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Larry V Locke

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BUSINESS
November 25, 1990 | JIM SCHACHTER
For all that Bernard Mass may have done to Whiteworth, so far it is only the two Texans who gave him control of the company who have been held accountable for Whiteworth's woes. Don M. Sweatman and Larry V. Locke chose not to defend themselves against a civil complaint filed in April by the U.S. Labor Department accusing them of violating federal pension laws by raiding Whiteworth's pension plan in March, 1987, a few months after they took over the firm. In the lawsuit, filed in U.S.
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BUSINESS
November 25, 1990 | JIM SCHACHTER
For all that Bernard Mass may have done to Whiteworth, so far it is only the two Texans who gave him control of the company who have been held accountable for Whiteworth's woes. Don M. Sweatman and Larry V. Locke chose not to defend themselves against a civil complaint filed in April by the U.S. Labor Department accusing them of violating federal pension laws by raiding Whiteworth's pension plan in March, 1987, a few months after they took over the firm. In the lawsuit, filed in U.S.
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BUSINESS
December 4, 1986 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
A Texas investment group said Wednesday that it purchased a 33% interest in Applied Circuit Technology Inc. of Anaheim and is taking over management of the ailing maker of electronics equipment and generic drugs. Locke-Sweatman Investments of Austin, Tex., said it bought 4 million shares of ACT held by its founder, chairman and chief executive, J.V. Taylor, for between $3 million and $5.5 million.
BUSINESS
November 25, 1990 | JIM SCHACHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's a certain kind of business known as a schlock operation. Its merchandise is schlock-- Yiddish for "knocked about," second-rate, fire-sale stuff. But the term also suggests a way of doing business, regardless of the merchant's ethnicity. The standard operating procedures are seat-of-the-pants. Ethics are checked at the door. Such operations and operators are staples of commerce, moving goods no one else will sell and serving a clientele that big business ignores.
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