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Larry Volk

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1998 | CLAIRE VITUCCI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaning close, the small boy slowly ran his fingers over the thick tubes of white paint that meandered across the canvas on the wall. He smiled. It marked the first moment that Alex Rivas, a 14-year-old Lynwood boy, was able to "see" art. Usually, when he and others who are blind visit an art gallery, they must rely on a sighted person to tell them what a painting, sketch or sculpture looks like. But Larry Volk, a 39-year-old artist from Van Nuys, may have changed that.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1998 | CLAIRE VITUCCI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaning close, the small boy slowly ran his fingers over the thick tubes of white paint that meandered across the canvas on the wall. He smiled. It marked the first moment that Alex Rivas, a 14-year-old Lynwood boy, was able to "see" art. Usually, when he and others who are blind visit an art gallery, they must rely on a sighted person to tell them what a painting, sketch or sculpture looks like. But Larry Volk, a 39-year-old artist from Van Nuys, may have changed that.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1998 | CLAIRE VITUCCI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaning close, the small boy slowly ran his fingers over the thick tubes of white paint that meandered across the canvas on the wall. He smiled. It marked the first moment that 14-year-old Alex Rivas of Lynwood was able to "see" art. Usually when he and others who are blind visit an art gallery, they must rely on a sighted person to tell them what a painting, sketch or sculpture looks like. But Larry Volk, a 39-year-old artist from Van Nuys, may have changed that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1998 | CLAIRE VITUCCI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaning close, the small boy slowly ran his fingers over the thick tubes of white paint that meandered across the canvas on the wall. He smiled. It marked the first moment that 14-year-old Alex Rivas of Lynwood was able to "see" art. Usually when he and others who are blind visit an art gallery, they must rely on a sighted person to tell them what a painting, sketch or sculpture looks like. But Larry Volk, a 39-year-old artist from Van Nuys, may have changed that.
SPORTS
August 2, 1987 | THOMAS BONK, Times Staff Writer
When it was played last summer, it was magic all right, but what else was it? "Spectacular," said Magic Johnson. And just one year later, the second Magic Johnson All-Star benefit basketball game tonight at the Forum has already grown into something more. So it has come to this, has it? A Midsummer Night's Magic . This is what it's called now, and while it may not exactly be Shakespeare, who cares? This is not Hamlet, this is Dunk It.
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