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BUSINESS
November 15, 1991 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Circus Circus Enterprises on Thursday unveiled plans for a $270-million, 2,500-room hotel and casino on the Las Vegas Strip--the third major resort announced for the city in the last month. The still-unnamed hotel--the third and most upscale of Circus Circus' Las Vegas properties--will be in the form of a 30-story pyramid sheathed in bronze reflective glass. It will be located on a 47-acre parcel next to Circus Circus' 4,000-room Excalibur.
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BUSINESS
October 22, 2001 | ANGIE WAGNER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The city's casino king is at it again. A year and a half after Steve Wynn left the gambling business, he announced last week that he will open Le Reve, a resort he predicts will be unlike any other on the Las Vegas Strip. "People are going to come from everywhere to see it and marvel at it," Wynn said Friday in a speech during the 15th annual World Gaming Congress & Expo at the Venetian hotel-casino. Le Reve means "the dream" in French and is the name of a Pablo Picasso painting Wynn owns.
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BUSINESS
January 9, 1994 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dorothy is still off to see the Wizard, but this time the Yellow Brick Road passes row upon row of clanking slot machines. Like Munchkins, a gaggle of children surround the pony-tailed actress posing as Dorothy inside the new MGM Grand Hotel casino. Grown-ups snap pictures of the kids and their newfound Land of Oz friends.
NEWS
March 18, 2001 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For all of the architectural antics that have held this town up to both acclaim and derision, the most head-spinning proposal of all is now being floated here. Las Vegas wants to build itself a real downtown. Better known for the Strip's half-size Eiffel Tower, its pyramid, Venetian canals, volcano and Roman statuary, Las Vegas now covets urban legitimacy.
MAGAZINE
December 12, 1993 | Tom Gorman, Tom Gorman is a Times staff writer. His last article for this magazine was about the preservation of natural resources at Camp Pendleton.
Skeptics snickered when Stephen Wynn announced plans in 1986 to build a $670-million hotel-casino in Las Vegas. Not only would it be the priciest resort on the Strip--and require a cash flow of more than $1 million a day just to break even--but he also had the nerve to plan a gambling joint where you wouldn't even see any slot machines when you walked through the front door.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1996 | From Reuters
MGM Grand Inc., owner of the $1-billion MGM Grand hotel and casino in Las Vegas, on Monday unveiled a $250-million plan to transform the Emerald City-themed hotel into a "City of Entertainment." The four-phase program will add stores and entertainment venues, a convention center, parking and redesign the lion's-head entry along Las Vegas' famed Strip.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1993 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As contractors topped off the world's largest casino complex on the Las Vegas Strip last month, gaming stocks on Wall Street tumbled down. Shares in the gambling business fell about 25% earlier this year, after soaring in 1992. MGM Grand saw its stock fall 23% in the few weeks before topping off its 30-story Las Vegas hotel and casino in February.
NEWS
October 2, 1989
Discovery of 45 dead desert tortoises on a 288-acre parcel north of Las Vegas is a strong indication that tortoises in Southern Nevada are being felled by the respiratory disease that led to their emergency designation as an endangered species, a biologist said. The finding could be significant because local officials and developers in the booming Las Vegas area have opposed such designation of the tortoise, based on the claim that there is no scientific evidence the disease exists in the area.
MAGAZINE
December 12, 1993 | BARBARA THORNBURG
Anyone unlucky enough to lose the shirt off his back need not worry. Staying at a Las Vegas hotel-casino means striking it rich: Gift shops stock a multicolored array of T-shirts emblazoned with hotel names and themes. "T-shirts are our single best-selling item," says Donald Kauffeld, apparel buyer at Luxor. "We sell approximately 10,000 of them a month." For $12 to $18, guests can show the world where they've been. Volcanoes and swaying palms say the Mirage.
NEWS
February 2, 2001 | GARY POLAKOVIC and TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Any given day, the view across this desert valley--the fastest growing metropolitan area in the nation--shows a carpet of homes stretching to the foothills, sprawling beneath not blue skies but a yellowish-tan haze. Distracted by the demands of an expanding population--new roads, new water lines and new schools--government officials here have failed to keep up with one of the most toxic side effects of growth: air pollution.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2001 | Diane Wedner
A group of California developers announced plans to build an Asian-themed hotel-casino on 10 acres along the west side of Las Vegas Boulevard, just south of the Strip in Las Vegas. Plans for the Dynasty Forbidden City resort call for a four-story hotel tower with a U-shaped parking garage wrapped around it in a design meant to resemble the Great Wall of China.
NEWS
August 9, 2000 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing a threat from Indian casinos in California, developers are preparing to wager staggering sums--and try out some increasingly weird ideas--on the next generation of desert gambling palaces. The reincarnated Aladdin resort, a $1.4-billion casino, hotel and shopping complex opening next week, will be the last major casino resort built on the Strip for at least three years. But after that, it seems, just about anything could happen.
NEWS
November 30, 1999 | NANCY CLEELAND and LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
No one can say Lilia Guzman didn't give Los Angeles an honest try. But after 15 years of going nowhere in South-Central, the weary garment worker from Acapulco was ready for a fresh start. In 1994, she packed up her husband and four kids and headed east. Guzman followed her dream to the land of quickie weddings and Elvis impersonators, a place where possibilities seemed as vast as the desert horizon and taking risks was as natural as breathing.
NEWS
February 3, 1999 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like clean government in Chicago, healthy air in Los Angeles and sizzling night life in Salt Lake City, a list of urban oxymorons might be topped by "historic preservation in Las Vegas." The city's great gambling monuments seem to come crashing down nearly as often as Don Rickles comes to town. Structures that predate 1950 cling to life like a trailer park in a tornado. Yet, in the capital of flash and cash, a determined few are struggling to save some remnants of Las Vegas' past.
NEWS
July 27, 1998 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a time when high-rolling Asian baccarat players are staying home and U.S. tourists are having more trouble getting here, this city is poised to roll out four new luxury mega-resorts for gamblers just like them, adding more than 12,000 rooms in a city whose economy has gone flat. Construction cranes arch high over the Strip, as Sin City strains toward tastefulness.
BUSINESS
October 11, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
New Gambling Sites: Hilton Hotels Corp. has applied for a license to operate a riverboat casino in New Orleans, one of several U.S. cities to legalize gambling. The riverboat would accommodate 2,500 people. In another development, Circus Circus, which opened the Excalibur hotel-casino a year ago, said it will build another large resort in Las Vegas. Groundbreaking ceremonies were held in Las Vegas this week for another casino, the $1-billion MGM Grand Hotel and Theme Park.
NEWS
November 30, 1999 | NANCY CLEELAND and LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
No one can say Lilia Guzman didn't give Los Angeles an honest try. But after 15 years of going nowhere in South-Central, the weary garment worker from Acapulco was ready for a fresh start. In 1994, she packed up her husband and four kids and headed east. Guzman followed her dream to the land of quickie weddings and Elvis impersonators, a place where possibilities seemed as vast as the desert horizon and taking risks was as natural as breathing.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1997 | From Associated Press
A California investment company plans to build an amusement park and 300-room nongaming hotel behind the Stratosphere hotel-casino. Emerald Isle of Southern California has already acquired about half of the 70 acres it needs for the venture. In comparison, Disneyland is 85 acres. Emerald Isle agreed to buy Stupak Park from the city for $4.5 million--six times the $750,000 estimated value--at Monday's city Real Estate Commission meeting.
NEWS
December 31, 1996 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Julie Brinkerhoff-Jacobs visits Las Vegas regularly, and each time she does, she hits most of the hotel-casinos in town. But Brinkerhoff-Jacobs isn't a gambler. She goes to Vegas to do research, marketing and project administration for Lifescapes International, a Newport Beach landscape architecture firm that is bringing home big bucks by helping design the desert playground.
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