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Latasha Harlins

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1991 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A videotape played Monday in a Los Angeles courtroom showed that Latasha Harlins had turned away from a scuffle with a Korean grocer when the black teen-ager was shot in the back of the head. "This is not television. This is not the movies. This is real life," Deputy District Attorney Roxane Carvajal had warned the jury. "You will see Latasha being killed. She will die in front of your eyes."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2013 | By Scott Gold
It's not every day someone chases you down with citizenship papers to prove her name. Then again, Annie Shin managed to live for 64 years without being accused of killing someone. You do what you have to do. “My name is Annie Shin!” she shouted in fractured English, waving her heavily creased documents for emphasis. Then, in case there was any confusion: “No Du! No Du!” That name - Du - might not ring a bell. It's been a long time since a woman named Soon Ja Du shot Latasha Harlins in a liquor store at 91st and Figueroa streets.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1992
The family of a 15-year-old black girl slain by a Korean grocer will receive about $300,000 in settlement of a multimillion-dollar lawsuit, an attorney said. Soon Ja Du's insurance company agreed to pay "a little over $300,000" to the brother and sister of Latasha Harlins, said Charles Lloyd, Du's attorney. Harlins was shot and killed by Du during a confrontation in March, 1991, over whether the youth had paid for a bottle of orange juice in a store owned by the Du family.
NEWS
August 1, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
When Brenda Stevenson came to UCLA to teach, after studying at Yale and working at the University of Texas, Austin, she thought she knew from multicultural. But L.A. had a vast and distinctly complex ethnic weft and warp that she hadn't anticipated; she explores two threads, the Korean and African American ones, in her new book about the 1991 killing of a black teenager, “The Contested Murder of Latasha Harlins.” I spoke to her about it for my “Patt Morrison Asks” column.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1992 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The state Supreme Court, ending a divisive, racially charged legal battle, on Thursday let stand Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Joyce A. Karlin's decision granting probation to a Korean-born grocer in the videotaped fatal shooting of a black teen-ager. In a brief order, the court refused to review an appellate ruling upholding the sentence issued by Karlin in November. The justices turned down an appeal by Los Angeles Dist. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1993 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Denise Harlins thinks back to the point when her life veered onto a course she never imagined, she remembers sitting in a Los Angeles courtroom at a bail hearing for Soon Ja Du. The Korean-born grocer had shot to death Harlins' 15-year-old niece, Latasha, on March 16, 1991, in South Los Angeles, in a dispute over a bottle of orange juice. At the hearing, Harlins sat with her family and a few friends as Du pleaded not guilty to murder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1992 | PATT MORRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A little south and a bit east of where the fury of last week spent itself, the store where Latasha Harlins died still stands. That it is still there is not for want of trying. Four times on the night of April 29, when chances of getting a firefighter were nil, someone tried to torch the Empire Liquor Market Deli. Four times, with buckets and garbage cans full of water, black men, women and children blotted the fires out.
OPINION
July 31, 2013 | Patt Morrison
Historian Brenda E. Stevenson (pictured in her UCLA office, with an African sculpture) mostly writes about the long-gone - 18th and 19th century African Americans, and the lives of enslaved women. Then came the case that made history while L.A. watched: Korean-born shopkeeper Soon Ja Du killed black teenager Latasha Harlins over a bottle of orange juice. A jury convicted Du of voluntary manslaughter, but she was sentenced only to probation and community service. Stevenson's new book, "The Contested Murder of Latasha Harlins," analyzes the other "no justice, no peace" case that echoes through the 1992 riots and into the present day. Thirteen days after the Rodney King beating, Harlins was shot and killed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2013 | By Scott Gold
It's not every day someone chases you down with citizenship papers to prove her name. Then again, Annie Shin managed to live for 64 years without being accused of killing someone. You do what you have to do. “My name is Annie Shin!” she shouted in fractured English, waving her heavily creased documents for emphasis. Then, in case there was any confusion: “No Du! No Du!” That name - Du - might not ring a bell. It's been a long time since a woman named Soon Ja Du shot Latasha Harlins in a liquor store at 91st and Figueroa streets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1991
The shooting of 15-year-old Latasha Harlins in a South-Central Los Angeles market was, indeed, tragic. But can someone explain just why she put the orange juice in her knapsack before paying for it? CHRISTY M. HAYS Canoga Park
OPINION
July 31, 2013 | Patt Morrison
Historian Brenda E. Stevenson (pictured in her UCLA office, with an African sculpture) mostly writes about the long-gone - 18th and 19th century African Americans, and the lives of enslaved women. Then came the case that made history while L.A. watched: Korean-born shopkeeper Soon Ja Du killed black teenager Latasha Harlins over a bottle of orange juice. A jury convicted Du of voluntary manslaughter, but she was sentenced only to probation and community service. Stevenson's new book, "The Contested Murder of Latasha Harlins," analyzes the other "no justice, no peace" case that echoes through the 1992 riots and into the present day. Thirteen days after the Rodney King beating, Harlins was shot and killed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2012 | By Patt Morrison, Los Angeles Times
In 1997, Dominick Dunne wrote a book whose title has stuck with me, although not for the reasons Dunne intended when he crafted his gossipy novel about the O.J. Simpson case. His title, "Another City, Not My Own," summed up how I had felt in 1992 when my own Los Angeles was suddenly a stranger to me. To live in Los Angeles during the riots was like waking up and seeing your own room through a distorting lens. You recognized the place, but something didn't look right. That was La Brea Boulevard on TV, all right - but the shop windows were shattered.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1996 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Black teenager Latasha Harlins' slaying by a Korean-born grocer greatly inflamed racial tensions in Los Angeles and, along with the Rodney G. King verdicts, helped fuel the rioting that convulsed the city in 1992. It also catapulted into prominence Patricia Moore. The otherwise little-known Compton councilwoman led a recall campaign against the Superior Court judge who sentenced Harlins' killer to probation instead of a jail term.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1995 | MILES CORWIN
Just seven people showed up to memorialize Latasha Harlins this week, a quiet, somber group whose members lit incense, carried candles and posted placards in front of the home of the woman who killed her. The brief gathering on a placid suburban street in the San Fernando Valley was a striking contrast to the boisterous protests that used to attract hundreds of people and packs of reporters and camera crews.
MAGAZINE
October 2, 1994
Regarding "Crossing the Culture Line" (by Lydia Chavez, Aug. 28): Activists Karen Bass and Bong Hwan Kim are among the best and the brightest in a new alliance of community coalition builders. I am pleased that they are finally receiving the recognition they so richly deserve. Louis Caldera Assembly Member, 46th District Los Angeles It's very telling that when Chavez mentions four Korean-American merchants who were murdered in 1986, she doesn't mention their names.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1993 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Denise Harlins thinks back to the point when her life veered onto a course she never imagined, she remembers sitting in a Los Angeles courtroom at a bail hearing for Soon Ja Du. The Korean-born grocer had shot to death Harlins' 15-year-old niece, Latasha, on March 16, 1991, in South Los Angeles, in a dispute over a bottle of orange juice. At the hearing, Harlins sat with her family and a few friends as Du pleaded not guilty to murder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1992
Nearly one year after a Korean-born grocer was sentenced to five years probation for the killing of 15-year-old Latasha Harlins, a small group of family members and friends demonstrated outside the Federal Building in Westwood on Friday. "We will never let people forget the death of this child, until justice is achieved," said Gina Rae, leader of the Justice for Latasha Harlins Committee.
OPINION
October 27, 1991
For the last few months many of us in Los Angeles have been following the tragic story of the death of Latasha Harlins. Your coverage has been thorough, but your frequent referrals to both Latasha Harlins' and Soon Ja Du's race seems to me to exacerbate the misunderstanding and distrust not only between the African-American and Korean communities, but among us all. A terrible thing happened in March. A young woman's life was snuffed out. A family had a child, a sister, a cousin violently extracted from its midst.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1992
Nearly one year after a Korean-born grocer was sentenced to five years probation for the killing of 15-year-old Latasha Harlins, a small group of family members and friends demonstrated outside the Federal Building in Westwood on Friday. "We will never let people forget the death of this child, until justice is achieved," said Gina Rae, leader of the Justice for Latasha Harlins Committee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1992 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The younger siblings of Latasha Harlins, the teen-ager who was fatally shot last year by grocer Soon Ja Du, will split a $300,000 court settlement from Du's insurance company, but the children's father will receive nothing, a judge ruled Tuesday. The ruling closes another chapter in a case that heightened tensions among Korean-born merchants and their customers in South Los Angeles last year and which, many believe, contributed to the recent riots.
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