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Larry Lasker

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1992 | KENT BLACK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It may be fortunate for society that Walter Parkes, Larry Lasker and Phil Alden Robinson have focused their talents on Hollywood rather than the world of organized (or disorganized) crime. Otherwise, a number of financial institutions and technological research institutes might have found themselves missing a few significant items over the years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1992 | KENT BLACK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It may be fortunate for society that Walter Parkes, Larry Lasker and Phil Alden Robinson have focused their talents on Hollywood rather than the world of organized (or disorganized) crime. Otherwise, a number of financial institutions and technological research institutes might have found themselves missing a few significant items over the years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1986 | John M. Wilson
20th Century Fox executives may not want you to know it, but the mysterious title of their big Christmas entry, "Project X," was once what it sounds like--a working title. We called about the vagueness of the title, mentioning marketing problems that beset Orion's "F/X" (now called "Murder by Illusion" for European release). But Fox brass had a only a curt reply: "We respectfully decline comment on the matter."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1988 | MICHAEL CIEPLY
Once upon a time in Hollywood----three or four years ago, actually--a ferocious band of movie makers called the Independents came out of Nowhere to take the town by storm. Talk about chutzpah! For eons and eons, Hollywood--the movie capital, where the River of Bankability flowed with glitz and celluloid--had been ruled by the Major Studios. All was calm in the land between the Sea of Red Ink and the Ocean of Profit. According to legend, there were seven fearsome Majors. Or maybe there were 10.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1994 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David Scott Lewis calls himself an "infomaniac." In 1975, when he was 17, he built a personal computer from the first available Altair kits. He became a "hacker" and served as a consultant to "WarGames," a 1983 film about a teen-age computer nerd who nearly triggers a nuclear war. Today, the 35-year-old Lewis cruises the Internet, the global electronic supernetwork known simply as "the Net" that links 20,000 computer networks and boasts 20 million users.
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