Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLarynxes
IN THE NEWS

Larynxes

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
UCLA researchers have capped a 30-year quest by successfully transplanting larynxes in dogs, a major step, they say, toward accomplishing the procedure in humans. The technique has eluded researchers for so long because of their inability to achieve a functioning larynx by reactivating nerve endings that connect the larynx, or voice box, to the brain stem. Dr.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2013 | Ari Bloomekatz, Los Angeles Times
Debi Austin looked into the camera, swallowed - the hole in her throat as big as a half-dollar coin and as black as nothingness - and said she had her first cigarette when she was 13, that she had tried to quit but couldn't. And that "they" say nicotine is not addictive. Then she picked up a half-burned, still-lit cigarette from an ashtray, titled back her head and took a drag from the hole in her neck. She winced, and as the smoke wafted out of the hole she said: "How can they say that?"
Advertisement
NEWS
May 18, 1990 | From United Press International
Surgeons removed the voice box of former hostage Robert Polhill on Thursday in what doctors called a successful operation to rid his body of cancer. "He's in intensive care after undergoing surgery," Walter Reed Army Medical Center spokesman Ben Smith said. "His condition's good. Smith quoted doctors as saying the cancer had not spread beyond Polhill's larynx, or voice box. Polhill, 55, was freed April 22 after more than three years in captivity in Lebanon. Army Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2002 | ANNA GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dog-mauling victim Diane Whipple was killed in the same way a lion pounces on its prey, suffering bruises and cuts everywhere except for the soles of her feet and the top of her head, a chief medical examiner testified Monday. The most severe wounds were to Whipple's neck, where her jugular vein was severed and her larynx was punctured, Dr. Boyd Stephens told jurors in Los Angeles County Superior Court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1995
A complex surgical operation on an Italian woman who wanted to repair her damaged voice to allow her to speak normally again went smoothly Friday, said the woman's surgeon at UCI Medical Center. "She's doing great," said Adriana Cioce's surgeon, Dr. Roger L. Crumley. Cioce, 42, a tour guide in Rome, arrived here last week. She was scheduled for surgery Tuesday but doctors had postponed the operation after she developed a heart irregularity.
NEWS
January 10, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A man who lost his voice in a motorcycle accident 19 years ago rasped "Hello" and "Hi, Mom" just a few days after what is believed to be the first larynx transplant since 1969. Timothy Heidler, 40, could be speaking in a normal voice in five months or less, doctors at the Cleveland Clinic said. In a 12-hour surgery on Sunday, Heidler received the larynx, part of the trachea and 70% of the throat of an unidentified donor.
SPORTS
July 27, 1993 | THERESA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mike Lee of Simi Valley suffered a fractured larynx when he was hit in the throat with the ball Saturday night in a U.S. Olympic Festival field hockey game. Lee's injury is similar to the one incurred by The Masters' College basketball player Phil Sanson, but it not as severe. Lee, 28, does not have respiratory problems and his ability to speak is improving. He was released from the intensive-care unit of Baptist Hospital Monday and referred to UCLA specialist Thomas Calcaterra.
NEWS
October 9, 1992 | MICHAEL ARKUSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jerry Robertson lost his voice three years ago when he got cancer. "Every morning I wake up, I'm madder than hell," said Robertson, who had his larynx removed and communicates with a mechanical device that makes him sound like a robot. Robertson, 48, of Van Nuys could have surrendered to the handicap and become a hermit. But instead, he chose to speak to high school and elementary classes about the dangers of smoking--the primary cause of larynx cancer.
SPORTS
January 31, 2000 | From Associated Press
Trent McCleary, who came within minutes of dying after being hit in the throat by a slap shot, felt well enough Sunday to write a note to his Montreal Canadien teammates. "Doing great, everybody," said the handwritten message delivered by team doctor David Mulder. He said he would be listening to Sunday's game, in which Montreal defeated Carolina, 3-0. "Battle hard," the note said. "Go Habs." It was signed, "Trent No. 6."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 2001 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Her voice was quiet. But even the most boisterous students in the Locke High School auditorium fell silent to hear Pauline Owens. "You are about to learn an important lesson," she began. It was a 25th anniversary commemoration of the Great American Smokeout, sponsored by the American Cancer Society. Owens, whose larynx was removed due to complications of her smoking habit, was speaking with the aid of a little machine known as a voice box.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 2001 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Her voice was quiet. But even the most boisterous students in the Locke High School auditorium fell silent to hear Pauline Owens. "You are about to learn an important lesson," she began. It was a 25th anniversary commemoration of the Great American Smokeout, sponsored by the American Cancer Society. Owens, whose larynx was removed due to complications of her smoking habit, was speaking with the aid of a little machine known as a voice box.
SPORTS
January 31, 2000 | From Associated Press
Trent McCleary, who came within minutes of dying after being hit in the throat by a slap shot, felt well enough Sunday to write a note to his Montreal Canadien teammates. "Doing great, everybody," said the handwritten message delivered by team doctor David Mulder. He said he would be listening to Sunday's game, in which Montreal defeated Carolina, 3-0. "Battle hard," the note said. "Go Habs." It was signed, "Trent No. 6."
NEWS
January 10, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A man who lost his voice in a motorcycle accident 19 years ago rasped "Hello" and "Hi, Mom" just a few days after what is believed to be the first larynx transplant since 1969. Timothy Heidler, 40, could be speaking in a normal voice in five months or less, doctors at the Cleveland Clinic said. In a 12-hour surgery on Sunday, Heidler received the larynx, part of the trachea and 70% of the throat of an unidentified donor.
NEWS
October 16, 1996 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Phase One: Cigar smoking is something Grandpa does at Friday night poker games. Phase Two: The pastime gets bigger and hipper. Trendy types are lighting up at fund-raisers and night clubs. Suddenly, stogies are everywhere. Demi Moore posed with one for the cover of Cigar Aficionado magazine. (Some of the magazine's subscribers recently paid $450 for a "Big Smoke" Las Vegas weekend.) And recently, it was even possible to catch a cigar party at the gym.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1995
A complex surgical operation on an Italian woman who wanted to repair her damaged voice to allow her to speak normally again went smoothly Friday, said the woman's surgeon at UCI Medical Center. "She's doing great," said Adriana Cioce's surgeon, Dr. Roger L. Crumley. Cioce, 42, a tour guide in Rome, arrived here last week. She was scheduled for surgery Tuesday but doctors had postponed the operation after she developed a heart irregularity.
SPORTS
July 27, 1993 | THERESA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mike Lee of Simi Valley suffered a fractured larynx when he was hit in the throat with the ball Saturday night in a U.S. Olympic Festival field hockey game. Lee's injury is similar to the one incurred by The Masters' College basketball player Phil Sanson, but it not as severe. Lee, 28, does not have respiratory problems and his ability to speak is improving. He was released from the intensive-care unit of Baptist Hospital Monday and referred to UCLA specialist Thomas Calcaterra.
SPORTS
January 13, 1993 | THERESA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Phil Sanson, The Master's College basketball player who suffered a crushed larynx during a game Saturday, might not speak again or be able to breathe without a tube in his throat, his surgeon said from San Francisco on Tuesday. Sanson, a 6-foot-7 senior forward, was injured against Dominican College in San Rafael, Calif., when he dived into the bleachers after a loose ball. Dr.
NEWS
October 16, 1996 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Phase One: Cigar smoking is something Grandpa does at Friday night poker games. Phase Two: The pastime gets bigger and hipper. Trendy types are lighting up at fund-raisers and night clubs. Suddenly, stogies are everywhere. Demi Moore posed with one for the cover of Cigar Aficionado magazine. (Some of the magazine's subscribers recently paid $450 for a "Big Smoke" Las Vegas weekend.) And recently, it was even possible to catch a cigar party at the gym.
SPORTS
January 13, 1993 | THERESA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Phil Sanson, The Master's College basketball player who suffered a crushed larynx during a game Saturday, might not speak again or be able to breathe without a tube in his throat, his surgeon said from San Francisco on Tuesday. Sanson, a 6-foot-7 senior forward, was injured against Dominican College in San Rafael, Calif., when he dived into the bleachers after a loose ball. Dr.
NEWS
October 9, 1992 | MICHAEL ARKUSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jerry Robertson lost his voice three years ago when he got cancer. "Every morning I wake up, I'm madder than hell," said Robertson, who had his larynx removed and communicates with a mechanical device that makes him sound like a robot. Robertson, 48, of Van Nuys could have surrendered to the handicap and become a hermit. But instead, he chose to speak to high school and elementary classes about the dangers of smoking--the primary cause of larynx cancer.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|