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Lasers

NEWS
December 7, 1992 | from Associated Press
After four days of trying, astronauts aboard the space shuttle Discovery received laser signals Sunday that were beamed up at them from Florida by the Defense Department. The lime-colored light signals, which contained navigation data, were sent from an Air Force facility in Palm Bay. "The green laser was clearly visible, visually and through the camera," said shuttle commander David Walker. "Whatever they've done to change the laser on the ground has fixed our problem."
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BUSINESS
November 13, 1990 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trimedyne Inc., a Tustin medical laser catheter manufacturer struggling to revive flagging sales, said Monday that it has received Food and Drug Administration approval to market the first "cold laser" for opening blocked leg arteries. Trimedyne in 1987 was the first company to win the FDA's approval to market a laser-powered "hot-tip" catheter to sear through fatty plaque in leg arteries.
BUSINESS
November 13, 1990 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trimedyne Inc., a medical laser catheter manufacturer struggling to revive flagging sales, said Monday that it has received approval from the Food and Drug Administration to market the first so-called "cold laser" for opening blocked arteries of the legs. Trimedyne in 1987 was the first company to win the FDA's approval to market a laser-powered "hot-tip" catheter to sear through fatty plaque in leg arteries.
NEWS
January 1, 1987 | Associated Press
Researchers have combined laser beams and specially coated glass to produce the first computer-type circuit that processes data with light rather than electronically, scientists say. The simple circuit is an important step in showing the feasibility of "optical computing," said Frank Tooley, a lecturer in the physics department of Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, Scotland. Tooley is co-author of a report on the circuit in today's issue of the British journal Nature.
NEWS
November 28, 1998 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Chinese government may be building a powerful anti-satellite laser that could deprive the U.S. military of a key advantage in any future conflict in Asia by disabling the American fleet of "spies in the sky," the Pentagon has warned.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2009 | Peter Pae
At age 60, C. Kumar N. Patel had a resume of accomplishments few scientists could match. In a span of four decades, Patel invented the carbon dioxide laser, which revolutionized manufacturing and surgical procedures, obtained 38 patents and ran the physics and engineering departments at Bell Labs, a premier research operation historically attached to AT&T.
NEWS
September 3, 1994 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ideological and political battles over nuclear weapon research were presumed as dead as the arms race, but bomb designers and arms control advocates are facing off yet again over a massive weapon project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The lab, east of San Francisco, wants to build a laser the size of a football stadium.
NATIONAL
December 20, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Authorities in Newark arrested a man and accused him of shining a laser pointer into the cockpit of a hovering news helicopter, temporarily blinding the pilot. Pedro Vega, 36, was charged with offenses including assault and interference with transportation. The WNBC-TV helicopter was covering a traffic accident Nov. 18 when the laser was shone into the cockpit from about 1,000 feet away, said Bill Maer, a Passaic County sheriff's spokesman.
NEWS
July 29, 1997 | From Associated Press
Government advisors on Monday rejected a revolutionary approach to treating heart angina--a laser that promised to relieve chronic patients' crippling pain by zapping up to 40 tiny holes into the heart itself. Some patients clearly showed relief from pain, advisors to the Food and Drug Administration said.
NEWS
October 4, 1997 | From Reuters
The State Department on Friday endorsed a Pentagon decision to fire a powerful U.S. military laser against a $60-million satellite to test its destructive power, saying it will not complicate arms control goals. "We don't have trouble with this test," spokesman James Rubin told a news briefing. "It's not a test of an anti-satellite system. It's an experiment that will not destroy the satellite, will not result in any debris, will not pose any risk," he said.
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