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Larry J Kimbell

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NEWS
September 24, 1987
Economists at UCLA's John E. Anderson Graduate School of Management have predicted stronger economic growth in the third quarter of 1987 than in recent years, according to the UCLA Business Forecast Conference. But because of a substantial increase in long-term interest rates and a weaker U. S. dollar, they said, the strong growth is not expected to last more than a few quarters. Larry J.
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BUSINESS
April 3, 1989 | JONATHAN PETERSON
Is slower growth on the horizon? A new UCLA economic forecast highlights five forces that could lead to a less robust California economy in the near future. Some have special significance for Los Angeles: * The high cost of housing. Areas of urban, coastal California are increasingly unaffordable for people with average incomes. Since 1985, prices of existing homes have soared 40% in the state, with even higher escalation in Los Angeles County. * Traffic congestion.
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BUSINESS
April 3, 1989 | JONATHAN PETERSON, Times Staff Writer
Forecasting the economy can be a lonely business. Just ask Larry J. Kimbell. The UCLA professor still looks pained when he recalls the time he warned California Gov. Jerry Brown of a recession. Brown--who had hoped for a favorable forecast to back up his spending plans--was disappointed. He responded with a pointed question: Did Kimbell want university faculty members to have a pay raise that year?
BUSINESS
April 3, 1989 | JONATHAN PETERSON, Times Staff Writer
Forecasting the economy can be a lonely business. Just ask Larry J. Kimbell. The UCLA professor still looks pained when he recalls the time he warned California Gov. Jerry Brown of a recession. Brown--who had hoped for a favorable forecast to back up his spending plans--was disappointed. He responded with a pointed question: Did Kimbell want university faculty members to have a pay raise that year?
BUSINESS
April 3, 1989 | JONATHAN PETERSON
Is slower growth on the horizon? A new UCLA economic forecast highlights five forces that could lead to a less robust California economy in the near future. Some have special significance for Los Angeles: * The high cost of housing. Areas of urban, coastal California are increasingly unaffordable for people with average incomes. Since 1985, prices of existing homes have soared 40% in the state, with even higher escalation in Los Angeles County. * Traffic congestion.
BUSINESS
June 15, 1999
Apartment industry specialists will present practical techniques to help investors make buying and selling decisions, and will provide forecasts of local property values June 24 at the first Apartment Building Forecast Conference, hosted by the Center for Real Estate at UCLA's Anderson School of Business and CB Richard Ellis. The conference, scheduled for 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1987 | JONATHAN PETERSON, Times Staff Writer
Consumer spending, the engine that has powered much of the economic recovery since 1982, is running out of steam amid higher inflation, debt and persistently low savings, according to two California-based economic forecasts released Thursday. "Growth in consumer spending will drop dramatically this year because the jump in inflation will cause a fall-off in the growth of disposable income," said Daniel T. Van Dyke, a Bank of America vice president and senior economist.
NEWS
September 24, 1987
Economists at UCLA's John E. Anderson Graduate School of Management have predicted stronger economic growth in the third quarter of 1987 than in recent years, according to the UCLA Business Forecast Conference. But because of a substantial increase in long-term interest rates and a weaker U. S. dollar, they said, the strong growth is not expected to last more than a few quarters. Larry J.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1995 | CLAUDIA ELLER and JAMES BATES
The three moguls behind DreamWorks, having spent the past five months selling their idea of a new studio to Hollywood and Wall Street, are now greasing the wheels of government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1994
California, finally, appears to be joining the rest of the nation in an economic recovery. The state is three years behind, but job gains and an uptick in the housing market are putting it on a recovery track, albeit a slow and perhaps fragile one. That's the latest assessment from the UCLA Business Forecasting Project, which for each of the last few years has had to report the gloomy prospect of a prolonged economic slump--California's worst since the Great Depression.
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