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Larry Hansel

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June 2, 1994 | Rose-Marie Turk
When he was 20, Larry Hansel had a thriving car detail business and a modest dream: He wanted to represent a clothing line and drive cross-country in a van "like a cowboy on the road." Thirteen years later, Hansel is president of Rampage Clothing Co., the multidivisional, multimillion-dollar firm whose provocative ads cover hundreds of L.A. buses and bus benches.
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NEWS
June 2, 1994 | Rose-Marie Turk
When he was 20, Larry Hansel had a thriving car detail business and a modest dream: He wanted to represent a clothing line and drive cross-country in a van "like a cowboy on the road." Thirteen years later, Hansel is president of Rampage Clothing Co., the multidivisional, multimillion-dollar firm whose provocative ads cover hundreds of L.A. buses and bus benches.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1992 | THOM MROZEK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Larry T. Hansel, the disgruntled worker who stalked and killed two executives after being laid off from the Elgar Corp. last year, was sentenced Monday to spend the rest of his life in prison. Superior Court Judge Frederic Link ordered the 42-year-old electronics worker to serve a term of life in state prison without the possibility of parole.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1992 | THOM MROZEK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Larry T. Hansel, the disgruntled worker who stalked and killed two executives after being laid off from the Elgar Corp. last year, was sentenced Monday to spend the rest of his life in prison. Superior Court Judge Frederic Link ordered the 42-year-old electronics worker to serve a term of life in state prison without the possibility of parole.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1992 | THOM MROZEK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Claiming he was insane at the time of the attack, laid-off electronics technician Larry T. Hansel pleaded guilty Wednesday to charges of murdering two executives during a shooting rampage last year at Elgar Corp. Hansel, 42, admitted his guilt to San Diego Superior Court Judge Herbert J. Exarhos, who warned that Hansel may be sentenced to serve the rest of his life in prison.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1992
Attorneys in the case of Larry Hansel, the laid-off technician accused of killing two Elgar Corp. executives last June, have failed reach a plea bargain, but Hansel's attorney said in court Friday that he hopes to resolve the case without a trial. Hansel, 41, is charged with two counts of murder in a special circumstance case stemming from the shooting death of two men at the Miramar electronics firm. Hansel has pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity.
NEWS
August 21, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A laid-off technician pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity to charges of murdering two company executives during a shooting and bombing rampage at an electronics firm. Municipal Judge E. Mac Amos ordered Larry T. Hansel, 41, to stand trial in Superior Court for the June 4 shooting deaths of Elgar Corp. executives John Jones and Michael Krowitz. Hansel told Amos he understood the consequences of the plea.
NEWS
May 14, 1992
A computer technician who stormed his former office and fatally shot two executives pleaded guilty to murder Wednesday but contends he was insane during his rampage. A trial was scheduled for June 15 to determine whether Larry Thomas Hansel, 41, was sane when he terrorized the Elgar Corp. office in June, 1991, armed with a shotgun, a pistol and homemade bombs. He has pleaded insanity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1992
An essay recovered from Larry Hansel's toolbox three months before he went on a shooting spree at the Elgar Corp. details Hansel's preoccupation with communism, one world government and other conspiracy theories. The document, titled "From the Heart," was read to the jury in Hansel's sanity trial Wednesday. The jury is hearing evidence that will help it determine if Hansel was insane when he methodically stalked and used a shotgun to murder two Elgar executives on June 4, 1991.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1992
The jury in the sanity trial of Larry Hansel began deliberations Tuesday to determine if the former Elgar Corp. worker should be held responsible for the murders of two high-level officials at the Mira Mesa firm. Hansel, a 42-year-old electronics technician, pleaded guilty last month to two counts of murder and special circumstance allegations stemming from the June 4, 1991, attack.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1992 | THOM MROZEK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Claiming he was insane at the time of the attack, laid-off electronics technician Larry T. Hansel pleaded guilty Wednesday to charges of murdering two executives during a shooting rampage last year at Elgar Corp. Hansel, 42, admitted his guilt to San Diego Superior Court Judge Herbert J. Exarhos, who warned that Hansel may be sentenced to serve the rest of his life in prison.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1992
Attorneys in the case of Larry Hansel, the laid-off technician accused of killing two Elgar Corp. executives last June, have failed reach a plea bargain, but Hansel's attorney said in court Friday that he hopes to resolve the case without a trial. Hansel, 41, is charged with two counts of murder in a special circumstance case stemming from the shooting death of two men at the Miramar electronics firm. Hansel has pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity.
BUSINESS
April 14, 1998
A Glendale-based air-conditioning contractor acquired a 65,240-square-foot manufacturing facility in Commerce for $3.45 million. Air Conditioning Co. bought the building at 3421 S. Malt Ave. from investment group Russell Enterprises. Seeley Co. represented both parties. * A Los Angeles investment group has purchased Rampage Clothing Co.'s 207,000-square-foot manufacturing and distribution facility in Vernon for $7 million. On Santa Fe bought the building at 2825 S. Santa Fe Ave.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1992 | CAROLE SUGARMAN, THE WASHINGTON POST
The attorney for the man who has admitted killing two executives at the Elgar Corp. a year ago said Tuesday his client drove to the electronics firm prepared for war because he believed that his former bosses were conspirators involved with the Antichrist and an impending nuclear war. Alex Loebig Jr. told a nine-woman, three-man San Diego Superior Court jury in Larry T.
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