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Larry Mcwilliams

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SPORTS
September 3, 1989
The Kansas City Royals acquired veteran left-handed pitcher Larry McWilliams from the Philadelphia Phillies for a player to be named. McWilliams, 35, was 2-11 with a 4.10 earned-run average this season.
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SPORTS
September 20, 1989 | DAN HAFNER
Three weeks ago, Larry McWilliams was having a horrible season with the Philadelphia Phillies. He was 2-11 and had not won since May 13. But the 35-year-old left-hander is now playing a part in the Kansas City Royals' bid to stay in the race in the American League West. McWilliams held the Chicago White Sox to six hits in seven innings Tuesday night at Kansas City as the Royals beat Chicago, 5-3, to remain 3 1/2 games behind the Oakland Athletics.
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SPORTS
September 20, 1989 | DAN HAFNER
Three weeks ago, Larry McWilliams was having a horrible season with the Philadelphia Phillies. He was 2-11 and had not won since May 13. But the 35-year-old left-hander is now playing a part in the Kansas City Royals' bid to stay in the race in the American League West. McWilliams held the Chicago White Sox to six hits in seven innings Tuesday night at Kansas City as the Royals beat Chicago, 5-3, to remain 3 1/2 games behind the Oakland Athletics.
SPORTS
September 3, 1989
The Kansas City Royals acquired veteran left-handed pitcher Larry McWilliams from the Philadelphia Phillies for a player to be named. McWilliams, 35, was 2-11 with a 4.10 earned-run average this season.
SPORTS
May 26, 1988 | Associated Press
Larry McWilliams is glad he made that second phone call last winter. "There wasn't anybody there the first time I called," McWilliams said Wednesday after he pitched St. Louis to a 6-0 victory over the Cincinnati Reds. "I called back. Obviously, in my situation, I was looking for anybody that wanted me." McWilliams, a minor league pitcher a year ago, pitched a two-hitter for his first shutout since Aug. 1, 1984, and first complete game since June 16, 1985.
SPORTS
May 9, 1985 | MARC APPLEMAN, Times Staff Writer
In the 1985 Elias Baseball Analyst, Pirate left-hander Larry McWilliams names Padre catcher Terry Kennedy as the hitter he loves to face the most. And Kennedy lists McWilliams as the pitcher he hates to face the most. But on a cool Wednesday evening at San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium, a crowd of 25,770 saw Kennedy hit a three-run double off McWilliams to send the Padres and undefeated Andy Hawkins (6-0) on their way to an easy 12-2 win over the Pittsburgh Pirates.
SPORTS
April 13, 1985 | Associated Press
Jason Thompson drilled a two-run homer to key a four-run first inning as the Pittsburgh Pirates celebrated their home opener Friday night with a 6-4 victory over the St. Louis Cardinals. The Pirates, held to two runs and nine hits in a pair of season-opening losses to the Chicago Cubs, collected 10 hits off four St. Louis pitchers, including Doug Frobel's two-run single in the first inning.
SPORTS
May 26, 1988 | Associated Press
Larry McWilliams is glad he made that second phone call last winter. "There wasn't anybody there the first time I called," McWilliams said Wednesday after he pitched St. Louis to a 6-0 victory over the Cincinnati Reds. "I called back. Obviously, in my situation, I was looking for anybody that wanted me." McWilliams, a minor league pitcher a year ago, pitched a two-hitter for his first shutout since Aug. 1, 1984, and first complete game since June 16, 1985.
SPORTS
May 9, 1985 | MARC APPLEMAN, Times Staff Writer
In the 1985 Elias Baseball Analyst, Pirate left-hander Larry McWilliams names Padre catcher Terry Kennedy as the hitter he loves to face the most. And Kennedy lists McWilliams as the pitcher he hates to face the most. But on a cool Wednesday evening at San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium, a crowd of 25,770 saw Kennedy hit a three-run double off McWilliams to send the Padres and undefeated Andy Hawkins (6-0) on their way to an easy 12-2 win over the Pittsburgh Pirates.
SPORTS
May 15, 1988 | Associated Press
Jose Oquendo became the first non-pitcher in 20 seasons to get a decision, taking the loss in the 19th inning Saturday night when Ken Griffey's two-out, two-run double gave the Atlanta Braves a 7-5 win over the St. Louis Cardinals. Oquendo, an all-purpose utility player, was forced to pitch four innings in the 5-hour 40-minute game when the Cardinals ran out of pitchers. He shut out the Braves for three innings until the 19th. Oquendo allowed four hits, walked six and struck out one.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2001
* Kenneth Cole Productions Inc. reported a 32% rise in fourth-quarter earnings to $11.3 million, or 52 cents a share, but the apparel retailer said it expects profit to fall well short of analysts' forecasts for the current year. Revenue increased 17% to $110 million. The company said it expects to earn $1.85 a share in 2001, rather than the $2.17-a-share average estimate of analysts polled by First Call, blaming a difficult retailing environment amid a slowing U.S. economy. * Campbell Soup Co.
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