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Larry Levitt

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NEWS
September 21, 1993 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
These five Californians made key contributions to President Clinton's health reform plan. Alain Enthoven * Age: 63 * Occupation: Marriner S. Eccles professor of public and private management, Stanford Business School. Has held positions as an economist with the Rand Corp. and as an assistant secretary of defense. Helped England and the Netherlands reform their health care systems.
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BUSINESS
January 14, 2014 | By Noam N. Levey
WASHINGTON - More than 2.1 million Americans signed up for health insurance in the last three months of 2013 through new online marketplaces created by President Obama's healthcare law as a December surge in enrollment helped the initiative recover from its disastrous launch. But the enrollment numbers - released in a government report Monday - lagged behind the Obama administration's target of 3.3 million sign-ups by the end of December. With nearly 500,000 enrollees through Dec. 28, California, which runs its own health insurance marketplace, continues to top all other states by a wide margin.
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NEWS
January 13, 2014 | By Noam N. Levey
WASHINGTON - More than 2.1 million Americans signed up for health insurance in the last three months of 2013 through new online marketplaces created by President Obama's health law, as a December surge in enrollment helped the initiative recover from its disastrous launch. But the enrollment numbers, released in a government report Monday, lag the Obama administration targets. The data also suggest the marketplaces are still far more popular among older consumers, a trend that threatens to push up premiums unless more young, healthy Americans sign up for insurance.
NEWS
January 13, 2014 | By Noam N. Levey
WASHINGTON - More than 2.1 million Americans signed up for health insurance in the last three months of 2013 through new online marketplaces created by President Obama's health law, as a December surge in enrollment helped the initiative recover from its disastrous launch. But the enrollment numbers, released in a government report Monday, lag the Obama administration targets. The data also suggest the marketplaces are still far more popular among older consumers, a trend that threatens to push up premiums unless more young, healthy Americans sign up for insurance.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2014 | By Noam N. Levey
WASHINGTON - More than 2.1 million Americans signed up for health insurance in the last three months of 2013 through new online marketplaces created by President Obama's healthcare law as a December surge in enrollment helped the initiative recover from its disastrous launch. But the enrollment numbers - released in a government report Monday - lagged behind the Obama administration's target of 3.3 million sign-ups by the end of December. With nearly 500,000 enrollees through Dec. 28, California, which runs its own health insurance marketplace, continues to top all other states by a wide margin.
HEALTH
February 18, 2002 | BENEDICT CAREY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of thousands of Americans watched this weekend as a desperate father held a hospital emergency room at gunpoint and demanded a heart transplant for his dying son. Fortunately for everyone, it all happened in a movie, "John Q," which opened Friday. The movie stars Denzel Washington as John Q.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2014 | By Chad Terhune
After overcoming website glitches and long waits to get Obamacare, some patients are now running into frustrating new roadblocks at the doctor's office. A month into the most sweeping changes to healthcare in half a century, people are having trouble finding doctors at all, getting faulty information on which ones are covered and receiving little help from insurers swamped by new business. Experts have warned for months that the logjam was inevitable. But the extent of the problems is taking by surprise many patients - and even doctors - as frustrations mount.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2001 | SARAH HALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About a third of California employers that offer their workers health-care coverage are considering switching to a so-called defined-contribution approach that pays employees to buy their own insurance while reducing costs for companies, according to a survey to be released today.
BUSINESS
June 18, 1998 | From Associated Press
As the cost of managed health care rises, small-business owners are preparing to pay a little more for their employees' benefits if it helps them hold on to experienced workers. After years of moderate price increases, several managed-care companies have announced larger increases for 1999. Meanwhile, Congress is working on consumer protection legislation that could give consumers more flexibility in their health plans, but at a higher cost.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1999 | From Associated Press
Americans are generally happy with their health insurance coverage, but four in 10 adults say insurers have a bigger say than doctors in the care they receive, according to a new poll. Women are more critical than men, with 40% saying the health-care system is in worse shape than it was five years ago, said the poll conducted for Associated Press. The biggest complaint was that managed-care organizations limit the number of doctors from which people can choose.
NEWS
September 21, 1993 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
These five Californians made key contributions to President Clinton's health reform plan. Alain Enthoven * Age: 63 * Occupation: Marriner S. Eccles professor of public and private management, Stanford Business School. Has held positions as an economist with the Rand Corp. and as an assistant secretary of defense. Helped England and the Netherlands reform their health care systems.
BUSINESS
June 5, 2007 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
The nation's largest public pension fund already wields its huge clout to get the lowest possible rates and best healthcare coverage for 1.2 million government workers and retirees. But now the California Public Employees' Retirement System wants to drive down soaring medical costs even more by investing $700 million in cutting-edge companies that find new ways to make medical care more efficient.
NEWS
March 3, 2000 | By ALISSA J. RUBIN,
The fight over whether to tighten federal regulation of managed health care moved into a make-or-break phase Thursday in Congress as lawmakers sought to hammer out a compromise on two versions of a patients' bill of rights. If they are to deliver a bill to President Clinton by Easter as they have promised, Republican leaders will have to reconcile a tough House bill with a version passed by the Senate that has weaker patient protections and would cover far fewer people.
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