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Larry Stewart

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NEWS
March 1, 1997
Larry Stewart, 67, four-time Emmy winner and former president of the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. Stewart was the group's first president after its separation from the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences in 1977, and in 1995 won its Syd Cassyd Founders Award for distinguished service. He co-founded the academy's college intern program.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Larry Stewart, a millionaire who became known as Secret Santa for his habit of roaming the streets each December and anonymously handing money to people, died Friday. He was 58. Stewart died at St. Luke's Hospital of complications from esophageal cancer, said Jackson County Sheriff Tom Phillips, a longtime friend. Stewart, who gave away a total of $1.3 million over 26 years, gained international attention in November when he revealed himself as Secret Santa.
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SPORTS
July 10, 1991 | LARRY STEWART
This time, CBS didn't need to put in a call for "Rescue: 911." All the network needed to save the night Tuesday was a good, smooth All-Star telecast. And it got it. A year ago, CBS had to use an old "Rescue: 911" segment to help fill dead air time caused by a 50-minute rain delay at Chicago's Wrigley Field. Tuesday night, CBS had plenty of good baseball, no rain and a beautiful setting.
SPORTS
August 9, 2006 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
If you attend sporting events, then this has probably happened to you: A fan or a group of fans seated near you, usually after a few too many beers, is using foul language and generally misbehaving. You look for an usher to voice a complaint, and none can be found. The Cincinnati Bengals have hit on one possible solution. The team announced Tuesday the creation of a hot line number that fans can call on their cellphones to report bad behavior.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Larry Stewart, a millionaire who became known as Secret Santa for his habit of roaming the streets each December and anonymously handing money to people, died Friday. He was 58. Stewart died at St. Luke's Hospital of complications from esophageal cancer, said Jackson County Sheriff Tom Phillips, a longtime friend. Stewart, who gave away a total of $1.3 million over 26 years, gained international attention in November when he revealed himself as Secret Santa.
SPORTS
June 13, 1987
Tom Heinsohn is a major league announcer. Larry Stewart is a Little League columnist. ED MURPHY Los Angeles
SPORTS
June 20, 1987
Larry Stewart is a professional writer. Tom Heinsohn is a professional idiot. DAVID DANIEL Los Angeles
SPORTS
January 6, 1990
How could Larry Stewart omit Bob Miller and Nick Nickson? Their impartiality, clarity and enthusiasm make hockey broadcasts exciting. PAT MURPHY, Corona
SPORTS
September 19, 1998
In his column of Sept. 12, Larry Stewart was trying to get "Silver-Tipped" Stu Nahan a job. This is not the purpose of a TV/radio column. "Old Rip-and-Read" Stu should look for a job himself. Perhaps you should run the TV/radio column in the classified ads under "jobs wanted." I really believe Larry Stewart has lost it. PHILIP R. BLUSTEIN Beverly Hills
BUSINESS
June 10, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
A federal grand jury indicted a government ink expert accused of lying during his testimony in the Martha Stewart trial, his lawyer said. Larry F. Stewart, who was the chief forensic scientist for the U.S. Secret Service, was arrested last month. Manhattan federal prosecutors said Larry Stewart lied when he testified in February that he examined a document the government offered into evidence. Other Secret Service scientists, not Stewart, examined the document, prosecutors said.
SPORTS
November 16, 2005 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Tony Stewart goes into the final NASCAR Nextel Cup race of the season Sunday at Homestead-Miami Speedway with what appears to be a comfortable lead in the "Chase for the Championship." Stewart is 52 points ahead of Jimmie Johnson and 87 ahead of Carl Edwards. Writes Greg Cote of the Miami Herald, "Stewart's big lead means ninth place or better clinches the title -- and he has been top-10 in 19 of his past 21 starts.
SPORTS
July 7, 2005 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
In honor of the Fourth of July, SI.com named 25 "American Revolutionary Athletes" who changed sports. At the top of the list, in order, are Muhammad Ali, Jackie Robinson, Billie Jean King, Babe Ruth and Arthur Ashe. Larry Bird and Magic Johnson are an entry at No. 20. Oddly enough, Tonya Harding didn't make the list. Apparently, the folks at SI.
BUSINESS
October 6, 2004 | From Reuters
A U.S. Secret Service ink expert was found not guilty Tuesday of lying during his testimony at the trial of Martha Stewart. A federal jury in New York acquitted Larry Stewart on its second day of deliberations, finding him innocent of charges that he gave false testimony about tests conducted on an important piece of evidence used in Martha Stewart's case.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2004 | From Associated Press
The perjury case against a Secret Service ink expert who testified against Martha Stewart amounts to a sex-tinged grudge held against the witness by a woman who worked for him, a defense lawyer said Thursday. In opening statements in the trial of Larry Stewart, lawyer Judith Wheat said the woman, Susan Fortunato, was upset that prosecutors had chosen him, not her, to testify as an expert witness at the celebrity's trial.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2004 | From Reuters
A U.S. Secret Service employee accused of lying during testimony in the criminal trial of lifestyle entrepreneur Martha Stewart lost a bid Wednesday to have charges against him dismissed by a federal judge. Federal prosecutors allege that Larry Stewart, a Secret Service laboratory director, falsely testified during the closely watched trial about his involvement in testing ink on a worksheet kept by Martha Stewart's stockbroker.
BUSINESS
June 17, 2004 | From Associated Press
Secret Service ink expert Larry F. Stewart pleaded not guilty to charges that he lied on the witness stand while testifying for the government at the trial of Martha Stewart. A federal judge set a Sept. 20 trial date. Martha Stewart and former stockbroker Peter E. Bacanovic, who were convicted in March of lying about a stock sale, have asked for a new trial based on the charges against Larry Stewart, who is not related to the homemaking icon.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2004 | From Reuters
A U.S. Secret Service employee accused of lying during testimony in the criminal trial of lifestyle entrepreneur Martha Stewart lost a bid Wednesday to have charges against him dismissed by a federal judge. Federal prosecutors allege that Larry Stewart, a Secret Service laboratory director, falsely testified during the closely watched trial about his involvement in testing ink on a worksheet kept by Martha Stewart's stockbroker.
SPORTS
October 3, 1987
I just want to congratulate (Larry Stewart) on your article on Keith Olbermann. I've got to give (him) a 10. I've always been an ardent fan of Channel 5 news at 10 until this jerk came along. I watched him for a week and couldn't take any more. BOB KAHLE Los Angeles
BUSINESS
June 11, 2004 | Thomas S. Mulligan, Times Staff Writer
Martha Stewart asked for a new trial Thursday, saying her March 5 conviction was tainted by a witness' lies. Court papers filed by Stewart's lawyers contend that testimony by a Secret Service lab director who was indicted this week on perjury charges was "the capstone" of the government's effort to show that Stewart and her former stockbroker, Peter E. Bacanovic, lied to cover up the circumstances of her sale of stock in a biotechnology company.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
A federal grand jury indicted a government ink expert accused of lying during his testimony in the Martha Stewart trial, his lawyer said. Larry F. Stewart, who was the chief forensic scientist for the U.S. Secret Service, was arrested last month. Manhattan federal prosecutors said Larry Stewart lied when he testified in February that he examined a document the government offered into evidence. Other Secret Service scientists, not Stewart, examined the document, prosecutors said.
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