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Larry Klayman

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NEWS
April 20, 1998 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He thinks of himself as a conservative Ralph Nader and terms his nonprofit organization the American Civil Liberties Union of the right. Administration officials prefer to ignore him. But his propensity for taking them to court often means they can't. Washington lawyer Larry Klayman, founder of the group Judicial Watch, is all the more troublesome to President Clinton and other foes because he is seemingly undeterred by either criticism or setbacks.
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NEWS
April 20, 1998 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He thinks of himself as a conservative Ralph Nader and terms his nonprofit organization the American Civil Liberties Union of the right. Administration officials prefer to ignore him. But his propensity for taking them to court often means they can't. Washington lawyer Larry Klayman, founder of the group Judicial Watch, is all the more troublesome to President Clinton and other foes because he is seemingly undeterred by either criticism or setbacks.
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NEWS
October 5, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Invoking Belgium's far-reaching war crimes law, Cuban exiles filed a lawsuit against President Fidel Castro for crimes against humanity. The complaint, which covers alleged false imprisonment, murder and torture, was handed to an investigating judge at the Brussels criminal court. The judge will decide whether the case against the 75-year-old leader is admissible.
NATIONAL
June 29, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Led by a chief justice who some conservatives immediately branded a turncoat, the Supreme Court upheld most of President Obama's healthcare law Thursday, resolving a high-stakes constitutional clash not seen in decades and handing Obama a victory that surprised many in Washington. Chief Justice John G. RobertsJr.and the four liberal justices joined to uphold the Democrats' most ambitious social legislation in a generation. The unpopular requirement that everyone buy health insurance or pay a penalty - likened by detractors to a rule that everyone purchase broccoli - was unconstitutional as a mandate, Roberts said, but valid as long as it was simply considered a tax. "We do not consider whether the act embodies sound policies," wrote Roberts, a conservative appointed to the court by PresidentGeorge W. Bushin 2005.
NATIONAL
April 16, 2004 | From Associated Press
Former New Hampshire Sen. Bob Smith on Thursday ended his campaign for a Senate seat in his new home of Florida, citing a poor start to fundraising. The Republican raised only $66,000 in a crowded campaign that features five GOP candidates who have topped the $1-million mark. "In spite of our best effort, we just didn't raise enough money to make the campaign viable," said Smith, who had only about 1% support in recent polls.
NEWS
April 11, 2001 | From Associated Press
Judicial Watch, a conservative group that gained prominence by repeatedly suing the Clinton administration, is taking legal action against House Republican Leader Tom DeLay of Texas over allegations he tried to raise political donations by promising meetings with Bush administration officials. "It is improper and illegal to sell official public office for political campaign contributions," said Judicial Watch chairman and general counsel Larry Klayman.
NEWS
February 7, 1997 | From Associated Press
Federal marshals are searching for former White House personnel security chief D. Craig Livingstone to serve him with a lawsuit alleging that he mishandled the FBI background files of White House employees. U.S. District Judge Royce C. Lamberth dispatched the marshals to find Livingstone and his former employee, Anthony Marceca, after lawyers for former White House employees said Wednesday that the men have ducked service of the lawsuit for the last five months.
NATIONAL
September 12, 2003 | From Reuters
A federal appeals court Thursday refused to reconsider its ruling against Vice President Dick Cheney in his effort to keep secret the documents of his energy task force. The U.S. Court of Appeals voted 5 to 3 against rehearing the case, leaving Cheney and his Justice Department lawyers with the options of either appealing to the U.S. Supreme Court or complying with a lower court order to release information about White House contacts with the energy industry.
NEWS
February 13, 2002 | From Associated Press
A federal judge directed the White House on Tuesday to save records from energy task force meetings and warned the Bush administration it must take seriously a private group's lawsuit seeking the records. President Bush has refused to turn over records of meetings with Enron executives and others who advised the administration on energy policy last year. Congress' investigative arm, the General Accounting Office, is expected to sue soon for the records' release.
NEWS
October 2, 2001 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid a thick list of orders issued Monday by the Supreme Court, one stood out: "Bill Clinton of New York, New York, is suspended from the practice of law in this Court . . . requiring him to show cause why he should not be disbarred." Court officials said the action was the automatic result of the former president's five-year disbarment in Arkansas, a condition he agreed to in January as part of his settlement with the Whitewater independent counsel's office.
NATIONAL
December 8, 2002 | From Associated Press
A conservative watchdog group is seeking a criminal investigation into the U.S. Postal Service's handling of last year's anthrax contamination that killed two workers at a Washington post office. Judicial Watch submitted documents to a federal prosecutor that it says prove postal and government officials knew anthrax spores had leaked from a letter sent to Sen. Tom Daschle (D-S.D.) into the Brentwood mail processing center but neither warned workers nor shut the site.
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