHRIS DUFRESNE
In an amazing public display of foolishness, former heavyweight champion Riddick Bowe socked Larry Donald in the jaw Monday at a Forum news conference hyping their nontitle heavyweight fight Saturday at Caesars Palace. So, will Bowe get away with it? "Yes," said Marc Ratner, executive director of the Nevada State Athletic Commission.
SPORTS
November 29, 1994 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what was the best combination he has thrown in more than a year, former heavyweight champion Riddick Bowe rocked a Monday news conference at the Forum when he landed two solid punches to the face of Larry Donald, his opponent in Saturday night's non-title fight at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. The altercation broke out as the fighters were fielding questions from reporters.
SPORTS
July 27, 1992 | MIKE DOWNEY, The Times
And now, another poem written by American super-heavyweight boxer Larry Donald, determined as ever to dethrone heavyweight boxing champion Evander Holyfield some day. A lot of people might think it's unfair / I will become the first fighter who's a billionaire. Some people might think it's a dream / But those same people will scream . Stop the fight! Stop the fight! Before he kills the former champ tonight!
SPORTS
July 22, 1992 | MIKE DOWNEY
A poet needs mood. A poet needs atmosphere. Even in darkness, a poet can have insight. Even in blindness, a John Milton can compose "Paradise Lost." And even with the blinds drawn, even wearing a patch over his left eye, a Larry Donald can take pen in hand and share his unique vision with the world. So, ladies and gentlemen. . . . From a dimly lit room overlooking the Mediterranean Sea . . . in this corner of the Olympic athletes' village here in BAR-ce-LO-na . . . weighing in at 205 pounds . .
SPORTS
August 4, 1990 | CHRISTINE BRENNAN, WASHINGTON POST
Larry Donald, the best amateur super heavyweight boxer in the United States, had a longer career as a shoe salesman than he has had as a boxer. Donald sold shoes in Cincinnati for four years. He has boxed for three. So, to say the United States is a little weak in this most glamorous of weight classes is to understate the case. Donald, however, understates nothing.
SPORTS
September 20, 1989 | From Associated Press
Sharp-punching Tonga McClain advanced at the World Amateur Boxing Championships today, but two other Americans lost. Six members of the young 12-boxer U.S. team have seen action, and three have lost. McClain, 19, of Racine, Wis., bombarded Oshio Osawa of Japan with head blows and scored a 38-14 victory under the new computerized scoring system in a 132-pound bout. McClain tired in the third round but had the bout in hand by then. The U.S. losers were Paul Vaden, 21, of Puyallup, Wash.
SPORTS
May 26, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United States won three of the last four bouts, including a controversial final, to salvage a 6-6 tie and end a 15-match dual losing streak to Cuba. Super heavyweight Larry Donald of Cincinnati benefited from two penalty points for holding assessed against Cuba's Freddy Rojas by U.S. referee George Benedetto to win a 2-1 decision in the final bout to create the tie.
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