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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1992 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The long and tortured tale of the Malibu Terrace housing project continues--the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors has ordered the developers to scale back their plan because it would harm a sensitive ecological area in the hills near Calabasas.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1992 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The long and tortured tale of the Malibu Terrace housing project continues--the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors has ordered the developers to scale back their plan because it would harm a sensitive ecological area in the hills near Calabasas.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1991 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite objections from Las Virgenes-area residents and environmental groups, the Los Angeles County Regional Planning Commission on Wednesday gave preliminary approval to a controversial housing development on nearly 500 acres of hilly, oak-studded land designated as an ecological preserve. Approval of the Malibu Terrace project on 494 acres west of Las Virgenes Road near Calabasas came after more than three hours of testimony against the project and was counter to staff recommendations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1992 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To many in the Las Virgenes area, the Malibu Terrace housing project represents everything wrong with Los Angeles County's planning process. Proposed on the site of an ecological preserve, vigorously opposed by area residents and three times larger than what the county's General Plan allows, the 341-home project nonetheless was approved without discussion last year by the Regional Planning Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1992 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To many in the Las Virgenes area, the Malibu Terrace housing project represents everything wrong with Los Angeles County's planning process. Proposed on the site of an ecological preserve, vigorously opposed by area residents and three times larger than what the county's General Plan allows, the 341-home project nonetheless was approved without discussion last year by the Regional Planning Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1991
Over objections from Las Virgenes area residents and environmental groups, the Los Angeles County Regional Planning Commission on Wednesday gave preliminary approval to a housing development on nearly 500 acres of hilly, oak-studded land designated as an ecological preserve. Approval of the Malibu Terrace project west of Las Virgenes Road near Calabasas was also counter to staff recommendations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1994
Capping eight years of debate, Los Angeles County supervisors have approved a housing project near Calabasas at a fraction of its original size, and given up on a plan to extend an unpopular four-lane highway through the property. The board granted the developer of the Malibu Terrace project permission to build a 4.5-acre commercial project and 110 houses in the sensitive ecological area along Las Virgenes Road north of the Ventura Freeway--less than a tenth of the 1,816 houses proposed in 1986.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1993 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the most contentious development proposals in the Las Virgenes area was approved Wednesday by a Los Angeles County planning board after the panel suddenly axed the project's most unpopular aspect--extension of a four-lane highway to the edge of a national park. The abrupt decision by the Regional Planning Commission surprised and heartened not only opponents of the Malibu Terrace project, but the developer as well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1990 | GABE FUENTES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County planning commissioners voted unanimously Wednesday against a controversial proposal for a large housing development and road extension in Calabasas, dealing the project a major setback. The county's Department of Public Works has sought to require the project's developer to build a costly one-mile extension of Thousand Oaks Boulevard to the edge of a national park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1989 | GABE FUENTES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A development project that would include a controversial road extension and threaten federal parkland in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area has environmentalists gearing up for a battle. A Sunnyvale developer's proposal to build more than 16 times the number of housing units allowed in the county's general plan, on land just east of the national park, would require Thousand Oaks Boulevard to be extended to the boundary of the park's Cheeseboro Canyon property in Agoura.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1991 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite objections from Las Virgenes-area residents and environmental groups, the Los Angeles County Regional Planning Commission on Wednesday gave preliminary approval to a controversial housing development on nearly 500 acres of hilly, oak-studded land designated as an ecological preserve. Approval of the Malibu Terrace project on 494 acres west of Las Virgenes Road near Calabasas came after more than three hours of testimony against the project and was counter to staff recommendations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1990 | GABE FUENTES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County planners are recommending rejection of a controversial development proposal linked to the extension of Thousand Oaks Boulevard to the edge of a national park. The county's Regional Planning Commission is scheduled today to hold its first public hearing on the proposal, known as Malibu Terrace. The project, which would be built on 494 vacant acres west of Las Virgenes Road in Calabasas, would include 1,700 apartments, 116 houses and 60,000 square feet of commercial space.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1990 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chief administrator of the government agency that oversees creation of new cities recommended Monday that Calabasas be allowed to incorporate, giving a major boost to those who back cityhood for the affluent community. The report to the Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCO) reverses recommendations made two years ago, when a Calabasas cityhood movement failed after LAFCO's staff concluded that such a city could not support itself.
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