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BUSINESS
February 19, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Google's stock crossed $800 for the first time Monday -- a feat never before achieved by a technology company. The $800 club that Google just joined is a pretty exclusive one . And though the all-time high for Google is largely symbolic, analysts are crediting Larry Page, its co-founder and chief executive, for the search giant's dramatic resurgence since he took back the helm nearly two years ago. Under his leadership, the...
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2014 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, This post has been updated, as indicated below
The Internet's most dominant online video site is about to get a new boss. Google ad executive Susan Wojcicki appears will become the next head of YouTube, according to reports published by online sites The Information and Re/code. The executive would succeed Salar Kamangar, who has run the unit since YouTube co-founder Chad Hurley left the company in 2010. A YouTube spokeswoman could not be immediately reached for comment. UPDATE: Confirming the appointment, Google chief executive Larry Page said in a statement, "Salar and the whole YouTube team have built something amazing.  Like Salar, Susan has a healthy disregard for the impossible and is excited about improving YouTube in ways that people will love.
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BUSINESS
April 1, 2011 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
Larry Page wants to run Google Inc. like it's 1999. The co-founder of the Internet search giant has begun an unusual afternoon ritual of sitting and working with his top executives on small couches in an open area of the company's Mountain View, Calif., headquarters. Employees, who used to have to stalk Page around campus, can drop by and grab a few minutes of his time. "Now there are no layers to go through," said Michael Cassidy, director of search product management at Google.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
To celebrate its 15th anniversary, Google is letting users time travel and see what the search engine website looked like when it launched. When users go to Google.com and search for "Google in 1998" the website transforms from its modern 2013 design to replicate what it looked like back in the late '90s. Complete with an exclamation mark at the end of "Google," the retro website shows just how far web design has come since its early days. The 1998 version of Google is a plain white page with Google's original bulky-letter logo and no ads. PHOTOS: Top 11 cool, hidden features in Apple's iOS 7 Users will also notice the old-fashioned website lacks any other types of searches, such as "Images," "Videos," or "News.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Make no mistake about it, Larry Page has his sights set on the future. The Google co-founder and chief executive discussed his company's big bets such as YouTube, Android and Chrome, but focused on more speculative bets such as Google Glass and Google Fiber during a conference call with analysts to discuss first-quarter financial results. "Companies tend to get comfortable doing what they've always done, with only a few minor tweaks. It's only natural to work on the things you know," Page said.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Google Chief Executive Larry Page isn't living in the moment -- that moment being not so great , what with the average rate for ads in the second quarter falling 6% when analysts thought they'd fall 3%. Page says he's living in the future. Google will continue to invest in all of those highly risky, long-term bets such as high-altitude balloons to bring Internet access to remote areas, self-driving cars and, of course, Glass, he told analysts during a second-quarter earnings call Thursday.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2011 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
The Larry Page era has officially begun — with a management shake-up. Just days after returning as Google Inc.'s chief executive, Page swiftly set the tone for how he would run the Internet search giant with a major reorganization of his management team. Page is trying to restore the sense of urgency and innovation that drove Google's prior successes, analysts said. The reorganization also puts him firmly in charge of the world's largest Internet company in much the same way Steve Jobs runs Apple Inc. "Larry's coming out of the gate blazing," said BGC Partners analyst Colin Gillis.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2011 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
Larry Page got a second chance to make an impression on Wall Street. This one was definitely better than the first. Google Inc. posted a 36% surge in profit, blowing past analysts' expectations and overshadowing concerns about rising expenses and slowing growth. The stronger-than-expected performance countered critics who said Google's hyper-growth days were behind it. Google's chief executive stressed that the company's investments in its Android mobile device software and the Chrome Web browser would generate "huge new businesses for Google in the long run, just like search.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. - Even though its ubiquitous Internet search engine practically mints money, Google Inc. was widely seen as a company whose best days were behind it. It was written off as the next Microsoft Corp. - a staid high-tech giant in the shadows of Apple Inc. and Facebook Inc. that had lost its sense of urgency and innovative edge. But that sentiment has shifted dramatically over the last year, and when Google swings open the doors to its annual conference for software developers Wednesday, it won't just be showcasing its latest products.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - Google Inc. believes that making big gambles can yield revolutionary advances, whether it be cars that drive themselves, wearable computers connected to the Internet or air balloons that beam wireless Internet access to remote areas of the world. Now it's searching for ways to keep people alive longer. The technology giant said Wednesday that it's a major investor in a venture that would work on combating aging and disease. But Google declined to provide any more details on how the venture would operate or what it would do. Google is not the first technology company to make the leap into healthcare.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
MENLO PARK, Calif. -- Google went back to where it all began Thursday, to the Menlo Park garage where founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin first dreamed of a better search engine. The company opened up the Silicon Valley landmark to the media to celebrate its 15 th birthday. Neighbors say the garage doesn't get the busloads of tourists that regularly visit the Palo Alto garage of Hewlett-Packard or the Los Altos garage where Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak built the first Apple computers.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - Google Inc. believes that making big gambles can yield revolutionary advances, whether it be cars that drive themselves, wearable computers connected to the Internet or air balloons that beam wireless Internet access to remote areas of the world. Now it's searching for ways to keep people alive longer. The technology giant said Wednesday that it's a major investor in a venture that would work on combating aging and disease. But Google declined to provide any more details on how the venture would operate or what it would do. Google is not the first technology company to make the leap into healthcare.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Google Chief Executive Larry Page isn't living in the moment -- that moment being not so great , what with the average rate for ads in the second quarter falling 6% when analysts thought they'd fall 3%. Page says he's living in the future. Google will continue to invest in all of those highly risky, long-term bets such as high-altitude balloons to bring Internet access to remote areas, self-driving cars and, of course, Glass, he told analysts during a second-quarter earnings call Thursday.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
It hasn't even been on sale for a month, but already the Galaxy S 4 is about to sell its 10 millionth unit. Shin Jong-kyun, Samsung's co-chief executive, said the company believes the GS4 could hit that mark as soon as next week, according to the Korea Times. "It is selling much faster than the previous model S3,” Jong-kyun said on Thursday in Seoul. Samsung's Galaxy S III was one of the most popular smartphones to hit the market before the company rolled out the successor, GS4. Last year Samsung was also quick to hit the 10-million mark with the Galaxy S III, but that took all of two full months.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Months before the futuristic glasses become publicly available, Google Glass is already getting scrutiny from Capitol Hill. Eight members of Congress on Thursday sent a letter to Google Chief Executive Larry Page to ask what his company will do to protect people's privacy. The letter landed on the second day of Google's annual conference for software developers, many of whom are already wearing an early version of Google Glass. Developers paid $1,500 a pair for the Explorer prototype and are learning how to write software for the wearable computing device.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Just a day after taking to Google+ to reveal a vocal-cord ailment that has kept him out of the public eye, Google CEO Larry Page took to the stage at the Google I/O conference Wednesday and spoke for nearly an hour. Appearing before independent developers and tech reporters, Page talked about the potential of technology, keeping the industry open and the future of Google. In an unusual move for a tech company, Page also took questions from the audience to close the conference keynote.
BUSINESS
September 19, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Bill Gates has been the richest person in the country for an entire generation, cinching the top spot on Forbes' list of the 400 wealthiest Americans for the 19th consecutive year. That's what a net worth of $66 billion will do for a guy. Last year, he had $59 billion. Berkshire Hathaway Inc. head Warren Buffett, again in second place, trailed with $46 billion. The slacker. Larry Ellison, co-founder of Oracle Corp., was next with $41 billion. The rest of the top 10  was populated with the likes of the Koch brothers, the Wal-Mart Waltons and New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2014 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, This post has been updated, as indicated below
The Internet's most dominant online video site is about to get a new boss. Google ad executive Susan Wojcicki appears will become the next head of YouTube, according to reports published by online sites The Information and Re/code. The executive would succeed Salar Kamangar, who has run the unit since YouTube co-founder Chad Hurley left the company in 2010. A YouTube spokeswoman could not be immediately reached for comment. UPDATE: Confirming the appointment, Google chief executive Larry Page said in a statement, "Salar and the whole YouTube team have built something amazing.  Like Salar, Susan has a healthy disregard for the impossible and is excited about improving YouTube in ways that people will love.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google CEO Larry Page has come forward with the reason why he missed key company events in 2012. In a Google+ blog, the company co-founder said lingering problems with his voice caused him to miss Google's shareholders meeting and developers conference in 2012. His absences led some investors to raise questions about his ability to continue running the company. Until Tuesday, neither Page nor the company had elaborated on his health. Page, who took over as Google CEO in 2011, said that his problems stemmed from a bad cold 14 years ago that led his voice to become hoarse.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. - Even though its ubiquitous Internet search engine practically mints money, Google Inc. was widely seen as a company whose best days were behind it. It was written off as the next Microsoft Corp. - a staid high-tech giant in the shadows of Apple Inc. and Facebook Inc. that had lost its sense of urgency and innovative edge. But that sentiment has shifted dramatically over the last year, and when Google swings open the doors to its annual conference for software developers Wednesday, it won't just be showcasing its latest products.
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