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Larry Heinemann

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December 7, 1986 | RICHARD EDER
The most profound social distinction is the one between the living and the dead. Ghosts have fallen into the lower classes. They are as invisible as Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man, as the Hispanic busboy in a high-priced restaurant, or as the Suffolk laborers in "Akenfield" who patterned their work schedules so that estate owners would not be troubled by the sight of them.
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May 29, 2005 | Gerald Nicosia, Gerald Nicosia is the author of "Home to War: A History of the Vietnam Veterans' Movement."
For years, novelist Larry Heinemann has been legendary in the Vietnam veterans' community -- known as a wild man with a profound conscience, a joker, an angry man's angry man, a raconteur par excellence and, some would say, the best writer of the Vietnam generation. "Black Virgin Mountain," his memoir of the war and its effect on his life, will do nothing to dispel any of those myths. But it does something else.
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May 7, 1992 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
Hardee-har-har is, to begin with, hard. Madcap is the most painstakingly arranged of headgear. Rollicking requires advance planning. Comedy, in short, is not simply what a serious writer does to relax. Larry Heinemann, who wrote "Paco's Story," a painful and profoundly imagined novel about a Vietnam war veteran, takes the day off in "Cooler by the Lake." It is the broadest of whimsies about a picaresque working-class family in Chicago.
NEWS
May 7, 1992 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
Hardee-har-har is, to begin with, hard. Madcap is the most painstakingly arranged of headgear. Rollicking requires advance planning. Comedy, in short, is not simply what a serious writer does to relax. Larry Heinemann, who wrote "Paco's Story," a painful and profoundly imagined novel about a Vietnam war veteran, takes the day off in "Cooler by the Lake." It is the broadest of whimsies about a picaresque working-class family in Chicago.
BOOKS
May 29, 2005 | Gerald Nicosia, Gerald Nicosia is the author of "Home to War: A History of the Vietnam Veterans' Movement."
For years, novelist Larry Heinemann has been legendary in the Vietnam veterans' community -- known as a wild man with a profound conscience, a joker, an angry man's angry man, a raconteur par excellence and, some would say, the best writer of the Vietnam generation. "Black Virgin Mountain," his memoir of the war and its effect on his life, will do nothing to dispel any of those myths. But it does something else.
BOOKS
November 22, 1987 | JACK MILES, Times Book Editor
Larry Heinemann, the author of "Paco's Story" (Farrar, Straus & Giroux), a widely and warmly reviewed novel about the homecoming of a Vietnamese War veteran, has lately won a kind of victory over the New York Times, but only, it is painful to say, because the New York Times seems to have been spoiling for a fight with him. The New York Times did not review "Paco's Story" when it was published late in 1986. That newspaper's first attention to the novel came on Nov.
BOOKS
November 12, 1989
KOKO by Peter Straub (Signet: $5.95). Four vets return to Vietnam on a mission to track down one of their own--KoKo--a fifth friend who has gone berserk. PACO'S STORY by Larry Heinemann (Penguin: $7.95). Ghosts from Paco Sullivan's Vietnam past haunt him in a Podunk Texas town. (Winner of the National Book Award.) HIGH CRIMES by John Westerman (Pocket: $4.50). Crack and its menacing byproducts encircle a suburban Seaport, shaking it and two resident detectives, from their somnolent state.
BOOKS
November 15, 1987 | ELIZABETH MEHREN
Alice McDermott was in a pleasant daze. Standing amid the crowd of authors and publishers under the splendid vaulted ceilings of the Pierpont Morgan Library here, the La Jolla, Calif., novelist ("That Night") said she was "completely" surprised to have been chosen one of 10 winners of this year's Whiting Writers Award.
NEWS
May 5, 1988 | WENDY LEOPOLD, Leopold is a staff member at The Times Chicago bureau
A funny thing happened to writer Larry Heinemann at the 1987 National Book Awards ceremony. His book, "Paco's Story," won. It was as much a surprise to the 44-year-old Chicago writer as it was to New York's publishing Establishment. But Heinemann adjusted to it a good deal more quickly. When the announcement for the fiction award winner was made, the president of his publishing house, Farrar Straus & Giroux, "grabbed me by the arm and said, 'Get up, get up, it's you.'
BOOKS
December 7, 1986 | RICHARD EDER
The most profound social distinction is the one between the living and the dead. Ghosts have fallen into the lower classes. They are as invisible as Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man, as the Hispanic busboy in a high-priced restaurant, or as the Suffolk laborers in "Akenfield" who patterned their work schedules so that estate owners would not be troubled by the sight of them.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
Two desert-bound one-acts make up the newest offering from Theatre of N.O.T.E.: Grubb Graebner's "Arroyo Repo" and Cheryl Slean's "Palmdale," opening Wednesday at Friends and Artists Theatre in Hollywood. " 'Palmdale' is about a young woman accepting her own power, leaving her mother and the memory of her father behind," said Theatre of N.O.T.E. (New One-act Theatre Ensemble) artistic director Joseph Megel of the five-character piece.
BOOKS
March 7, 1993 | Robert Roper, Roper is the author, most recently, of the novel "Trespassers" (Ticknor & Fields).
Wayne Karlin's new novel takes us back to Vietnam-Land--not to Vietnam itself, but to that psychic geography defined for us by a school of writers who have been reading and influencing each other for a number of years now. It is sufficient for these writers, and for us, their often eager readers, simply to invoke the name Vietnam in order to conjure a mood, a sense of awfulness, weirdness, sick excitement and regret.
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