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Larry Goldings

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1999 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Larry Goldings was well on his way to becoming an important jazz keyboardist in 1991, having studied with distinguished pianists Keith Jarrett, Sir Roland Hanna and Jaki Byard. He also had a visible post in guitarist Jim Hall's ambitious ensemble, and led his own trio during weekly sessions at Augie's, a tiny, now defunct club near New York City's Columbia University. Then he got a visit from Maceo Parker, James Brown's longtime saxophonist.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2004 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Organist Larry Goldings, guitarist Peter Bernstein and drummer Bill Stewart have been working together, on and off, for nearly a decade. So it was no surprise that the trio's opening set at the Jazz Bakery Wednesday was a study in musical empathy. Goldings' organ playing revealed his roots, a rich melange of sources embracing the blues intensity of Jimmy Smith and the innovative harmonic textures of Larry Young.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1991 | DON HECKMAN
* * * Larry Goldings, "The Intimacy of the Blues," Verve. Twenty-three-year-old organist Goldings has listened carefully to predecessors Jimmy Smith, Jimmy McGriff and Shirley Scott. His debut album is a splendid collection of straight-down-the-middle, hard-grooving jazz highlighted by such unexpected items as "Skylark" and "Wouldn't It Be Loverly." Goldings is particularly abetted by Bill Stewart's superbly articulate drumming and Peter Bernstein's blues-drenched guitar.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1999 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Larry Goldings was well on his way to becoming an important jazz keyboardist in 1991, having studied with distinguished pianists Keith Jarrett, Sir Roland Hanna and Jaki Byard. He also had a visible post in guitarist Jim Hall's ambitious ensemble, and led his own trio during weekly sessions at Augie's, a tiny, now defunct club near New York City's Columbia University. Then he got a visit from Maceo Parker, James Brown's longtime saxophonist.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1995 | Bill Kohlhaase
LARRY GOLDINGS "Whatever It Takes" Warner Bros. * * The title of organist Goldings' CD seems to indicate that he's willing to do . . . , well, you get the idea. Here, that willingness suggests the participation of big-name guest talents, notably Maceo Parker, Fred Wesley, David Sanborn and Joshua Redman, to help the album. But their inclusion does just the opposite.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2004 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Organist Larry Goldings, guitarist Peter Bernstein and drummer Bill Stewart have been working together, on and off, for nearly a decade. So it was no surprise that the trio's opening set at the Jazz Bakery Wednesday was a study in musical empathy. Goldings' organ playing revealed his roots, a rich melange of sources embracing the blues intensity of Jimmy Smith and the innovative harmonic textures of Larry Young.
NEWS
January 13, 2005
Hammond B3 organist Larry Goldings has been praised for the way he blends the influences of his idols (Jimmy Smith and Larry Young, among others) with his own imaginative approach to the instrument, juxtaposing foot-tapping blues segments with ear-grabbing chordal dissonances. At Jazz Bakery this weekend, the 36-year-old virtuoso will perform with his longtime collaborators: guitarist Peter Bernstein and drummer Bill Stewart. * Jazz Bakery 3233 Helms Ave., Culver City 8 and 9:30 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The trio of organ, guitar and drums is one of the classic jazz instrumentations. With the organ providing an orchestral array of sounds, the guitar adding its own capacity to produce melody, harmony and rhythm, and the drums holding everything together with a surge of swing, it is an ensemble with remarkably expansive musical potential.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1996 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's jazz twofer week at the Catalina Bar & Grill. In an attractive booking, the Hollywood jazz club is featuring organist Larry Goldings and pianist Brad Mehldau, both leading trios. Both groups are young and talented with enough ability, but not quite enough name recognition, to headline on their own. Name recognition or not, the engagement affords an excellent opportunity to hear some extremely gifted young performers at an early stage in their careers.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1995 | Don Heckman
KENNY GARRETT, JOSHUA REDMAN, WALLACE RONEY, LARRY GOLDINGS, others "Warner Jams, Vol. 1" Warner Bros. * * * Jam sessions are among the most cherished traditions of jazz. As a learning situation, in which young players have the opportunity to measure themselves against experienced performers, they can prove invaluable. And, as summit meetings between prominent players, jam sessions have provided a long history of exciting, spontaneous improvisational encounters.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1995 | Bill Kohlhaase
LARRY GOLDINGS "Whatever It Takes" Warner Bros. * * The title of organist Goldings' CD seems to indicate that he's willing to do . . . , well, you get the idea. Here, that willingness suggests the participation of big-name guest talents, notably Maceo Parker, Fred Wesley, David Sanborn and Joshua Redman, to help the album. But their inclusion does just the opposite.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1991 | DON HECKMAN
* * * Larry Goldings, "The Intimacy of the Blues," Verve. Twenty-three-year-old organist Goldings has listened carefully to predecessors Jimmy Smith, Jimmy McGriff and Shirley Scott. His debut album is a splendid collection of straight-down-the-middle, hard-grooving jazz highlighted by such unexpected items as "Skylark" and "Wouldn't It Be Loverly." Goldings is particularly abetted by Bill Stewart's superbly articulate drumming and Peter Bernstein's blues-drenched guitar.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1994 | Zan Stewart
JOHN SCOFIELD "Hand Jive" Blue Note * * * In Scofield's first band recording since saxman Joe Lovano left his employ last year, the guitarist presents his new quartet and re-explores the brainy, appealing blues-R&B turf he called home on several albums in the late '70s and early '80s.
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