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Lassie Movie

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1994 | MIMI AVINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lassie's place in the pantheon of great American screen icons is solid. For 50 years the collie whose long, glossy coat rippled in the breeze as she ran across panoramic fields of grass has been a friend of uncommon bravery, intelligence and loyalty to a lonely boy. And, by extension, to anyone who has sat in the dark longing for such an extraordinary companion. While the dog's character has always been unassailable, what is a matter of some confusion is its gender.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2006 | Michael Wilmington, Chicago Tribune
Dog and movie lovers, take note: Lassie has come home. Writer-director Charles Sturridge's "Lassie" revives a well-worn, sometimes grand tradition begun in 1938, when Eric Knight's first Lassie story was published.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1994 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
L aaa s eeeee . . . It's the mantra that sends a primal shiver up and down the spines of oldsters who remember "Lassie Come Home" when it opened in 1943. It makes the boomers who grew up on the TV show, which ran from 1954 to 1971, get all warm and fuzzy. But do we need a new Lassie movie? Apparently the studio marketeers think so. There's been a revival in animal movies--we'll see seals and stallions before the summer is through.
NEWS
August 4, 1994 | PATRICK MOTT, Patrick Mott is a frequent contributor to The Times Orange County Edition.
A wandering Lassie is rescued from a car wreck by the Turner family, but the bonding and family values don't bloom until the collie survives a wolf fight and rich kids on tractors, among other things. (Rated PG). * OK, collie breeders, you can start making plans for that luxury condo in Hawaii. Your champion has returned. And as a result, kids of the latest generation are forming a mental image of their ideal smartest, bravest, best friend, and it looks a lot like a dog.
NEWS
August 4, 1994 | PATRICK MOTT, Patrick Mott is a frequent contributor to The Times Orange County Edition.
A wandering Lassie is rescued from a car wreck by the Turner family, but the bonding and family values don't bloom until the collie survives a wolf fight and rich kids on tractors, among other things. (Rated PG). * OK, collie breeders, you can start making plans for that luxury condo in Hawaii. Your champion has returned. And as a result, kids of the latest generation are forming a mental image of their ideal smartest, bravest, best friend, and it looks a lot like a dog.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2006 | Michael Wilmington, Chicago Tribune
Dog and movie lovers, take note: Lassie has come home. Writer-director Charles Sturridge's "Lassie" revives a well-worn, sometimes grand tradition begun in 1938, when Eric Knight's first Lassie story was published.
HEALTH
July 18, 2011 | By Karen Ravn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
They cuddle and purr. And they shed. They wag their tails and fetch your slippers. And they shed. They never talk back and they never hold a grudge. And they shed. There are obvious pluses and minuses to living with pets, not only with respect to your happiness and housekeeping, but also with respect to your health. Here's a sampling of some of what scientists know about how pets can affect your physiological and psychological well-being - the good, bad and downright gruesome. THE GOOD Health: An Australian survey found that dog and cat owners were in better health than people with neither (health was measured either by how often people went to the doctor or by how much medication they took)
NEWS
August 9, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Thousands of Orthodox Jews demonstrated outside an auditorium showing "Lassie Come Home" on Saturday in a protest against film screenings that religious Jews say desecrate the Sabbath. An estimated 3,000 Hasidic men and boys from the religious enclave of Mea Shearim protested in front of the auditorium where about 40 people, mostly children, watched the matinee. Security sources said five men were arrested after protesters threw rocks and bottles at police guarding the auditorium.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1987
The Simi Valley City Council has voted to ask the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy for $1 million to help establish a park on the site of Hopetown Ranch, a former movie set. The conservancy, which buys land to preserve in a natural state for public use, is to consider the request at its Aug. 4 meeting. The proposal, passed by the council Monday, must also be approved by the Rancho Simi Recreation and Park District, which is collaborating with Simi Valley in the park effort.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2006 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
As a teenager in Brooklyn in the early 1950s, Connie Stevens had such a big crush on teen actor Gary Gray that she started her own Gary Gray Fan Club. "I just thought he was adorable and wrote him, 'Could I be your president back here?' " Stevens, who later became an actress, told The Times this week. "There were only five or six of us [in the fan club], but we were pretty mighty!"
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1994 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
L aaa s eeeee . . . It's the mantra that sends a primal shiver up and down the spines of oldsters who remember "Lassie Come Home" when it opened in 1943. It makes the boomers who grew up on the TV show, which ran from 1954 to 1971, get all warm and fuzzy. But do we need a new Lassie movie? Apparently the studio marketeers think so. There's been a revival in animal movies--we'll see seals and stallions before the summer is through.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1994 | MIMI AVINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lassie's place in the pantheon of great American screen icons is solid. For 50 years the collie whose long, glossy coat rippled in the breeze as she ran across panoramic fields of grass has been a friend of uncommon bravery, intelligence and loyalty to a lonely boy. And, by extension, to anyone who has sat in the dark longing for such an extraordinary companion. While the dog's character has always been unassailable, what is a matter of some confusion is its gender.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1993 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Speaking of turkeys. . . . Even if all personal firearms were banned across the board in the U.S., Americans would still be confronted by the biggest assault weapon of all. Television. It's the nation's fast-firing electronic Uzi that assaults nonstop, spraying its mayhem message relentlessly and indiscriminately. Take the case of Gary Wosk of Sylmar.
SPORTS
November 28, 1996 | JIM MURRAY
Golf is now a five-letter word. It's spelled "W-O-O-D-S." Tiger Woods is no longer merely an athlete. He's an industry. It's already beginning. The headline writers know where their readers are coming from. The headline reads: "Tiger Woods Finishes Fifth, Greg Norman Wins Australian Open." And that's Greg Norman! Imagine if it had been some rinky-dink tour journeyman. He'd have been lucky to make paragraph eight.
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