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ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
NEW YORK - The mess at ground zero has been a collaborative production. The delays, backbiting, design compromises and massive cost overruns that have marked the rebuilding process at the World Trade Center site are the sorry collective work of politicians angling for higher office, architects turning Sept. 11 cynically to their advantage and city, state and federal bureaucrats working at cross purposes for years on end. But if you had to pick a leading villain in this decade-long black comedy, it would probably be developer Larry Silverstein.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
NEW YORK - The mess at ground zero has been a collaborative production. The delays, backbiting, design compromises and massive cost overruns that have marked the rebuilding process at the World Trade Center site are the sorry collective work of politicians angling for higher office, architects turning Sept. 11 cynically to their advantage and city, state and federal bureaucrats working at cross purposes for years on end. But if you had to pick a leading villain in this decade-long black comedy, it would probably be developer Larry Silverstein.
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BUSINESS
January 1, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Swiss Reinsurance Co. and 19 other insurers being sued by World Trade Center developer Larry Silverstein may use at trial a court ruling that the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the building complex were one occurrence, a judge ruled. Silverstein is suing the insurance companies, alleging that the two planes that hit the two towers constituted two attacks, and thus warrant two insurance payments of $3.55 billion each under the terms of his policies. The introduction of the Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2012 | By Sheri Linden
The incisive and absorbing "16 Acres" recaps 11 years of scrapped plans and anguished debates over ground zero, the site of Manhattan's fallen World Trade Center. The documentary tells a quintessential New York story of movers and shakers, but it's also a fascinating portrait of municipal and private interests trying to make headway in the charged atmosphere of devastating personal loss and wounded national pride. Through new interviews and archival footage, director-editor Richard Hankin (whose editing credits include "Capturing the Friedmans")
NATIONAL
April 30, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
World Trade Center leaseholder Larry Silverstein suffered a court defeat that means he won't get his $3.5-billion insurance policy paid twice over. In a partial verdict, a federal jury found that the majority of the insurers, who hold more than $1 billion of the policy, are bound by a form that defined the Sept. 11 attacks as one event. It was the first of at least two trials that will ultimately decide how much insurance money will be available to rebuild ground zero.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
New York developer Larry Silverstein and the California State Teachers Retirement System paid $400 million for 575 Lexington Ave., a 35-story office tower in Midtown Manhattan. Silverstein, leaseholder on the World Trade Center office space, and CalSTRS, the second-largest U.S. pension fund, formed the partnership this year and the purchase is its first. Silverstein and CalSTRS said in a statement they would spend as much as $2 billion on commercial properties in the New York area.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2012 | By Sheri Linden
The incisive and absorbing "16 Acres" recaps 11 years of scrapped plans and anguished debates over ground zero, the site of Manhattan's fallen World Trade Center. The documentary tells a quintessential New York story of movers and shakers, but it's also a fascinating portrait of municipal and private interests trying to make headway in the charged atmosphere of devastating personal loss and wounded national pride. Through new interviews and archival footage, director-editor Richard Hankin (whose editing credits include "Capturing the Friedmans")
SPORTS
September 23, 2010 | By Carla Hall
Jamie McCourt has testified that she would never have signed away her right to a share in the Dodgers, but on Thursday a Boston lawyer flatly denied she ever told him that. "She never indicated that she wanted ownership interest in the Dodgers or that she was willing to take on the risk" financially, said Larry Silverstein, who drew up the controversial 2004 marital property agreement that makes the Dodgers Frank McCourt's sole property and the couple's many homes Jamie's. On Silverstein's third day on the stand in the McCourts' divorce trial, he insisted that he followed the wishes of Jamie McCourt, whom he called "the driving force" behind the property agreement.
SPORTS
September 19, 2010 | By Bill Shaikin
The dispute over who owns the Dodgers may turn on one word. It is the 12th word of the second paragraph of the first exhibit of an agreement signed by Frank and Jamie McCourt six years ago. If that word is "inclusive," Frank could be the sole owner of the Dodgers. If that word is "exclusive," Jamie could be the co-owner. Three copies of the agreement say "inclusive. " Three copies say "exclusive. " Frank and Jamie have both said they were not aware of the different wording until this year.
SPORTS
September 21, 2010 | By Bill Shaikin and Carla Hall
An attorney acknowledged under oath Tuesday that he changed a key word in the contested property agreement between Frank and Jamie McCourt — after the parties had signed the agreement and without informing either one. In the most riveting trial testimony to date, Jamie McCourt's attorney relentlessly attacked the actions of Larry Silverstein, the Massachusetts lawyer responsible for substituting language that could decide whether the...
SPORTS
September 23, 2010 | By Carla Hall
Jamie McCourt has testified that she would never have signed away her right to a share in the Dodgers, but on Thursday a Boston lawyer flatly denied she ever told him that. "She never indicated that she wanted ownership interest in the Dodgers or that she was willing to take on the risk" financially, said Larry Silverstein, who drew up the controversial 2004 marital property agreement that makes the Dodgers Frank McCourt's sole property and the couple's many homes Jamie's. On Silverstein's third day on the stand in the McCourts' divorce trial, he insisted that he followed the wishes of Jamie McCourt, whom he called "the driving force" behind the property agreement.
SPORTS
September 21, 2010 | By Bill Shaikin and Carla Hall
An attorney acknowledged under oath Tuesday that he changed a key word in the contested property agreement between Frank and Jamie McCourt — after the parties had signed the agreement and without informing either one. In the most riveting trial testimony to date, Jamie McCourt's attorney relentlessly attacked the actions of Larry Silverstein, the Massachusetts lawyer responsible for substituting language that could decide whether the...
SPORTS
September 19, 2010 | By Bill Shaikin
The dispute over who owns the Dodgers may turn on one word. It is the 12th word of the second paragraph of the first exhibit of an agreement signed by Frank and Jamie McCourt six years ago. If that word is "inclusive," Frank could be the sole owner of the Dodgers. If that word is "exclusive," Jamie could be the co-owner. Three copies of the agreement say "inclusive. " Three copies say "exclusive. " Frank and Jamie have both said they were not aware of the different wording until this year.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
New York developer Larry Silverstein and the California State Teachers Retirement System paid $400 million for 575 Lexington Ave., a 35-story office tower in Midtown Manhattan. Silverstein, leaseholder on the World Trade Center office space, and CalSTRS, the second-largest U.S. pension fund, formed the partnership this year and the purchase is its first. Silverstein and CalSTRS said in a statement they would spend as much as $2 billion on commercial properties in the New York area.
NATIONAL
April 30, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
World Trade Center leaseholder Larry Silverstein suffered a court defeat that means he won't get his $3.5-billion insurance policy paid twice over. In a partial verdict, a federal jury found that the majority of the insurers, who hold more than $1 billion of the policy, are bound by a form that defined the Sept. 11 attacks as one event. It was the first of at least two trials that will ultimately decide how much insurance money will be available to rebuild ground zero.
BUSINESS
January 1, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Swiss Reinsurance Co. and 19 other insurers being sued by World Trade Center developer Larry Silverstein may use at trial a court ruling that the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the building complex were one occurrence, a judge ruled. Silverstein is suing the insurance companies, alleging that the two planes that hit the two towers constituted two attacks, and thus warrant two insurance payments of $3.55 billion each under the terms of his policies. The introduction of the Sept.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Seven insurers have agreed to pay an additional $2 billion to resolve all outstanding insurance claims from the Sept. 11, 2001, destruction of the World Trade Center, speeding redevelopment at ground zero, New York state officials said. The settlement ends more than five years of litigation between the insurers and Larry Silverstein, the site's developer. Officials consider the settlement the last major obstacle to redevelop ground zero.
NATIONAL
June 27, 2006 | From Times Wire Services
World Trade Center developer Larry Silverstein and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey sued insurers to demand that they pay up on the buildings destroyed in the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Some insurers have suggested they might not make payments owed for redevelopment because the original plan changed. Silverstein and the Port Authority, which owns the 16-acre site, say the money is essential to rebuilding.
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