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Las Virgenes Water District

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1986 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
In hindsight, the Las Virgenes Municipal Water District wishes it had flushed out all the bricks it urged its customers to put in their toilets to conserve water during a 1975 drought. The bathroom bricks may be partly to blame for a $6-million dispute between the water district and federal officials that threatens an innovative sewage treatment program. The fight is over sludge, the gooey, chocolate milkshake-colored solid waste that is left when common household sewage is treated.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2010 | By Richard Winton
A municipal water district engineer was arrested on suspicion of animal cruelty after he allegedly killed a former girlfriend's dog and dumped the small Maltese in a West Hills trash bin, investigators said Friday. Rommel Marzan, 44, was arrested Tuesday after investigators deemed that his story that he had fallen on the small dog was not credible and a veterinarian determined that the animal had died from blunt head trauma, Los Angeles County Sheriff's Det. Steve Colitti said. Marzan works for the Las Virgenes Municipal Water District.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1991 | AMY LOUISE KAZMIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1987, Calabasas resident Dave Clifford, concerned about his family's high water bills, began a conservation program in his home. The family used only one shower stall--which has a timer--to cut down on water warm-up time and so the other two showers would not need cleaning. Cold water from the shower and the sink was used to water plants. Cars went unwashed, the driveway unhosed. In three years, Clifford, his wife and his teen-age daughter reduced their annual water usage by about 40%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 2003 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
Its blueprints say the place is built of steel. People say it's actually made of Stelle. The $26-million campus that is scheduled to open Jan. 5 in Calabasas is being viewed as a tribute to a couple who helped turn a desolate, 89-square-mile area into one of Los Angeles County's most desirable places to live. The Alice C. Stelle Middle School will house as many as 1,000 students. Engineers say its steel construction is what makes it unusual. Residents say its name is what makes it important.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1986 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
The first thing Will Stokes looked for last week when he tore open sealed bids for a Westlake Village pipeline construction project was not the bidders' lowest price. Instead, the chief engineer for the Las Virgenes Municipal Water District quickly scanned the paper work for proof that each bidding contractor carried liability insurance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1986 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
Beleaguered Las Virgenes Municipal Water District officials, already at odds over how to fill two governing-board openings created by election irregularities, now are looking for a new chief administrator. Richard B. Baird, general manager of the Las Virgenes district, has resigned to become assistant general manager of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California. Baird will leave the Calabasas-based water district Oct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 2003 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
Its blueprints say the place is built of steel. People say it's actually made of Stelle. The $26-million campus that is scheduled to open Jan. 5 in Calabasas is being viewed as a tribute to a couple who helped turn a desolate, 89-square-mile area into one of Los Angeles County's most desirable places to live. The Alice C. Stelle Middle School will house as many as 1,000 students. Engineers say its steel construction is what makes it unusual. Residents say its name is what makes it important.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1992 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hours after the Metropolitan Water District decided Tuesday to make more water available to parched cities, officials in Burbank and the Las Virgenes area said they plan to follow suit and relax strict mandatory conservation programs enacted to combat the persistent drought. The MWD board, responding to rising reservoirs and heavy winter storms, voted unanimously to increase supplies to clients for the first time in more than a year, although the board emphasized that the drought is not over.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2000 | GRACE E. JANG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It began boldly, as one of the world's first programs to recycle sewage. Officials built a $50-million cluster of gymnasium-sized buildings on the road to Malibu where human waste could be transformed into usable compost. But the high hopes have degenerated into bad feelings as pungent and persistent odors at Rancho Las Virgenes Composting facility have estranged neighbors and driven a wedge between the Ventura and Los Angeles county officials who control the project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1987 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
The Las Virgenes Municipal Water District, which is fighting a $5.9-million penalty by the federal government over use of a sewage disposal facility in Calabasas, has won some support in Congress. House members voting on the Water Quality Act of 1987 have pledged congressional action if necessary to end a dispute between the Environmental Protection Agency and the Las Virgenes district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2000 | GRACE E. JANG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It began boldly, as one of the world's first programs to recycle sewage. Officials built a $50-million cluster of gymnasium-sized buildings on the road to Malibu where human waste could be transformed into usable compost. But the high hopes have degenerated into bad feelings as pungent and persistent odors at Rancho Las Virgenes Composting facility have estranged neighbors and driven a wedge between the Ventura and Los Angeles county officials who control the project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1996 | FRANK MANNING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two minority employees of the Las Virgenes Municipal Water District have filed a lawsuit against the agency, alleging that they were subjected for at least three years to racial discrimination and harassment by co-workers and supervisors. The suit comes just months after the district paid $62,500 in an out-of-court settlement to a former female district employee who claimed that she had been subjected to gender-based harassment. The suit, filed Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1992 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hours after the Metropolitan Water District decided Tuesday to make more water available to parched cities, officials in Burbank and the Las Virgenes area said they plan to follow suit and relax strict mandatory conservation programs enacted to combat the persistent drought. The MWD board, responding to rising reservoirs and heavy winter storms, voted unanimously to increase supplies to clients for the first time in more than a year, although the board emphasized that the drought is not over.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1991 | AMY LOUISE KAZMIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1987, Calabasas resident Dave Clifford, concerned about his family's high water bills, began a conservation program in his home. The family used only one shower stall--which has a timer--to cut down on water warm-up time and so the other two showers would not need cleaning. Cold water from the shower and the sink was used to water plants. Cars went unwashed, the driveway unhosed. In three years, Clifford, his wife and his teen-age daughter reduced their annual water usage by about 40%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1991 | AMY LOUISE KAZMIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Las Virgenes Municipal Water District will try to survive the drought by refusing to accept new customers, casting doubt on the fate of many proposed developments in the southwestern San Fernando Valley. Faced with a mandatory 17% cutback ordered by the Metropolitan Water District, which provides the local utility's entire supply, Las Virgenes directors voted Monday night to provide water only to existing customers and new ones who received commitments before Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1987 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
The Las Virgenes Municipal Water District, which is fighting a $5.9-million penalty by the federal government over use of a sewage disposal facility in Calabasas, has won some support in Congress. House members voting on the Water Quality Act of 1987 have pledged congressional action if necessary to end a dispute between the Environmental Protection Agency and the Las Virgenes district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1991 | AMY LOUISE KAZMIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Las Virgenes Municipal Water District will try to survive the drought by refusing to accept new customers, casting doubt on the fate of many proposed developments in the southwestern San Fernando Valley. Faced with a mandatory 17% cutback ordered by the Metropolitan Water District, which provides the local utility's entire supply, Las Virgenes directors voted Monday night to provide water only to existing customers and new ones who received commitments before Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1986 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
Beleaguered Las Virgenes Municipal Water District officials, already at odds over how to fill two governing-board openings created by election irregularities, now are looking for a new chief administrator. Richard B. Baird, general manager of the Las Virgenes district, has resigned to become assistant general manager of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California. Baird will leave the Calabasas-based water district Oct.
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