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Lasse Hallstrom

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1987 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
How has Swedish director Lasse Hallstrom remembered so precisely that knife edge between pain and delight that is childhood? In "My Life as a Dog" (Friday at the Music Hall) he has caught it all, in a sterling film whose style sits between the light moments of his compatriot, Ingmar Bergman, and the darker moments of Francois Truffaut's childhood films. With freshness in such short supply that it's nearly endangered, "My Life as a Dog" should be cherished.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
The late Sonny Bono founded the Palm Springs International Film Festival while mayor of the desert community, and more than two decades later, the beat goes on for the cinematic celebration. This year's event opens Thursday evening with Pablo Berger's "Blancanieves," a unique black-and-white silent version of "Snow White" from Spain. The 24th edition of the festival continues through Jan. 14 and will feature 180 films from 68 countries, including 63 features by first-time directors.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1988 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
While waiting to begin production on a new feature film version of "Peter Pan"--and, more important, to find out if he will win Academy Awards tonight for directing and co-authoring the hit film "My Life as a Dog"--Swedish film maker Lasse Hallstrom says he has been "getting some wet feet" by making a television pilot. Hallstrom, 41, is a relative newcomer to Hollywood, to television and, apparently, to American slang--but he is happily looking forward to his life as a TV producer.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
A pleasant fantasy with a crackerjack title, "Salmon Fishing in the Yemen"is a charming film whose few attempts at seriousness are best forgotten or ignored. When Emily Blunt and Ewan McGregor are your stars, that is easy to do. Blunt and McGregor are two of the most gifted and attractive actors working today, able to play off each other with great style, and when they invest themselves in these amusing characters they bring to life the film's very contrived plot about bringing British angling to the desert of the Middle East.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
The late Sonny Bono founded the Palm Springs International Film Festival while mayor of the desert community, and more than two decades later, the beat goes on for the cinematic celebration. This year's event opens Thursday evening with Pablo Berger's "Blancanieves," a unique black-and-white silent version of "Snow White" from Spain. The 24th edition of the festival continues through Jan. 14 and will feature 180 films from 68 countries, including 63 features by first-time directors.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2008 | RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ
WHO KNEW Tom Cruise could shake it like a Polaroid picture? Last week, he rocked audiences with his cameo as a profane, hip-jiggling, Machiavellian movie chief in "Tropic Thunder." The role was designed to show the world -- and Hollywood insiders -- that the one-time king of Hollywood didn't take himself too seriously and even had comedic chops. His performance was funny, but somehow as with all things Cruise these days, a black cloud emerged from the silver lining. His tour de force was overshadowed by yet another hellish publicity week, which included debates over whether "Tropic Thunder" was degrading to the mentally disabled as well as an inaccurate story that Sony had replaced Cruise in the film "Edwin A. Salt" with "it" girl Angelina Jolie.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Chocolat" is as delectable as its title, but for all its sensuality it is ultimately concerned with the spirit. A fable of deceptive simplicity, adapted for the screen with mature skill and wisdom by a young American screenwriter, Robert Nelson Jacobs, from Joanne Harris' novel, it emerges as a splendid work in the grand humanist tradition of the classic cinema of France, where it takes place.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
A pleasant fantasy with a crackerjack title, "Salmon Fishing in the Yemen"is a charming film whose few attempts at seriousness are best forgotten or ignored. When Emily Blunt and Ewan McGregor are your stars, that is easy to do. Blunt and McGregor are two of the most gifted and attractive actors working today, able to play off each other with great style, and when they invest themselves in these amusing characters they bring to life the film's very contrived plot about bringing British angling to the desert of the Middle East.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1996 | Sean Mitchell, Sean Mitchell is an occasional contributor to Calendar
When movie-makers from around the world converge on the Cannes Film Festival this month, the city on the French Riviera will be, for many, merely a stopover on the way to Hollywood. Now, more than ever, the American studios, big and small, are scouting the globe for new non-American talent, and Cannes is the great bazaar of buzz where the next Renny Harlins and Alfonso Araus are likely to be taking meetings.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2001
The American Cinematheque is presenting a retrospective of the work of director Lasse Hallstrom at the Egyptian Theater in Hollywood from Thursday to Dec. 15. The films to be screened: "A Guy and a Gal" and "Father to Be" on Thursday; "My Life as a Dog" and "What's Eating Gilbert Grape" next Friday; and "ABBA: The Movie" and "Chocolat" on Dec. 15. The director will appear each night to answer questions between pictures.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2008 | RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ
WHO KNEW Tom Cruise could shake it like a Polaroid picture? Last week, he rocked audiences with his cameo as a profane, hip-jiggling, Machiavellian movie chief in "Tropic Thunder." The role was designed to show the world -- and Hollywood insiders -- that the one-time king of Hollywood didn't take himself too seriously and even had comedic chops. His performance was funny, but somehow as with all things Cruise these days, a black cloud emerged from the silver lining. His tour de force was overshadowed by yet another hellish publicity week, which included debates over whether "Tropic Thunder" was degrading to the mentally disabled as well as an inaccurate story that Sony had replaced Cruise in the film "Edwin A. Salt" with "it" girl Angelina Jolie.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Chocolat" is as delectable as its title, but for all its sensuality it is ultimately concerned with the spirit. A fable of deceptive simplicity, adapted for the screen with mature skill and wisdom by a young American screenwriter, Robert Nelson Jacobs, from Joanne Harris' novel, it emerges as a splendid work in the grand humanist tradition of the classic cinema of France, where it takes place.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1996 | Sean Mitchell, Sean Mitchell is an occasional contributor to Calendar
When movie-makers from around the world converge on the Cannes Film Festival this month, the city on the French Riviera will be, for many, merely a stopover on the way to Hollywood. Now, more than ever, the American studios, big and small, are scouting the globe for new non-American talent, and Cannes is the great bazaar of buzz where the next Renny Harlins and Alfonso Araus are likely to be taking meetings.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1988 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
While waiting to begin production on a new feature film version of "Peter Pan"--and, more important, to find out if he will win Academy Awards tonight for directing and co-authoring the hit film "My Life as a Dog"--Swedish film maker Lasse Hallstrom says he has been "getting some wet feet" by making a television pilot. Hallstrom, 41, is a relative newcomer to Hollywood, to television and, apparently, to American slang--but he is happily looking forward to his life as a TV producer.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1987 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
How has Swedish director Lasse Hallstrom remembered so precisely that knife edge between pain and delight that is childhood? In "My Life as a Dog" (Friday at the Music Hall) he has caught it all, in a sterling film whose style sits between the light moments of his compatriot, Ingmar Bergman, and the darker moments of Francois Truffaut's childhood films. With freshness in such short supply that it's nearly endangered, "My Life as a Dog" should be cherished.
NEWS
November 28, 2002
Drama queen: An anonymous bidder paid nearly $6,000 on Wednesday for an emotional letter penned by opera diva Maria Callas after she was rejected by Aristotle Onassis in favor of former U.S. First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy. Saddle up: A musical version of "Urban Cowboy" is heading to Broadway, due to open in February, according to E! Online. Going nuclear: Leonardo DiCaprio will star in "Bombshell," an A-bomb thriller to be directed by Lasse Hallstrom ("The Cider House Rules").
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Real Broadcast News: Actress Holly Hunter, Swedish director Lasse Hallstrom and producers Amy Robinson and Griffin Dunne were on hand to kick off the 1991 Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah, which runs through Jan. 27. The festival opened Thursday in a somber mood as attention centered on developments in the Persian Gulf. "Everyone feels awkward," Hunter said before her new film, "Once Around," opened the festival, which spotlights independent filmmakers.
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