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Larry Pressler

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NEWS
November 4, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Former GOP Sen. Larry Pressler returned to his hometown of Humboldt to announce his candidacy for the House of Representatives, the job that first took him to Washington in 1975. "I have enjoyed my time in private life. I'm refreshed, my batteries are recharged and I'm ready to go," Pressler, 59, told about 100 supporters. "It's a major job. It's a tough job," he said of the state's only House seat. He was first elected to the House in 1974. He won his first Senate term in 1978.
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NEWS
November 4, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Former GOP Sen. Larry Pressler returned to his hometown of Humboldt to announce his candidacy for the House of Representatives, the job that first took him to Washington in 1975. "I have enjoyed my time in private life. I'm refreshed, my batteries are recharged and I'm ready to go," Pressler, 59, told about 100 supporters. "It's a major job. It's a tough job," he said of the state's only House seat. He was first elected to the House in 1974. He won his first Senate term in 1978.
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NEWS
April 25, 1988 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
For Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), the moment came last month, when he realized it was the 15th anniversary of his release from a prisoner-of-war camp in Hanoi. "I said to myself, 'I think it's time,' " he says. For Sen. Larry Pressler (R-S.D.), the moment came early this month when he traveled to Vietnam and revisited the small town in the Mekong Delta where he served in the U.S. Army's pacification program in 1968.
OPINION
February 19, 1995
Your Feb. 5 editorial mildly chastising Sen. Larry Pressler (R-S.D.) for his "bizarre letter to the Corporation for Public Broadcasting" was a timid criticism inappropriate to his serious misconduct. Pressler demanded, under government authority, that CPB employees provide information on previous work experience to see who worked at "liberal" institutions. Based on your mild response, and the failure of our government institutions to strongly denounce his actions, the right-wing Pressler accomplished much of what he set out to accomplish.
NEWS
February 27, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
Even as White House aides worked feverishly on a last-ditch strategy for saving John Tower's nomination as defense secretary, they were confronted Sunday with fresh evidence of just how hard that task will be. The rescue plan was put together in weekend meetings and frantic telephone calls between Frederick D. McClure, the chief White House lobbyist, and White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu, who was traveling with President Bush in Asia.
OPINION
February 19, 1995
Your Feb. 5 editorial mildly chastising Sen. Larry Pressler (R-S.D.) for his "bizarre letter to the Corporation for Public Broadcasting" was a timid criticism inappropriate to his serious misconduct. Pressler demanded, under government authority, that CPB employees provide information on previous work experience to see who worked at "liberal" institutions. Based on your mild response, and the failure of our government institutions to strongly denounce his actions, the right-wing Pressler accomplished much of what he set out to accomplish.
NEWS
July 30, 1987 | Associated Press
The Apis mellifera , better known as the honeybee, has gained the spotlight on Capitol Hill with proposed legislation in the Senate to make it the country's national insect. The bill's sponsor, Sen. Larry Pressler (R-S.D.), noted that 13 states have "recognized the importance of the honeybee and designated it as their state insect. The entire nation should endorse the same recognition because the honeybee is a very important insect in areas such as agriculture" and wildlife.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1995 | Times Wire Services
Television: Glenn Jones, chairman of Jones Intercable Inc., one of the nation's largest cable companies, said Monday that the Englewood, Colo., firm's educational unit would like to take over the Public Broadcasting Service, which distributes programs to hundreds of public TV stations across the country. Jones' comments came in response to suggestions by House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) and the Senate's key GOP telecommunications policy architect, Larry Pressler (R-S.D.
NEWS
April 6, 1988
U.S. officials arrived in Hanoi for talks on the fate of more than 1,700 Americans still listed as missing in action from the Vietnam War and to receive the remains of 27 Americans--the largest number to be returned since the end of the war. A 25-member team of the Joint Casualty Resolution Center is to receive the remains today. Meanwhile, Nguyen Dy Nien, a deputy foreign minister, said the United States should help rebuild Vietnam if it wants a full accounting of MIAs.
BUSINESS
May 10, 1996 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bids to advance new kinds of broadcast technology ran afoul of some Capitol Hill lawmakers opposed to a federal effort to set a digital TV standard and a separate plan to let a Canadian firm launch a new nationwide radio station in the United States. The Federal Communications Commission on Thursday was scheduled to issue a license for CD Radio Inc. to operate a digital radio station whose satellite signals could reach listeners across the United States.
NEWS
February 27, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
Even as White House aides worked feverishly on a last-ditch strategy for saving John Tower's nomination as defense secretary, they were confronted Sunday with fresh evidence of just how hard that task will be. The rescue plan was put together in weekend meetings and frantic telephone calls between Frederick D. McClure, the chief White House lobbyist, and White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu, who was traveling with President Bush in Asia.
NEWS
April 25, 1988 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
For Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), the moment came last month, when he realized it was the 15th anniversary of his release from a prisoner-of-war camp in Hanoi. "I said to myself, 'I think it's time,' " he says. For Sen. Larry Pressler (R-S.D.), the moment came early this month when he traveled to Vietnam and revisited the small town in the Mekong Delta where he served in the U.S. Army's pacification program in 1968.
NEWS
April 12, 1993 | PAUL HOUSTON
GOLD RUSH: Senators are raking in political action committee money these days, holding fund-raisers even if they don't face reelection until 1996 or 1998. Sources say that many lawmakers are rushing to beat an anticipated congressional crackdown on donations by PACs (which are run by corporations, labor unions and other groups). "They're tapping into PACs before they have to vote against them," says a union lobbyist. . . .
BUSINESS
December 9, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Reform Bill Nears Completion: Conference chairman Sen. Larry Pressler (R-S.D.) and House leader Thomas J. Bliley (R-Va.) issued a joint letter saying they plan to resolve all "remaining outstanding issues" at a House-Senate conference committee meeting Tuesday. It will be only the second meeting of the conference committee, which is striving to produce a single telecommunications bill from differing House and Senate versions. The bill, rewriting the 1934 U.S.
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