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Larry Mcmurtry

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2010 | By Tim Rutten, Los Angeles Times
In 1941, the visionary German dramatist and poet, Bertolt Brecht, newly arrived in Los Angeles, where he hoped to make his fortune as a screenwriter, wrote these lines: Every morning, to earn my bread, I go to the market, where lies are bought. Hopefully I join the ranks of the sellers. " Hollywood: A Third Memoir" is the distinguished writer Larry McMurtry's delightfully episodic account of his long, profitable and generally rather enjoyable engagement with the movie industry — or, to borrow Brecht's phrase, his time among the sellers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2013 | Los Angeles Times wire services
Author John Graves, whose 1960 book "Goodbye to a River" and authentic depictions of rural Texas made him one of the state's most celebrated and beloved writers, has died. He was 92. Graves died Wednesday at the home he called Hard Scrabble near Glen Rose, Texas, said W.K. "Kip" Stratton, president of the Texas Institute of Letters. Graves had been in declining health since breaking his hip several years ago. He was best known for "Goodbye to a River," a memoir of a canoe trip down the Brazos River that chronicled nature in masterful language and used history and philosophy to capture a sense of place.
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NEWS
August 8, 2012 | by Carolyn Kellogg
Larry McMurtry is known for writing books (and screenplays), but he is also a bookseller. For many years, McMurtry has collected and sold rare books from the town of Archer City, Texas. He has bookstores filled with hundreds of thousands of rare, antiquarian and collectible books. Friday, they go on sale. Most of them, anyway: McMurtry is auctioning the contents of several stores, save one . And it's keeping 150,000 books in stock. In addition to being a significant book collector and bookseller, McMurtry has a stunning publishing record and screenwriting career.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
"Being a writer and a Texan," Larry McMurtry wrote in the late 1960s, "is an amusing fate. " What he was addressing was the shift, in the years after World War II, "from the land to the cities" and what he saw as "the dying of … the rural, pastoral way of life. " How was one to write about a place where the old myths (the cowboy, the ranch, the open plain) lingered, even as they were superseded by the new? The solution, McMurtry decided, was to zero in on this new Texas, to write about, and from, the cities, to leave the past in its place.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Last week, Larry McMurtry's career as a book dealer took center stage. McMurtry is, of course, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of "Lonesome Dove" and dozens of other novels, including "The Last Picture Show," "Texasville" and "Terms of Endearment. " He's also familiar with Hollywood -- many of his books have been successfully adapted to film and in 2006, he won an Oscar for co-writing the screenplay of "Brokeback Mountain. " All that was set aside as McMurtry, who's been selling collectible books for 55 years, put 300,000 of them up for sale.
NEWS
November 12, 1995 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pulitzer Prize-winning author Larry McMurtry and his collaborator Diana Ossana are living pretty much in a "Lonesome Dove" world these days. "Larry McMurtry's Streets of Laredo," the five-hour miniseries based on his 1993 sequel to "Lonesome Dove," airs Sunday and Tuesday on CBS. McMurtry and Ossana penned the screenplay based on his novel and also are executive producers.
BOOKS
August 16, 1987 | Charles Champlin
Larry McMurtry, whose novels-into-films include "Hud," "The Last Picture Show," "Leaving Cheyenne" (filmed by Sidney Lumet as "Lovin' Molly") and "Terms of Endearment," knows his way around Hollywood and is not much enchanted by what he sees. "With rare exceptions," he says in an introduction to "Film Flam," "the pictures coming out of Hollywood today are the last resorts of the gutless. In my opinion, a little film flam is all such an industry deserves."
NEWS
February 12, 1989 | EDMUND NEWTON, Times Staff Writer
For a writer whose novels are often set under big Western skies and populated with ranchers and gunslingers, Larry McMurtry is strikingly bookish. Here is a man who, any day, would rather be nosing through dusty volumes than kicking sod on the prairie. Although he is the son of a West Texas rancher, McMurtry, whose Pulitzer Prize-winning epic "Lonesome Dove" was serialized in four parts on CBS-TV starting last Sunday, confessed one night recently that he never quite got the hang of cowpoking.
BOOKS
October 30, 1988 | Robert Gish, Gish is the author of "Frontier's End: The Life and Literature of Harvey Fergusson," just published by the University of Nebraska Press
There's much about the Old West and the Western novel that should stay dead and gone: the gun-slinging violence, the racism and sexism (all so predictable and stereotyped when "novelized"), the cussing and carousing--all the qualities that made the West so wild. But the West (old and new), as everyone knows, is a big place and its telling, remembering and imagining take many forms--in fiction and in fact.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2004 | Peter Lefcourt, Special to The Times
IN his funky 2000 celebration of the American highway, "Roads," Larry McMurtry, the consummate Texan, writes of Los Angeles with the affectionate exasperation of a native. "The freeways of Los Angeles have been my Ganges; for forty years I have been making my way up and down them, stalled as often as the Newbys were on the holy river."
NEWS
December 11, 2012 | By Chris Erskine
Snow carvers from around the world will call North Lake Tahoe home Feb. 8-13, for the first-ever Carve Tahoe competition. For details, click here www.carvetahoe.com . . . . Writing workshops, daily readings and other gatherings by screenwriters, songwriters, playwrights and poets will be featured at the Ojai WordFest, April 6-13. Info: www.ojaivisitors.com . . . . Look for lots of ski deals, now until Christmas. Big Bear's midweek lift and lodging packages start as low as $69 per person per night, double occupancy.
NEWS
September 5, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
News that Tales of the Lonesome Pine bookshop in Virginia is looking for a bookstore-sitter this fall has been embraced by everyone from Jacket Copy to NPR as a charming idea. In exchange for room and board, the sitter gets a rustic setting, a couple of pets to care for and a bookstore to watch over. Who wouldn't want to give it a try? Scott Brown, for one. He's one of the owners of Eureka Books , an antiquarian bookstore in Eureka, Calif. He slams the idea of leaving a bookstore in the hands of an unpaid volunteer.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Last week, Larry McMurtry's career as a book dealer took center stage. McMurtry is, of course, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of "Lonesome Dove" and dozens of other novels, including "The Last Picture Show," "Texasville" and "Terms of Endearment. " He's also familiar with Hollywood -- many of his books have been successfully adapted to film and in 2006, he won an Oscar for co-writing the screenplay of "Brokeback Mountain. " All that was set aside as McMurtry, who's been selling collectible books for 55 years, put 300,000 of them up for sale.
NEWS
August 14, 2012 | by Carolyn Kellogg
On Monday, the good folks at Goodreads announced they'd reached a milestone: 10 million registered users.  "We've come a long way since Elizabeth and I built Goodreads from our living room, motivated by the belief that there was a better way to discover and discuss good books - and that we could build it," wrote founder Otis Chandler on the Goodreads blog. When Goodreads launched in January 2007 as a social networking site for book lovers, it was the new kid on the block. Another social reading site, LibraryThing, was performing a similar service, allowing people to catalog their libraries online and share ideas around books.
NEWS
August 8, 2012 | by Carolyn Kellogg
Larry McMurtry is known for writing books (and screenplays), but he is also a bookseller. For many years, McMurtry has collected and sold rare books from the town of Archer City, Texas. He has bookstores filled with hundreds of thousands of rare, antiquarian and collectible books. Friday, they go on sale. Most of them, anyway: McMurtry is auctioning the contents of several stores, save one . And it's keeping 150,000 books in stock. In addition to being a significant book collector and bookseller, McMurtry has a stunning publishing record and screenwriting career.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2011
Aleph A Novel Paulo Coelho Alfred A. Knopf, $24.95 A crisis of faith prompts a man to begin a journey of self-discovery from Africa to Asia. The Angel Esmeralda Nine Stories Don DeLillo Scribner, $24 The first collection of short stories from a defining American voice in contemporary fiction. The Art of Fielding A Novel Chad Harbach Little, Brown, $25.99 The complicated nature of relationships revolving around a gifted college baseball player.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2007 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
LATE middle age is suffused with ambiguous mercies. One gradually loses, for example, the ability to distinguish between resignation and happiness. At the end of the day, though, what's gained and lost needs to add up to something, because age without wisdom is a sad thing and about as close as you get to a wasted life.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2011
Jon Bon Jovi's "pay-what-you-can" charity restaurant in New Jersey is open for business. The rocker said Wednesday that Soul Kitchen in Red Bank is designed to help the hungry without the stigma of a soup kitchen. There are no prices on the menu. Diners pay whatever they're able to. Those without money can still eat provided they're willing to work in the restaurant or perform some community service. The restaurant operates out of a former auto body shop near the Red Bank, N.J., train station.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2011 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Long, Last, Happy New and Selected Stories Barry Hannah Grove Press: 462 pp., $27.50 I've never had much use for the concept of the "writer's writer. " It's a backhanded compliment, a way of suggesting that an author is too obscure, weird, nuanced or flat-out inaccessible to appeal to a general readership. Writer's writers also rarely end up well: They burn out and work the lecture circuit or turn to drugs and drink. Malcolm Lowry never published another book during his lifetime after the novel "Under the Volcano" appeared in 1947.
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