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Larry Totah

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2010
LARRY TOTAH L.A. architect and designer Larry Totah, 55, a Los Angeles architect and designer who created the look of retail boutiques, restaurants, furniture and home furnishings, died Sept. 3 at Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center. He had lymphoma, said close friend and family spokeswoman Andrea Kreuzhage. His projects included the minimalist Maxfield clothing boutique on Melrose Avenue in West Hollywood, the since-closed Noa Noa Polynesian-themed restaurant in Beverly Hills and hairstylist Vidal Sassoon's remodeled Beverly Hills home.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2010
LARRY TOTAH L.A. architect and designer Larry Totah, 55, a Los Angeles architect and designer who created the look of retail boutiques, restaurants, furniture and home furnishings, died Sept. 3 at Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center. He had lymphoma, said close friend and family spokeswoman Andrea Kreuzhage. His projects included the minimalist Maxfield clothing boutique on Melrose Avenue in West Hollywood, the since-closed Noa Noa Polynesian-themed restaurant in Beverly Hills and hairstylist Vidal Sassoon's remodeled Beverly Hills home.
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NEWS
January 7, 1990 | LEON WHITESON, Leon Whiteson writes regularly on design and architecture for the View section.
In designer Larry Totah's living room, the fireplace is flanked by a pair of red and orange "Humpty Dumpty" easy chairs that resemble sci-fi versions of Adirondack garden furniture. A copper coffee table on curly iron legs is guarded by padded crimson sofas, whose shapes mimic the mouth of the "M.A.S.H." character "Hot Lips" Houlihan. To set off these odd curves and colors, the floors of Totah's Hancock Park Craftsman home are plain waxed oak. Walls are finished in a somber gray.
MAGAZINE
January 13, 1991 | Barbara Thornburg
Artist Larry Totah, who achieved national attention for his trend-setting interiors for Melrose boutiques Maxfield and People and Beverly Hills restaurant Noa Noa, also designs furniture: sensuous, undulating forms that reject popular, hard-edge modernism. Totah's soft, rippling Ribbon breakfast table and bumpy Cake sofa introduce a more playful and romantic look. "I'm bored with the rigidity of furniture," Totah says.
NEWS
December 26, 1986 | BETTIJANE LEVINE
The young and the restless turned out in force when L.A. fashion designer Marina Spadafora and her husband, Sean Ferrer, tossed a Christmas ball for what they called "a few of our friends." Three-hundred fifty invitations went out, but 600 guests arrived for the midnight blast-off in Spadafora's Hollywood Boulevard design studio. The revelry lasted past 5 a.m.
MAGAZINE
January 13, 1991 | Barbara Thornburg
Artist Larry Totah, who achieved national attention for his trend-setting interiors for Melrose boutiques Maxfield and People and Beverly Hills restaurant Noa Noa, also designs furniture: sensuous, undulating forms that reject popular, hard-edge modernism. Totah's soft, rippling Ribbon breakfast table and bumpy Cake sofa introduce a more playful and romantic look. "I'm bored with the rigidity of furniture," Totah says.
MAGAZINE
March 18, 1990 | BARBARA THORNBURG
TODAY'S NEWEST FURNITURE ripples and rolls with soft, undulating profiles: wavy sofa backs, wiggly-legged tables and crescent-shaped chairs. It's a signal that the hard-edged minimalism that has reigned over interior design for the past three decades is tentatively giving way to curvilinear forms not seen since art nouveau flourished at the last turn-of-the-century. This new furniture is emerging worldwide, but Southern California designers are in the vanguard of the movement.
MAGAZINE
August 15, 1993 | AARON BETSKY
It's a bright Monday morning, and hair-cutting pioneer Vidal Sassoon is holding court at his Beverly Hills home, which designer Larry Totah has just finished remodeling. Since marrying Ronnie Holbrook, a former product designer, a year ago, Sassoon has abandoned his bachelor pad in Century City for something more spacious and relaxing. "I wanted a place to be at home," he says. "I've been here since Friday evening and haven't left since. I even have my meetings here."
MAGAZINE
October 16, 1988 | VIRGINIA GRAY
AFTER ALMOST a decade of understatement in interior design, metallic finishes are beginning to reappear. The most dramatic example of this is the new popularity of gold: gold leaf on serious, expensive furniture; gold paint on moderately priced pieces; gold trim on accessories, and gold threads and patterns woven into decorative textiles. Historically, gold has symbolized the measure of earthly wealth. In art, it was the color of divinity, a synonym for light and salvation.
MAGAZINE
November 4, 1990 | BARBARA THORNBURG
Mosaic. The word conjurs up ancient tableaus: Pompeian murals, Roman baths, domed Byzantine ceilings. In the 20th century the Art Nouveau architect, Antonio Gaudi, covered the undulating facade of Casa Battllo with polychrome tile and adorned the gothic spires of his most famous masterpiece, The Church of the Sagrada Familia with a dazzling display of mirror and glass.
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | LEON WHITESON, Leon Whiteson writes regularly on design and architecture for the View section.
In designer Larry Totah's living room, the fireplace is flanked by a pair of red and orange "Humpty Dumpty" easy chairs that resemble sci-fi versions of Adirondack garden furniture. A copper coffee table on curly iron legs is guarded by padded crimson sofas, whose shapes mimic the mouth of the "M.A.S.H." character "Hot Lips" Houlihan. To set off these odd curves and colors, the floors of Totah's Hancock Park Craftsman home are plain waxed oak. Walls are finished in a somber gray.
NEWS
December 26, 1986 | BETTIJANE LEVINE
The young and the restless turned out in force when L.A. fashion designer Marina Spadafora and her husband, Sean Ferrer, tossed a Christmas ball for what they called "a few of our friends." Three-hundred fifty invitations went out, but 600 guests arrived for the midnight blast-off in Spadafora's Hollywood Boulevard design studio. The revelry lasted past 5 a.m.
NEWS
August 7, 1992 | WILLIAM KISSEL
It doesn't anchor a mall. And there are no full-page newspaper ads announcing one-day sales and personal appearances by designers. So how does George Foon, a boyish 26-year-old Chinese-Hawaiian-Korean entrepreneur from South-Central Los Angeles, have the nerve to call his tiny Melrose shop George's Department Store? "When I was a kid my mother used to take me to this great place called the Surprise Store in Culver City," says Foon.
MAGAZINE
October 23, 1988 | VIRGINIA GRAY, Virginia Gray is an associate editor of Los Angeles Times Magazine.
DECISIONS, DECISIONS. Furnishing a home calls for perhaps hundreds of them. But when sofas can cost as much as some cars (and often do), operating without a comprehensive design plan is pure folly. First things first: Decide on a style. Starkly modern or Bloomsbury chic? Nouvelle Southwest or Retro-Wright? Completing a home may take years, but choosing a style and sticking with classic designs will keep early purchases from going out of fashion.
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