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Larry King

ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2012 | By Meredith Blake
Larry King will moderate a debate among the third-party presidential candidates on Oct. 23, the Free and Equal Elections Foundation announced on Tuesday. The debate, which will be held in Chicago, will feature Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson, Green Party candidate Jill Stein, Constitution Party candidate Virgil Goode, and Rocky Anderson  of the newly formed Justice Party. The event will be broadcast live on Ora TV, the digital programming service where King launched his online talk show, “Larry King Now,” earlier this year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2012 | By Meg James, Los Angeles Times
For Larry King, the death of Osama bin Laden provided an awakening. The veteran talk show host had been nudged toward the door by CNN in 2010 after 25 years of interviewing such titans as Frank Sinatra, Tom Cruise and Barack Obama. After that, King had been giving inspirational speeches in far-flung countries, doing an occasional stand-up comedy routine and taping a few TV specials for CNN. One was supposed to run on a Sunday in May 2011. King had dinner guests over that night for a viewing party.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2012 | By Meg James
Hulu interrupted the afternoon's regularly scheduled programming for a commercial message: The 4-year-old service no longer is just a place to catch up on missed episodes of broadcast network shows such as “Modern Family” and “Family Guy.”  Tuesday, executives with the online video service were intent on showcasing their eclectic mix of newly added and upcoming shows, including “Prisoners of War,” an award-winning Israeli series that...
BUSINESS
July 16, 2012 | By Meg James, Los Angeles Times
Larry King intends to prove that he's not too old to break into a new medium: the Internet. The 78-year-old broadcaster came out of retirement Monday to debut "Larry King Now," a new 30-minute talk show available on the popular online video service Hulu. The Internet production marks King's return to news and entertainment after his long-running CNN series,"Larry King Live," ended in December 2010 after 25 years and nearly 7,000 shows. Unlike his hourlong call-in cable program, a nightly fixture, new shows are scheduled to be posted online Monday through Thursday about 3 p.m. Pacific time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2011 | Catherine Saillant
The Oxnard junior high where the shooting took place has returned to its usual rhythms, with teachers struggling to keep antsy seventh- and eighth-graders focused on midterms before the holiday break. The portable computer lab tucked at the back of the schoolyard -- the place where Larry King was gunned down in front of 25 of his classmates -- has reopened. It's been four years since it happened, and the students here have no direct connection to the day E.O. Green Junior High became part of a national story.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2011 | By Catherine Saillant, Los Angeles Times
The father of a gay Oxnard junior high school student spilled his rage in a Ventura courtroom Monday, telling the convicted killer that he could not forgive him for shooting his son "with the precision of a cold-blooded assassin. " Greg King, reading a biting four-page statement to the court before Brandon McInerney was sentenced to 21 years in state prison, called jurors "incompetent" for failing to reach a verdict in the September murder trial, criticized the media for its coverage of the high-profile case and heaped blame on school officials for failing to watch over his son's well-being.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2011 | By Catherine Saillant and Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
Ventura County prosecutors, trying for a second time to convict a former middle school student of fatally shooting a gay classmate, will drop the key allegation that the crime was motivated by a hatred of homosexuals. The announcement came Tuesday as several jurors from the original trial, which ended last month in a hung jury, expressed strong misgivings about the prosecution's case. They said they didn't believe Brandon McInerney killed Larry King because the boy was gay and urged that he be tried in Juvenile Court instead of as an adult.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2011 | By Mark Olsen
In 1994, a young Philadelphia man named Justin Duerr began to notice the series of tile mosaics appliquéd to the pavement all over town. The tiles contained a message that seemed to draw a line from historian Arnold Toynbee to Stanley Kubrick's "2001," while expressing the notion that humans could be resurrected. And something about Jupiter. Duerr began researching and investigating the origins of the strange tiles, meeting other curious folks who wanted to know who or what was behind these odd pieces and whether they were some sort of naive art project, the work of a troubled mind or a genuine message from the cosmos.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2011 | Sandy Banks
Neither family was satisfied when the jury deadlocked last week in the trial of an Oxnard teenager charged with murdering a gay middle-school classmate before stunned students in an English class. The parents of the dead boy, Larry King, stormed out of court when the mistrial was announced. The mother of defendant Brandon McInerney buried her face in her hands, slumped and sobbed. The jury was stuck between murder and manslaughter; torn, like much of a troubled public, between competing scenarios: Was Brandon an angry white supremacist who plotted the killing because he despised Larry for being gay?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2011 | By Catherine Saillant and Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
Prosecutors vowed to immediately retry a former middle school student who shot a gay classmate, maintaining that the incident was a premeditated murder and a hate crime despite doubts by some jurors who deadlocked in the case. But prosecutors said they are considering whether to again try Brandon McInerney as an adult, a choice that legal experts believe made it harder for them to win a conviction. McInerney, who was 14 at the time of the killing, would face up to life in prison if he were convicted as an adult.
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