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Larry Singleton

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NEWS
June 18, 1988 | Associated Press
Freed rapist Larry Singleton is not living in Tampa, his brother says, but word that Singleton gave authorities his brother's address here was enough to stir up a campaign to run him out of town. A total of $10,000 and a one-way ticket out of Florida were offered Thursday by a Bradenton car dealer and a St. Petersburg radio station if the 60-year-old former merchant seaman would pack up and leave.
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NEWS
October 4, 1988
A woman who allowed convicted rapist-maimer Larry Singleton to stay at her home in the Contra Costa County community of Pinole said recent publicity about his presence and resulting pressure from police have forced him to return to Florida. "It's all over now," said the woman, who talked to the Contra Costa Times on condition that her name not be used. "Larry's leaving. They've won." She indicated that she and Singleton had planned to remain together but that "he's leaving to protect me."
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NEWS
October 4, 1988
A woman who allowed convicted rapist-maimer Larry Singleton to stay at her home in the Contra Costa County community of Pinole said recent publicity about his presence and resulting pressure from police have forced him to return to Florida. "It's all over now," said the woman, who talked to the Contra Costa Times on condition that her name not be used. "Larry's leaving. They've won." She indicated that she and Singleton had planned to remain together but that "he's leaving to protect me."
NEWS
June 18, 1988 | Associated Press
Freed rapist Larry Singleton is not living in Tampa, his brother says, but word that Singleton gave authorities his brother's address here was enough to stir up a campaign to run him out of town. A total of $10,000 and a one-way ticket out of Florida were offered Thursday by a Bradenton car dealer and a St. Petersburg radio station if the 60-year-old former merchant seaman would pack up and leave.
NEWS
May 31, 1987 | DAN MORAIN and MARK STEIN, Times Staff Writers
Grim-faced, petition in hand, Danny Baronian, father of two young children, did his part to get parolee Larry Singleton, the man who raped and mutilated a 15-year-old girl, out of town. "I don't know where he should go. I just don't want him here," Baronian said last week as he urged each customer of the Lucky market on this town's main street to add his or her signature to the petition demanding that Singleton be placed anywhere but in this Contra Costa County city.
NEWS
May 20, 1987
The state Supreme Court rejected Contra Costa County's latest legal move to reject paroled mutilator-rapist Larry Singleton, despite hints of vigilante action and a vow by Mayor George Livingston of Richmond to "build a wall" around the convict to prevent him from settling there. A one-line order signed by Chief Justice Malcolm Lucas let stand a District Court of Appeal ruling that no community could bar Singleton. But Livingston was adamant.
NEWS
February 23, 1997 | PETER H. KING
They lived, and died, a continent apart--one on the Florida peninsula, the other in a Northern California village. One was a woman in trouble, a prostitute and unwed mother of three. The other was a precocious 12-year-old who began her last night of life giggling at a slumber party. Roxanne Hayes had little in common with Polly Klaas, with a few brutal exceptions. Both were murdered: Hayes last Wednesday in Tampa; Klaas four years ago in Petaluma.
NEWS
May 22, 1996 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a class of fifth-grade students attended a City Council meeting to watch how city fathers wrestle with the issues, they never expected to see a wrestling match. But that's what happened Monday when a speaker refused to stop talking. By the end, the mayor had bruised ribs, a councilman had broken eyeglasses, and a police officer had to use pepper spray on a 38-year-old construction worker before placing him under arrest for disturbing the peace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1990 | VINCENT SCHIRALDI, Vincent Schiraldi is director of the National Center on Institutions and Alternatives in San Francisco and a member of the Blue Ribbon Commission on Inmate Population Management.
Two big criminal-justice developments occurred during the last week of January. Charles Rothenberg, convicted of attempting to murder his son by setting him afire, was released from prison. California's Blue Ribbon Commission on Inmate Population Management, charged with devising ways to make the state's criminal-justice system saner, issued its report to the Legislature.
NEWS
May 28, 1987 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
Lawrence Singleton remained secluded in a secret location here Wednesday while city officials urged residents to call on the state to once again send the paroled rapist on his way. Mindful of the mob that on Monday forced authorities to evacuate Singleton from nearby Rodeo, officials suggested, however, that residents keep their protests to petitions and telephone calls. "We will take every legal step to see that he is not permanently placed here.
NEWS
May 31, 1987 | DAN MORAIN and MARK STEIN, Times Staff Writers
Grim-faced, petition in hand, Danny Baronian, father of two young children, did his part to get parolee Larry Singleton, the man who raped and mutilated a 15-year-old girl, out of town. "I don't know where he should go. I just don't want him here," Baronian said last week as he urged each customer of the Lucky market on this town's main street to add his or her signature to the petition demanding that Singleton be placed anywhere but in this Contra Costa County city.
NEWS
January 27, 1990 | From the Associated Press
A newspaper said that Charles Rothenberg, who severely disfigured his 6-year-old son by setting him on fire seven years ago, may be in the San Francisco Bay Area, but a state Department of Corrections spokesman refused to confirm or deny the the report. The report about Rothenberg came in today's editions of the San Francisco Chronicle. The newspaper said a law enforcement source said that Rothenberg will be or already has been taken to Oakland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1989 | JOHN BALZAR, Times Political Writer
Ambitious politicians and angry crime victims teamed up Thursday for the kickoff of what could be a noteworthy ballot initiative campaign to speed up criminal trials in California. Ridiculing a system that took three years to bring Night Stalker suspect Richard Ramirez to trial, the victims and their supporters stood in the courtyard of the main County Jail, within earshot of prisoners, and predicted that this far-reaching measure would cut delays of years into just weeks and shorten the agony of those who have endured a crime.
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