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ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2010 | By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
F. Scott Fitzgerald, who once said, "There are no second acts in American lives," probably wouldn't know what to make of Craig Kilborn. After all, the 47-year-old Minnesota native is about to start his fourth act. The lanky ex-host of Comedy Central's "The Daily Show" and CBS' "The Late Late Show" returns to television with "The Kilborn File," a topical half-hour talk and comedy show that debuts at 6:30 p.m. Monday on Fox's KTTV-TV Channel 11....
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OPINION
April 9, 2014 | Meghan Daum
In a final passing of the torch to a new generation of late-night talk show hosts, David Letterman announced last week that he would retire in 2015. As intelligent and unique a force as he's always been, the timing seems right. Since beginning his late-night career more than 30 years ago, Letterman has evolved from exuberant, smart-alecky nerd to crotchety, occasionally befuddled elder statesman. Watching him now, it's hard to believe he was once considered the epitome of edginess, a darling of the college crowd and hero to sarcastic eggheads everywhere.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2013 | By Meg James
The laughs aren't what they used to be in late night. NBC has confirmed weeks of speculation by saying it plans to blow up its late-night schedule (once again) to clear the way for a younger comedian. NBC's "Tonight Show" host Jay Leno, 62, has agreed to retire next spring to make way for 38-year-old Jimmy Fallon, whose comedy show currently runs at 12:35 p.m. on NBC. This season, "The Tonight Show With Jay Leno" is drawing 3.4 million viewers an episode, making Leno the undisputed champ of late-night comedy, according to ratings firm Nielsen.  Leno has been in the chair 22 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2014 | By Jason Wells
Mockery of Los Angeles' response to the magnitude 4.4 earthquake that struck earlier this week continued on the late-night talk show circuit Tuesday -- only this time the main targets weren't just scrambling news anchors. Jimmy Kimmel, who a day earlier poked fun at L.A.'s local news anchors for their on-air reactions to the quake, took to the streets of Hollywood for his "Lie Witness News" segment, which fooled unsuspecting passersby into believing that "the Big One" had been forecast to strike the next day at a predetermined time.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2012 | By Mary McNamara
First the Olympics and now the Republicans. There seems to be a conspiracy to keep a lot of Americans watching their televisions long into the night. At Tuesday night's hurricane-challenged and already once rescheduled Republican convention, the star speaker of the night, first lady wannabe Ann Romney, doesn't take the podium until 10 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, another convention headliner, to follow directly after. For folks in the East eager to hear about the soft side of Mitt Romney or to see if this will be Christie's Convention Moment, that means a rather late night.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
It's Friday, so what better time for the latest musical mash-up from the creative minds at "Late Night with Jimmy Fallon"? This time around, the people behind the all-clucking verison of the Lumineers and "All I Want for Christmas" with classroom instruments have assembled sound bites of the NBC News anchor "rapping" the song "Regulate" by Warren G. (On Wednesday night, it was " Nuthin' but a G Thang . ") Perhaps the funniest thing about these mash-ups is that performing a cover of a '90s-era hip-hop classic is exactly the kind of thing the newsman might do. PHOTOS: Celebrities by The Times Bri-Wi, are you listening?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
During a recent interview with Pop & Hiss about his new album "IV Play," The-Dream seemed most excited by far about "Too Early," a mournful electro-blues cut the influential R&B star recorded with Gary Clark Jr. on guitar. So perhaps it's no surprise that for his gig Friday on "Late Night with Jimmy Fallon," The-Dream chose to play "Too Early" over the album's title-track single. Whatever his reasoning, we're glad he did: Expertly backed by Clark and Fallon's house band, the Roots, The-Dream brought a unique mixture of swagger and vulnerability to his performance; the moment near the end when his voice cracks is heartbreaking in all the right ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2013 | By Yvonne Villarreal
For Arsenio Hall, revisiting the talk show circuit after a nearly 20-year absence, comes with at least two caveats for the Dog Pound looking to get reacquainted with their ol' late night pal: less hair, littler shoulder pads. "It's kind of the same Arsenio you know," Hall joked while promoting his upcoming late-night talker, "The Arsenio Hall Show," Monday at the Television Critics Assn. press tour.  Hall made a splash on the late-night arena in the late '80s and early '90s, with his hit syndicated talk show, bringing a new voice to the scene and creating memorable moments along the way (he cites Magic Johnson's revealing he had HIV, and then-presidential hopeful Bill Clinton playing the saxophone as his most personally memorable shows)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2010 | By ROBERT LLOYD, Television Critic
The most interesting person on late-night television is a 47-year-old Scottish reformed alcoholic high-school dropout, drummer, actor, comic and novelist named Craig Ferguson, who since 2005 has been hosting "The Late Late Show," which follows David Letterman's "Late Show" on CBS. He is not the only talk show host whose work I like, or even the only one I'm tempted to call a genius -- the other would be Letterman, whose Worldwide Pants produces Ferguson's...
NEWS
February 13, 2014 | By Amy Hubbard
Look who's helping Seth Meyers make his debut on "Late Night" -- the runner-up to the commander-in-chief, Joe Biden. Biden announced that he would appear with the new host of the NBC talk show via Twitter: "Must-see TV. " The vice president, who has had his share of bloopers over the course of his career, adds a lively political touch to the debut, which will also feature Meyers' former "Saturday Night Live" castmate Amy Poehler. Perhaps Poehler will appear in Hillary Clinton guise.
SPORTS
March 14, 2014 | By Chris Dufresne
The best first-round game of the Big West tournament on Thursday got the least notice because it ended at 10:56 p.m. Pacific time in front of a sparse crowd at the Honda Center. Cal State Northridge's 87-84 overtime win over Hawaii, however, deserved more than a tack-on blurb at the end of a long day. Northridge, under first-year coach Reggie Theus, blew a 16-point first-half lead but rallied back from 13 points in the second half. The fifth-seeded Matadors tied the score at 74 on senior Josh Greene's three-pointer with 12 seconds left in the second half.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2014 | By Yvonne Villarreal
Ronan Farrow stopped by "The Colbert Report" on Tuesday night for a confab about the youth generation and just who exactly is the target demo for his new MSNBC show -- hint, it doesn't exclude grandmothers leaving church collection early. After introducing the 26-year-old wunderkind (against the background song from could-be/could-not-be father Frank Sinatra's "Fly Me to the Moon") and listing his various achievements at a tender age, host Stephen Colbert teased Farrow about the purported generation his show, "Ronan Farrow Daily," intends to appeal to. The show airs at "1 p.m. weekdays to appeal to the youth demographic of people who are just waking up from not getting to their job," Colbert said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2014 | By August Brown
AUSTIN, Texas - The state is known for its stalwart independent streak, but on the first night of music at South by Southwest, Austin was a place for the world to mingle. From L.A. buzz bands to K-pop superstars and pop-rap titans, Tuesday's late-night lineup proved that, for all the worries that SXSW has become a targeted-marketing snake eating its own hashtagged-and-branded tail, there really isn't a better mile of live music in America than what's happening this week. Our estimable hometown was well represented Tuesday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Scott Collins
Thank you,  Jimmy Fallon, for giving the late-night ratings race the kick in the pants it needed. Not even two weeks into his new "Tonight Show" gig, Fallon has dominated viewing in a way that few expected. On Thursday, NBC released Nielsen data that showed Fallon's "Tonight" on NBC gathered 10.4 million total viewers during its first week, including people who watched on their DVRs up to three days after the original broadcast. That makes it the biggest overall audience for the program since the last week that Johnny Carson hosted, in May 1992.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2014 | by Scott Collins
This "Late Night" thing might work out OK for Seth Meyers. The former "Weekend Update" newscaster on "Saturday Night Live" delivered the NBC talk show's highest ratings in nine years with his premiere on Monday. Well, technically it was Tuesday morning - 12:35 a.m. to be exact. But "Late Night With Seth Meyers" delivered a 2.6 rating/9 share in households from the top 56 markets in the nation, according to Nielsen. That compares with the 1.6 rating that "Late Night" has been averaging this season.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2014 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Seth Meyers, late of "Saturday Night Live," became Monday night the fourth host of NBC's late-late-night "Late Night," after David Letterman, Conan O'Brien and his onetime cast-mate Jimmy Fallon, who has now famously become the star of "The Tonight Show. " If two examples can make a rule, the road to this desk leads through "Weekend Update," the mid-show topical segment that Meyers hosted (again, like Fallon before him), a job that, its scripted nature not entirely aside, would seem fair training for running a talk show.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Arsenio Hall is back on late night after a 19-year absence, and his return made a strong showing in ratings Monday, especially in Los Angeles, according to early numbers from Nielsen.  In Nielsen's 25 markets with local people meters, CBS Television Distribution's "The Arsenio Hall Show" beat all other late-night talk show telecasts in key demographics. The show garnered a rating of 1.2 among adults aged 25-54 years old and a 1.0 in the 18-49 age group.  PHOTOS: Cable versus broadcast ratings For comparison, among 18-49ers, “The Tonight Show With Jay Leno” scored a 0.6 and a delayed "Late Show With David Letterman" got a 0.5 and "Jimmy Kimmel Live" received a 0.8. "The Arsenio Hall Show," which featured appearances by Paula Abdul, Chris Tucker and Snoop Dogg (putting aside his Snoop Lion alter ego)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2014 | By Meredith Blake
NEW YORK - Making his debut as host of "Late Night" on Monday, Seth Meyers struck a decidedly low-key note in a broadcast that emphasized finely tuned punch lines over star power and razzle-dazzle. Meyers opened the NBC show by paying tribute to one of his predecessor's best-known recurring bits, "Thank You Notes. " Seated at his desk, Meyers wrote a letter to Jimmy Fallon, now host of "The Tonight Show," promising to treat "Late Night" "with respect and dignity and to only use it to do completely original comedy pieces … starting now," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Seth Meyers kicked off his run as host of "Late Night" on Monday night, and to generate a little buzz, he brought on his former "Saturday Night Live" and "Weekend Update" colleague Amy Poehler and Vice President Joe Biden. One of them announced a run for president in 2016. Poehler and Biden have a flirty history, ever since Biden guest-starred on "Parks and Recration" as the object of Leslie Knope's affections. During his "Late Night" appearance, Poehler referred to him as a "gorgeous charm monster.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2014 | By Meredith Blake
NEW YORK - Making his debut as host of "Late Night" on Monday, Seth Meyers struck a decidedly low-key note in a broadcast that emphasized finely tuned punch lines over star power and razzle-dazzle. Meyers opened the NBC show by paying tribute to one of his predecessor's best-known recurring bits, "Thank You Notes. " Seated at his desk, Meyers wrote a letter to Jimmy Fallon, now host of "The Tonight Show," promising to treat "Late Night" "with respect and dignity and to only use it to do completely original comedy pieces … starting now," he said.
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