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Las Flores Canyon

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NEWS
May 21, 1995 | JANICE ARKATOV, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It has been said that one person's garbage is another person's art. In the case of Heather McKay, it's certainly true. Except that McKay's art is her garbage--more specifically, the remains of her Malibu home, which was destroyed in the 1993 fires that swept through Las Flores Canyon. A few weeks after the fire, McKay invited artist Ariel Heart to see her once-beautiful home, now reduced to a sickening pile of twisted metal and rubble.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2009 | Veronique de Turenne
When Cheronda Guyton, a senior vice president with Wells Fargo, used a foreclosed home to host lavish parties last summer in the Malibu Colony, she broke more than a few company rules. But by caving to her craving for the beach life, the now-fired bank executive joined a long line of people aching to lay claim to that fabled stretch of sand. Located in the heart of Malibu just north of Surfrider Beach, the famed Malibu Colony is a half-mile stretch of 100 or so homes that sit inches apart on the shoreline.
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NEWS
June 25, 1987 | JUDY PASTERNAK, Times Staff Writer
Consultants for Los Angeles County are recommending an $11-million project to repair road damage caused by landslides in the Las Flores Canyon area of Malibu. The proposal is designed to reopen one main road, Rambla Pacifico, closed since 1984, and to protect another, Las Flores Canyon Road, from destruction. The owners of about 400 affected homes would be expected to bear much of the cost.
HOME & GARDEN
September 12, 2009 | Barbara Thornburg
It's a 2 1/2 -mile ride up a sinuous Malibu canyon to the 700-square-foot weekend home of architects Cory Buckner and Nick Roberts. There, deer graze on the hillside covered with sumac, scrub and a scattering of oaks; occasionally, a bevy of quail scurries over the dirt yard in front of their dining room window. Come night, coyotes make their plaintiff cries under a sky filled with more stars than you can count. But it's the spectacular view from the couple's aerie -- nestled into the rugged hillside descending into a blur of blue Pacific waters -- that makes you catch your breath.
NEWS
April 10, 1994 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Malibu and Los Angeles County have jointly applied for $11 million in state and federal funding for projects to avert disastrous flooding and landslides that have plagued Las Flores Canyon for decades. The projects would include building a system of storm drains and catch basins in the canyon to alleviate problems caused by rainstorms. Malibu officials say the city qualifies for the funding because of the November wildfires, which exacerbated flooding and slide problems in the canyon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1994 | RON RUSSELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the Malibu canyon where Paul Mantee's house burned to the ground last November, wildflowers have poked through the topsoil, lending a splash of color to the charred landscape. "This is where I want to be," said Mantee, a novelist and actor who is embroiled in a struggle to rebuild after losing everything in the fire. But he fears that Malibu may try to take his property as a possible buffer against future disasters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1995
Malibu will not be getting much-needed help from the Federal Emergency Management Agency for its landslide problem. The agency announced last week that it would not pay for damage caused by a landslide during a natural disaster, such as a flood, if the landslide already existed--even if the natural disaster made the landslide worse. Malibu had applied for $12 million in FEMA money to secure, stabilize and rebuild the mountains in Malibu's Las Flores Canyon.
NEWS
July 28, 1994 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER
The Federal Emergency Management Agency and the State Office of Emergency Services have approved the city of Malibu's request for just over $8 million to mitigate flooding and landslides in Las Flores Canyon and to reopen Rambla Pacifico. The city qualified for the funds because of the November brush fires, which exacerbated existing problems and created long-term hazards to residents. The total project cost is estimated at $11 million, with Malibu's share being roughly $700,000.
NEWS
February 18, 1990
Millard Canyon, which borders the proposed La Vina housing project area in Altadena, once contained a showplace home called "Boulder Crest." Built in 1910 by Reinhardt J. Busch, the three-story, Swiss-style lodge boasted electric lights, hot and cold running water, marble shower stalls, hardwood parquet floors, an adjacent garden and a fish pond covered by a thatched roof.
NEWS
February 21, 1991
Two homeowner groups squared off at Tuesday's meeting of Malibu's City Council-elect over a county plan to destroy 11 homes and reroute Las Flores Creek in order to open Rambla Pacifico Road, closed by a landslide since 1984. Describing the county's plan as a "meat-cleaver approach," Susan Shaw, president of the Las Flores Canyon Residents Assn., called instead for a solution that did not destroy the homes or the creek.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1998
A five-mile section of Pacific Coast Highway that had been closed for more than a week because of landslides reopened Thursday afternoon--just in time for the Fourth of July weekend. Only one lane in each direction was reopened, however, and the maximum allowable speed will be just 30 mph. In other words, if there's another route to your holiday destination, take it. A June 19 slide brought down dirt and rocks onto the highway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1995
Malibu will not be getting much-needed help from the Federal Emergency Management Agency for its landslide problem. The agency announced last week that it would not pay for damage caused by a landslide during a natural disaster, such as a flood, if the landslide already existed--even if the natural disaster made the landslide worse. Malibu had applied for $12 million in FEMA money to secure, stabilize and rebuild the mountains in Malibu's Las Flores Canyon.
NEWS
May 21, 1995 | JANICE ARKATOV, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It has been said that one person's garbage is another person's art. In the case of Heather McKay, it's certainly true. Except that McKay's art is her garbage--more specifically, the remains of her Malibu home, which was destroyed in the 1993 fires that swept through Las Flores Canyon. A few weeks after the fire, McKay invited artist Ariel Heart to see her once-beautiful home, now reduced to a sickening pile of twisted metal and rubble.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1995
Southern California was handed its latest dose of natural disaster on Tuesday, with record amounts of rain falling across the region. Here is a look at the problems and a glance at what's ahead. More Misery in Malibu Much of Southern California was swamped on Tuesday. But for Malibu, the flooding was just the latest in a long line of calamities caused by the elements--the most recent being the raging wildfires of 1993.
NEWS
July 28, 1994 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER
The Federal Emergency Management Agency and the State Office of Emergency Services have approved the city of Malibu's request for just over $8 million to mitigate flooding and landslides in Las Flores Canyon and to reopen Rambla Pacifico. The city qualified for the funds because of the November brush fires, which exacerbated existing problems and created long-term hazards to residents. The total project cost is estimated at $11 million, with Malibu's share being roughly $700,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1994 | RON RUSSELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the Malibu canyon where Paul Mantee's house burned to the ground last November, wildflowers have poked through the topsoil, lending a splash of color to the charred landscape. "This is where I want to be," said Mantee, a novelist and actor who is embroiled in a struggle to rebuild after losing everything in the fire. But he fears that Malibu may try to take his property as a possible buffer against future disasters.
NEWS
December 2, 1993 | G. JEANETTE AVENT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Scavengers sifting through ashes for melted gold and silver, and carloads of sightseers gawking at the blackened hillsides have prompted sheriff's deputies to seek a ban on all but residents and authorized traffic entering some of Malibu's fire-scorched areas. Malibu City Manager David Carmany said Tuesday that he and the city attorney are drafting an emergency ordinance that will restrict traffic in some of the burned areas, particularly Las Flores Canyon.
NEWS
January 6, 1994 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The fires of November were simply the latest natural disaster to befall Las Flores Canyon. Every time it rains heavily, there's flooding. The area is also landslide-prone, and the Malibu earthquake fault is close by. And so it has occurred to some Malibu city officials that maybe, just maybe, people should not be living there.
NEWS
April 10, 1994 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Malibu and Los Angeles County have jointly applied for $11 million in state and federal funding for projects to avert disastrous flooding and landslides that have plagued Las Flores Canyon for decades. The projects would include building a system of storm drains and catch basins in the canyon to alleviate problems caused by rainstorms. Malibu officials say the city qualifies for the funding because of the November wildfires, which exacerbated flooding and slide problems in the canyon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1994 | RON RUSSELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Name a year and they can name a disaster. There was the 1970 wildfire. The 1984 mudslides. The 1992 flood. And, worst of all, last fall's firestorm. For decades, residents of Malibu's Las Flores Canyon have managed to overcome what nature dished out. They built retaining walls in the face of floods, planted vegetation to ward off landslides, cleared brush and installed sprinkler systems to protect their houses against fire.
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